Shining Path Communication Network in Jungle of Peru Jungle Destroyed

first_imgBy Dialogo June 15, 2009 The Peruvian Army destroyed a communication network used by the remaining forces of the Shining Path (Sendero Luminoso) organization in the forest valley region of the Apurímac and Ene rivers, better known as VRAE, local press reported. This week an Army patrol entered a terrorist campsite in the Vizcatán area, from which the Path is assumed to have attacked Sanabamba Base soldiers last Friday, resulting in one casualty and four wounded soldiers. Mayor Luis Balbuena, spokesman for the Pichari military post, told the newspaper El Comercio de Lima that “the terrorist groups have been demobilized due to the lack of communication they are experiencing, and it will be several days before they can re-establish it.” Balbuena confirmed that the military operation continued on Thursday in the area where the Path’s campsites were located. Although the Armed Forces state that there were casualties among the subversives, Balbuena explained that Path members “do not leave their wounded (or dead in the field)” for fear that they might be identified and interrogated. “Nevertheless, we know that they have suffered casualties,” he said. The military operation this week in the Vizcatán has left one soldier wounded by the shrapnel of an explosive thrown by Path members, the source confirmed. According to state information quoted by El Comercio, about 300 Shining Path members compose the main forces of the organization called the Shining Path Central Regional Committee, led by Víctor Quispe Palomino, aka camarada José.last_img read more

Colombia to Extradite Suspected Narcotics Trafficker To Venezuela

first_imgBy Dialogo November 11, 2010 MEXICO CITY – Harold Mauricio Poveda Ortega, a suspected cocaine trafficker, was arrested by Mexican authorities on Nov. 5. Poveda, a Colombian national who goes by the alias “El Conejo,” allegedly is the largest supplier of cocaine to the Beltrán Leyva cartel, according to the Federal Public Security Secretariat (SSP). Poveda, 37, is suspected of trafficking about 150 tons of cocaine into Mexico from 1998-2000, officials said. Poveda, who also used the alias of “Jonder Antonio Nieves Monsalve” to pass for a Venezuelan national, was taken into custody in a southern area of Mexico City. Mexican and United States officials exchanged information about Poveda throughout the investigation, according to the Mexican website Vanguardia.com.mx. Poveda is suspected of acquiring the cocaine from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), officials said, according to the Colombian website El Colombiano.com. Peru: Shining Path suspected in police officer’s death Mexico: Harold Mauricio Poveda Ortega arrested LIMA, Peru – A police officer was killed and another was injured when suspected Shining Path members attacked a coca eradication team in a rural town in northern Peru, the Interior Ministry said. The attack occurred on Nov. 5 in the area of Guacamayo in the province of Tocache, where the officers and the eradication squad were camping for the night. The attack was in retaliation for the team destroying two makeshift cocaine laboratories in the area, officials said, according to EFE. One police officer was fatally shot in the chest and the second officer suffered a non-lethal injury in the leg by rebels, who didn’t suffer any losses during the raid, the Interior Ministry said. The Shining Path’s remaining members are based in the Upper Huallaga Valley under the command of Florindo Eleuterio Flores Hala, who goes by the alias of “Comrade Artemio,” and in the Valley of the Apurímac and Ene rivers (VRAE region) under the guidance of Víctor Quispe Palomino, alias “Comrade José.” The United States has issued a reward of up to US$5 million for information leading to either man’s capture, EFE reported. SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic – The National Drug Control Directorate (DNCD) has arrested 57 people linked to a nationwide drug trafficking operation. Police seized 262 cocaine bags, 113 of marijuana, 50 of crack, 10 motorcycles, two guns and $17,903 in Domincan Republican pesos (US$484), according to the DNCD. Two men taken into custody are suspected of selling narcotics from a grocery store in La Romana, said Col. Alcides Ramón Rodríguez Veras, a DNCD spokesman, according to the Dominican Republic website Listindiario.com.do. Colombia: Army destroys 870 suspected FARC land mines center_img Dominican Republic: 57 arrested on drug-trafficking charges Mexico: Manuel Fernández Valencia arrested BOGOTÁ, Colombia – The Colombian government will extradite suspected narcotics trafficker Walid Makled to his native Venezuela, where he’ll face trial, officials said. President Juan Manuel Santos pledged during a recent meeting with Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez that Makled, who goes by the alias “The Turk,” would be sent to Venezuela, where he is wanted on drug charges. Makled was taken into custody in August in Colombia during a joint operation with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Makled and his brothers are accused of using the airline they ran as part of an operation to export 10 tons of cocaine monthly. Two years ago, police apprehended Makled’s three brothers after discovering 300 kilograms (660 pounds) of cocaine on a family ranch. Makled also has been charged in Venezuela in connection with the killings of Colombian drug kingpin Wilber Alirio Varela, lawyer and journalist Orel Zambrano and veterinarian Francisco Larrazábal, both Venezuelan nationals. BOGOTÁ, Colombia – The army destroyed 870 anti-personnel mines suspected of belonging to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) in the department of Putumayo. The confiscation and destruction of the weapons, which are suspected of being the property of the FARC’s 32nd front, occurred in the municipality of Puerto Caicedo, according to a military statement. The troops also discovered more than 90 kilograms (198 pounds) of explosive materials and numerous syringes used to inject liquid during the manufacturing of improvised explosive devices, according to the Colombian website El Colombiano.com. MEXICO CITY – Manuel Fernández Valencia, who is suspected of working with one of the country’s most wanted drug kingpins to traffic eight tons of marijuana into the United States by the end of 2010, has been arrested, officials said. Fernández Valencia, an alleged member of the Sinaloa cartel, was apprehended after a 20-minute confrontation between police and gunmen, according to a Federal Police statement. Police also apprehended seven men suspected of working for the drug cartel, according to the statement. Fernández Valencia is suspected of working with cartel leader Joaquín Guzmán to traffic narcotics into the United States. Fernández Valencia has been sought for extradition by the United States since last year on narcotics-trafficking charges, according to The Associated Press. Guzmán and Ismael Zambada, who allegedly are the leaders of the Sinaloa cartel, are two of the country’s most wanted fugitives. Officials have offered a US$2 million reward for information leading to their locations.last_img read more

Brazilian Firm Embraer Inaugurates Its First U.S. Factory

first_imgBy Dialogo February 24, 2011 i would like to know what the price of long range aircraft for total 18 pax or 22pax & what is the latest available aircraft The Brazilian aircraft manufacturer Embraer has inaugurated its first aircraft final assembly plant in the United States, in which it has invested a total of fifty million dollars, the firm confirmed to AFP on 22 February. The new installation at Melbourne International Airport in Melbourne, Florida (in the southeastern United States), inaugurated on 21 February, will be initially dedicated to producing Phenom 100 four-passenger executive jets, a spokesperson for the firm said. The inauguration “of the first U.S. industrial site in Melbourne is a landmark for Embraer, as we fulfill our goal of bringing operations closer to our customers and to our largest market,” affirmed Frederico Fleury Curado, Embraer’s president and CEO, according to a press release. The Melbourne unit, which will have around two hundred employees, is also planned to include a customer center where purchasers can determine the interior design of their executive jets thanks to the use of 3D technology. The first Phenom 100 assembled in the United States should be delivered in the fourth quarter of 2011, the Brazilian firm specified. In 2010, Embraer delivered a total of one hundred Phenom 100 planes, making it the most-delivered executive jet in the world that year, the firm announced. With two hundred planes in the Phenom family (Phenom 100 and Phenom 300) already delivered, the firm has a portfolio of five hundred orders for these planes from forty-four countries, to be manufactured on the model’s two production lines, in Brazil and now in the United States. The U.S. installation is Embraer’s second factory outside Brazil, since it has a center in China where the ERJ 145 model is built. Embraer is the world’s third-largest manufacturer of commercial airplanes, after the giants Boeing (United States) and Airbus (European Union), and delivered 246 planes in 2010, a record. The firm’s models also cater to the defense sector.last_img read more

Brazil: Armed Forces Will Conduct Enormous Military Exercise in the Amazon

first_imgBy Dialogo May 23, 2011 According to the ministry, Joint Operation Amazonia 2011 aims to “improve the training of the three branches in order to act in a coordinated and effective manner in conventional conflicts in a jungle environment,” and will additionally provide the impetus for “civic-social” actions with the area’s population. Starting on 23 May, the Brazilian Army, Air Force, and Navy will conduct an enormous joint exercise in the Amazon region, mobilizing around 4,500 men for operations simulating war in the jungle, the Defense Ministry announced. The exercises will be held in an area “of approximately 800,000 square kilometers,” the ministry announced, from the city of Manaos to Yauarete, on the border with Colombia, and encompassing important Brazilian cities situated along the major Amazonian rivers. “This is a significant operation, the largest in recent years, and will include activity and simulations by the three branches of the armed forces, with a meaningful number of personnel, with a unified central command,” a Defense Ministry spokesperson told AFP. The exercises will begin on 23 May, and operations are expected to conclude only on 3 June. According to the ministry, Brazil will still organize similar operations this year in other regions of the country, especially in border areas. The ministry spokesperson indicated to AFP that Navy hospital ships and Army mobile clinics are expected to participate in order to bring medical and dental care to the inhabitants of isolated regions in the jungle.last_img read more

Nicaragua Destroys Marijuana Crops in Forest Reserve

first_img Nicaraguan Army troops destroyed over 15,000 illegal marihuana plants in the heart of the Bosawas biosphere reserve, the main one in Central America, according to the institution on April 24. The crops were found by the Army’s Ecological Battalion in the thick forests of the San José Wasmalú community in the center of the reserve, located in the North Atlantic Autonomous Region, Army spokesman Lt. Col. Orlando Palacios told AFP. The officer said the crops, which had plants over five meters tall, were “burned up” after an operation was conducted in the area with the support of the Police on April 21. Two people were arrested, and it is presumed that they have been planting marijuana in the area for three years. According to authorities, the drug would be commercialized in cities on the Nicaraguan Pacific, where there is higher demand. The Ecological Battalion was created two years ago with 700 Soldiers dedicated to taking care of protected areas in the nation, mainly the Bosawas jungle, which in 1997 was declared Biosphere Reserve by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). So far this year, authorities have destroyed over 63,000 marijuana plants only in Bosawas, located on a surface area 19,926 km2 wide to the northeast of Nicaragua. In recent years the vast jungle, inhabited by Caribbean indigenous communities and considered as one of the “lungs” of the planet, has been a target of timber traffickers who chop down trees, as well as people planting marijuana crops. Very interesting! But my question now is: could this “forest” fire also be used to destroy coca crops?? By Dialogo April 26, 2013last_img read more

Operation Martillo making strides in counter-narcotics fight

first_imgBy Dialogo July 29, 2013 MIAMI, U.S.A. – The United States’ teaming with Western Hemisphere and European countries has led to the seizure of more than 245,000 kilograms of narcotics as the result of Operation Martillo, an international mission that gathers partner nations to curtail illicit trafficking routes on both coasts of the Central American isthmus. “[U.S. Southern Command’s] commitment to working with partners, both in the region and throughout the U.S. government – from the military to the rest of our government – is helping build an integrated network of defense in the Western Hemisphere, based on shared responsibility and shared values,” United States Deputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter said in a prepared statement. “Through initiatives such as Operation Martillo, U.S. Southern Command and its partners are dismantling transnational criminal networks and disrupting illicit drug trafficking.” Operation Martillo, which is led by the U.S. Joint Interagency Task Force South and includes Canada, Belize, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Panama, Spain, and the United Kingdom, strives to disrupt transnational criminal organizations by limiting their ability to use Central America as a transit zone. From Jan. 15, 2012 to July 17, 2013, Operation Martillo, which was launched in January 2012, resulted in the seizure of 207,740 kilograms of cocaine and 37,397 kilograms of marijuana, 472 arrests and the confiscation of 152 assets. The Joint Interagency Task Force South and U.S. Southern Command will continue to work closely with partner nations through Operation Martillo, as 69% of the disruptions made during the past fiscal year were supported by a member nation. During the 2011 fiscal year, 59% of disruptions included a partner nation. The operation directly supports the curtailing of trafficking and the dismantlement of transnational criminal networks in Central America, which are key objectives of the Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI). “Operation Martillo demonstrates a clear commitment of the Western Hemisphere and European nations to work as partners to counter the spread of transnational criminal organizations, and to protect citizens in Central America from the violence, harm and exploitation created by these criminal networks,” the Joint Interagency Task Force South and U.S. Southern Command said in a prepared statement. Operation Martillo is integral to the counter-narcotics fight, as about 80% of cocaine shipments are moved via maritime routes. Nearly 90% of the cocaine that reaches the United States comes through Mexico and Central America, according to the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board. “Operation Martillo has been a huge success and demonstrates our clear commitment to work together with our partner nations and interagency community to combat the influence of organized crime and disrupt the flow of illicit drugs into the U.S.,” Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command, U.S. 4th Fleet, said in a prepared statement. “By teaming up with our partner nations and allied forces to scrutinize the littorals, our goal is to deny them the ability to transit so that the sea lines are not free for illicit traffic.” Partner nations are committed to Operation Martillo. “Canada has steadfast, growing relationships with the people and nations of the Caribbean and Central America,” Canadian Minister of State of Foreign Affairs Diane Ablonczy said in a prepared statement. “We are committed to building on those ties by sharing expertise and pooling our resources to tackle common threats such as international drug smuggling. By working together, we are achieving greater security and prosperity for our hemisphere.”last_img read more

PAHO helps Latin American nations prepare to fight Ebola

first_imgUruguay is requiring that all passengers arriving in the country must complete a questionnaire about their health status, the Uruguayan Ministry of Health told El Observador on October 9. If a case of Ebola is detected in a Latin American or Caribbean country, PAHO/WHO medical experts and representatives from the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) will be deployed to that nation, to assist national health authorities in carrying out their response plans. Creating an Ebola emergency fund, to pay for the high costs of treating patients infected with the virus. With the exception of a handful of cases in Europe and the United States, almost all Ebola patients have been stricken in Libera, Sierra Leone, and Guinea. In addition to participating in such meetings, PAHO/WHO is working closely with the health ministries of its member countries to ensure they have the necessary policies, procedures and human resource capacity in place to treat and contain Ebola. In Guatemala the government has installed thermal cameras at La Aurora International Airport, in the capital of the country, to detect the body temperature of passengers. A team of agents will work with the equipment 24 hours a day; if they identify someone with a fever, they’ll check the person’s passport to see whether the person had been in Africa, and then send them for a clinical exam. Depending on the case, the traveler may be quarantined, according to Guatemala’s Ministry of Health. For example, with technical support from PAHO, Honduran health officials have set up an International Health Surveillance Office (OSVI) at the Toncontín International Airport in Tegucigalpa. Similar offices will also be installed at airports in the cities of San Pedro Sula, La Ceiba and Roatán. In addition to participating in such meetings, PAHO/WHO is working closely with the health ministries of its member countries to ensure they have the necessary policies, procedures and human resource capacity in place to treat and contain Ebola. Monitoring suspected cases of Ebola among international travelers and in health centers. PAHO has created a special Ebola task force and operational working group to advise and support member nations in carrying out these recommendations: PAHO/WHO missions will visit member countries in November and December to assess how prepared those nations are to detect, treat, and contain any imported cases of the deadly virus. PAHO/WHO missions will visit member countries in November and December to assess how prepared those nations are to detect, treat, and contain any imported cases of the deadly virus. “There is a real risk that Ebola could be introduced into Latin America and the Caribbean,” Dr. Carissa F. Etienne, director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), told representatives of several South American nations at a conference in Havana October 20. “The region has to be properly prepared.” The Ebola epidemic has infected approximately 10,000 people and killed almost 5,000, almost all of them in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Symptoms include a high fever, headaches, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and general weakness – and may appear as late as 21 days after exposure. Those exposed to the virus are only infectious while they are suffering symptoms of the disease. Ebola is transmitted between humans via direct contact with bodily fluids and secretions. It can also be transmitted by contact with infected human corpses or infected animals, in addition to contaminated clothes, needles and other objects. With the exception of a handful of cases in Europe and the United States, almost all Ebola patients have been stricken in Libera, Sierra Leone, and Guinea. Chilean health officials recently convened a committee of doctors, including epidemiologists, to support the oversight and control efforts against Ebola, according to the Health Ministry. While PAHO plans for coordinated action against an Ebola outbreak, individual Latin American nations have prepared local response plans and procedures. Chilean health officials recently convened a committee of doctors, including epidemiologists, to support the oversight and control efforts against Ebola, according to the Health Ministry. For more information on PAHO guidelines, visit the website www.paho.org/ebola. Creating an Ebola emergency fund, to pay for the high costs of treating patients infected with the virus. In Guatemala the government has installed thermal cameras at La Aurora International Airport, in the capital of the country, to detect the body temperature of passengers. A team of agents will work with the equipment 24 hours a day; if they identify someone with a fever, they’ll check the person’s passport to see whether the person had been in Africa, and then send them for a clinical exam. Depending on the case, the traveler may be quarantined, according to Guatemala’s Ministry of Health. In Guatemala the government has installed thermal cameras at La Aurora International Airport, in the capital of the country, to detect the body temperature of passengers. A team of agents will work with the equipment 24 hours a day; if they identify someone with a fever, they’ll check the person’s passport to see whether the person had been in Africa, and then send them for a clinical exam. Depending on the case, the traveler may be quarantined, according to Guatemala’s Ministry of Health. If a case of Ebola is detected in a Latin American or Caribbean country, PAHO/WHO medical experts and representatives from the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) will be deployed to that nation, to assist national health authorities in carrying out their response plans. For more information on PAHO guidelines, visit the website www.paho.org/ebola. Conduct all laboratory tests in accordance with the best biosafety protocols. Communicate with the public by providing accurate information about the disease. By Dialogo November 05, 2014center_img For example, with technical support from PAHO, Honduran health officials have set up an International Health Surveillance Office (OSVI) at the Toncontín International Airport in Tegucigalpa. Similar offices will also be installed at airports in the cities of San Pedro Sula, La Ceiba and Roatán. PAHO/WHO officials are participating in a series of training sessions – both virtual and face-to-face – on such issues as logistics, preparedness, and communicating risks to the population. The training also involves the dissemination of protocols and guidelines for infection control and the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) to health officials and physicians in each country. PAHO/WHO is also providing guidance on how to safely collect and analyze samples with highly pathogenic agents, the best ways to conduct disease surveillance and laboratory procedures. Provide isolation rooms to treat patients infected with the virus, in specially designated health centers. PAHO/WHO officials are participating in a series of training sessions – both virtual and face-to-face – on such issues as logistics, preparedness, and communicating risks to the population. The training also involves the dissemination of protocols and guidelines for infection control and the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) to health officials and physicians in each country. PAHO/WHO is also providing guidance on how to safely collect and analyze samples with highly pathogenic agents, the best ways to conduct disease surveillance and laboratory procedures. In Guatemala the government has installed thermal cameras at La Aurora International Airport, in the capital of the country, to detect the body temperature of passengers. A team of agents will work with the equipment 24 hours a day; if they identify someone with a fever, they’ll check the person’s passport to see whether the person had been in Africa, and then send them for a clinical exam. Depending on the case, the traveler may be quarantined, according to Guatemala’s Ministry of Health. Conduct all laboratory tests in accordance with the best biosafety protocols. Almost all Ebola cases have been in West Africa International cooperation is crucial in containing Ebola, should a case appear in Latin America or the Caribbean. At the same time, invididual countries ust “take steps within their jurdiction, with the resources available” to prepare for the virus, Etienne said during a meeting of health care professionals in El Salvador on October 17. In Argentina, the Ministry of Health is enacting health protocols at international points of entry to identify people with infections. Before an airplane lands in Argentina, the plane’s crew must report to Argentinian health officials whether any passengers are displaying symptoms similar to Ebola, such as a high fever, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Argentina is also using a special diagnostic method for rapid confirmation of suspected cases of Ebola. PAHO, which serves as the regional Office of the Americas for the World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) is mobilizing teams of physicians and epidemiologists who are experienced in responding to outbreaks of disease to help member states in Central and South America and the Caribbean to respond to any cases of Ebola. Provide isolation rooms to treat patients infected with the virus, in specially designated health centers. Almost all Ebola cases have been in West Africa Communicate with the public by providing accurate information about the disease. While PAHO plans for coordinated action against an Ebola outbreak, individual Latin American nations have prepared local response plans and procedures. International cooperation is crucial in containing Ebola, should a case appear in Latin America or the Caribbean. At the same time, invididual countries ust “take steps within their jurdiction, with the resources available” to prepare for the virus, Etienne said during a meeting of health care professionals in El Salvador on October 17. Although there have as yet been no confirmed cases of the deadly Ebola virus in Latin America, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) is preparing to help health authorities to battle the disease if it appears in the region. “There is a real risk that Ebola could be introduced into Latin America and the Caribbean,” Dr. Carissa F. Etienne, director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), told representatives of several South American nations at a conference in Havana October 20. “The region has to be properly prepared.” PAHO, which serves as the regional Office of the Americas for the World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) is mobilizing teams of physicians and epidemiologists who are experienced in responding to outbreaks of disease to help member states in Central and South America and the Caribbean to respond to any cases of Ebola. In Argentina, the Ministry of Health is enacting health protocols at international points of entry to identify people with infections. Before an airplane lands in Argentina, the plane’s crew must report to Argentinian health officials whether any passengers are displaying symptoms similar to Ebola, such as a high fever, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Argentina is also using a special diagnostic method for rapid confirmation of suspected cases of Ebola. Monitoring suspected cases of Ebola among international travelers and in health centers. Uruguay is requiring that all passengers arriving in the country must complete a questionnaire about their health status, the Uruguayan Ministry of Health told El Observador on October 9. PAHO has created a special Ebola task force and operational working group to advise and support member nations in carrying out these recommendations: The Ebola epidemic has infected approximately 10,000 people and killed almost 5,000, almost all of them in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Symptoms include a high fever, headaches, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and general weakness – and may appear as late as 21 days after exposure. Those exposed to the virus are only infectious while they are suffering symptoms of the disease. Ebola is transmitted between humans via direct contact with bodily fluids and secretions. It can also be transmitted by contact with infected human corpses or infected animals, in addition to contaminated clothes, needles and other objects. Although there have as yet been no confirmed cases of the deadly Ebola virus in Latin America, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) is preparing to help health authorities to battle the disease if it appears in the region. International organizations such as Rotary, for example, if they are not already participating in the anti-Ebola crusade, they should be contacted to get involved due to their financial and human capacity as well as their huge networks of contacts in various countries on other continents, not only in Latin America. Wow, so sad.last_img read more

Salvadoran Army Trains Rescue Teams on Computer Simulators

first_imgIn that simulation, the flooding was caused by a storm, and the situation was elevated to red alert to provide FAES service members the opportunity to practice efficient and effective decision-making. The exercise allowed the participants to exercise judgment and evaluate a variety of pertinent elements to apply solutions. “From May 11-14, our officers participated in a simulation of a flood at the lower end of the Lempa River, covering the Departments of San Vicente and Usulután, where there are several communities that required assistance from our units and rescue teams,” said Colonel Mario Córdova Arriola, Coordinator of the FAES Logistics Sector Technical Committee. “In this training, we were able to plan responses and that lets us practice before a real emergency happens,” said Second Lieutenant Katerine Rodríguez, one of the participants in the exercise. “This way, we can react better and identify all the resources from FAES and other institutions to assist the population.” “The civilian population expects results from us … to take immediate action in this sort of situation, which can happen at any moment, especially now, when we are in the rainy season. The exercises complement the experiences we have had on the ground.” El Salvador Armed Forces (FAES) service members are using new technology to train for natural disasters and other emergencies when civilians rely on them for help: the Computerized Tactical Training Center (CETAC), which recreates realistic scenarios through precise mathematical models and complex calculations based on Salvadoran cartography. The FAES acquired its technological tools in 1995 from the Chilean Army’s Manufacturers and Armory (FAMAE); however, it had to develop modifications to the system to adjust it to local needs after the 2001 earthquakes changed the country’s geography and damaged its highway system. Such simulations — where factors such as environment, time, threats, Troop deployment, resources and terrain can be controlled – reduce FAES operating costs compared to doing the simulation with real resources. CETAC, which is is located in a modern building at the Doctrine and Military Education Command (CODEM), has the capacity to simultaneously train two teams of 36 service members each. By Dialogo June 19, 2015center_img “The simulators can be programmed for a variety of purposes, such as installation of bridges or repairs to obstructed roadways, as well as tracking statistical controls of available human resources and the materials used during the exercise,” Colonel Córdova Arriola said. A regional vision Flood simulation Lieutenant Commander Humberto Samayoa, another Officer participating in the training, noted the operational readiness and professionalism of the Military Rescue Brigades, who are committed to serving civilians. The new CETAC director, Colonel Jaime Ruiz Chávez, hopes to conduct the exercises with teams of Officers from the region through the Central American Armed Forces Conference (CFAC). In particular, the country’s rainy winters bring with them the frequent threat of flooding, creating dangerous, chaotic situations that the FAES needs to prepare for beforehand. That’s where the simulations created by CETAC, like one that took place in mid-May, prove their value. “This unit enjoys international prestige and we want to place it at the service of the region,” he said. “Therefore, we are going to work on improving the simulator, including maps of Central America, so that we can conduct these exercises with Military units from allied nations.”last_img read more

Dominican Armed Forces Conduct Joint Training to Optimize Capabilities

first_imgBy Dialogo January 26, 2016 Terrorism is not the only threat facing the Dominican Republic. Because of its geographic location, international drug-trafficking groups use the country as a transshipment point for illegal narcotics from South America intended for North America and Europe, Pou stated. Because of these threats, “it is essential to train the Armed Forces so they can be successful in the fight against terrorism and organized crime,” Brig. Gen. Guerrero stated. Two hundred fifty-two service members from the Armed Forces participated in the training exercise, during which two Super Tucano AD29 planes, 15 ground transportation vehicles, a UH1H helicopter, a Navy patrol boat, two Coast Guard cutters, and three interceptors were deployed. While these and other training exercises allow Army, Air Force, and Navy service members to maintain their Military capabilities and operational skills, the joint mission gave service members the opportunity to improve communications among the Military branches. Military authorities are adapting to evolving threats and challenges. The 2015 joint training exercises focused on combating unconventional threats, such as terrorists. In previous years, similar operations were designed to prepare service members to engage in combat with a conventional Military force. The Military conducted amphibious and security incursions at port facilities, employing commandos from the Dominican Navy, and air support in the form of a helicopter from the Dominican Air Force’s (FAD) Special Forces Command. Inter-Agency Task Force units, Marines, and Navy surface forces conducted the interdictions with FAD support. Members of the Counterterrorism Special Commando Unit neutralized terrorist cells during an exercise that included the Marines’ 1st Battalion and FAD Special Forces. In response to the November 13th terrorist attacks in Paris, in which Islamist extremists killed 129 people and wounded hundreds, the Special Airport and Aviation Security Corps in the Dominican Republic reinforced its security systems at air terminals. In addition to taking such precautions, it is important that security forces also train to confront terrorist threats, Pou explained. “The Armed Forces need to be on general alert and trained to react efficiently when faced with any threat of a crime.” “The Armed Forces are changing the Military’s training curriculum and operations so we can confront what are known today as emerging threats: terrorism, drug trafficking … human trafficking, environmental damage, and natural and man-made disasters,” Brig. Gen. Guerrero said. “We are filling different roles than those we had in the past.” In February, the Dominican Military will host joint training operation Dunas 2016 During the training mission, service members engaged in simulated exercises in which they battled a terrorist cell, protected a port, and dismantled a drug-trafficking operation. During the operation, the three branches of the Armed Forces deployed ground and air reconnaissance patrols at Isla Beata, Puerto en Medio, Cabo Pequeño, and Juancho. They also performed ground, sea, and air incursions to extract non-combatants in Barahona. The Dominican Republic’s Army, Navy, and Air Force recently conducted End of Year Joint Exercises that included simulated operations on the ground, air, and sea, including port security exercises against terrorist cells and drug-trafficking organizations. Maintaining optimal communications between all of the Armed Forces is crucial, according to Daniel Pou, associate analyst and researcher at the Latin American School of Social Sciences in the Dominican Republic. “Currently, 50 percent of all Military operations are dependent on the quality and efficacy of our communications.” International terrorists could have the Dominican Republic in their sights as a target for attacks like the ones that occurred in the French capital, Rubén Moreta, a professor of sociology at the Autonomous University of Santo Domingo, told the Al Momento website on November 20th. “Fundamentalist Islamic groups do not exempt anyplace on the planet when making their demands using violent methods,” he said. “The Dominican Republic is a Caribbean paradise, an international tourist mecca that welcomes 5.5 million visitors a year, mostly from economically robust nations that al-Qaeda, ISIS, and other fundamentalist organizations believe are infidels and declared to be their enemy.” Preparing for terrorism, organized crime During some of the exercises, “we noticed some failures in communications between one branch of the Military and another,” Brig. Gen. Guerrero explained. “However, the Dominican Republic’s Military commanders were able to make budgetary arrangements and adjustments to correct these anomalies.” To prepare to counter drug trafficking and other threats, the Dominican Republic’s Military branches have not only conducted joint training exercises with each other but also with other countries. For example, in December, they took part in a joint training exercise with the United States Southern Command simulating the interdiction of a drug-trafficking vessel. The Ministry of Defense has been conducting similar exercises for 10 years, but the recent operation marked the first time the Army, Navy, and Air Force all engaged in joint training together. The National Directorate for Drug Control, which is the lead agency in the fight against drug trafficking and related offenses, was included in the training exercises that were held from November 16th-30th, Brig. Gen. Guerrero added. with French Military service members. Like all joint training exercises, it will provide Dominican Military authorities the opportunity to evaluate the Military’s progress, Brig. Gen. Guerrero said. No plan to counter terrorists or drugs could be successful without a true intelligence structure whose importance falls under tactical planning operations. To have this, social action plans first have to be implemented to align citizens with operative forces. The only way to access information that could be useful to plan effective and deterrent operations against organized crime It’s good that we prepare ourselves so we won’t be caught by surprise. Great for the Armed Forces. We have to help the people I want to go to that school very good I congratulate you Terrorism and drug trafficking “The Armed Forces must be prepared to conduct joint operations; one institution alone cannot fulfill this role,” Dominican Army Brigadier General Santo Domingo Guerrero Clase, the Ministry of Defense’s Director of Planning and Operations, J-3, told Diálogo. “The goal is to increase our response capacity so that we can confront events that could endanger the continuance of our institutions and the maintenance of governance and democracy.” last_img read more

Uruguay Hosts COJUMA for the First Time

first_imgBy Diálogo July 14, 2016 For the first time, Uruguay co-hosted the Americas’ premier legal workshop, the Military Legal Committee of the Americas (COJUMA) from May 23rd thru 26th. Founded in 1995, COJUMA is a multilateral organization sponsored by U.S. Southern Command’s (SOUTHCOM) Office of the Staff Judge Advocate. COJUMA’s mandate is to develop practical tools to overcome the most pressing legal issues facing commanders across the Western Hemisphere. Legal issues range from the use of force to responsibilities under United Nations mission mandate to protection of civilians to sexual abuse and exploitation. This year’s COJUMA focused on legal issues during peacekeeping operations. During the four-day workshop, participants from across the hemisphere dissected the legal and policy issues confronting troop contributing countries across the globe. To gain a better understanding of the issues, the participants also attended presentations at Uruguay’s National School of Peacekeeping Operations, or ENOPU, as well as a field demonstration put on by the Ministry of Defense. In an interview with Diálogo, Uruguayan Army Colonel Niver Pereira, ENOPU director, said the seminar was very useful for ENOPU because of its functions and needs. “The event was successful for a variety of reasons: the coverage of topics, the quality of presentations, and the participating audience, in addition to the legal issues and possible solutions that were identified to resolve them.” Samuel Londoño, Chief of International Law at SOUTHCOM’s Office of the Staff Judge Advocate, told Diálogo, “COJUMA was a success. Participants recommended that troop contributing countries deploy with their legal advisors to navigate the complexities of today’s peacekeeping operations. The UN representative in attendance said COJUMA’s recommendation of using legal advisors should become a global best practice.” “The expectations of the majority of participants prior to the seminar were to establish contacts, exchange experiences with other countries, and get guidance for action, and all the objectives were met,” added Col. Pereira. The complexity of peacekeeping operations, as well as the number of operations, is expected to grow, thereby, increasing the need for a clear legal and policy framework and effective institutional control mechanisms. “For those of us working on the field in peace keeping missions, the evolution of the measures of performance, particularly in the use of force, as well as the importance of sexual exploitation and abuse topics, the approach and improvement of legal frameworks is an important issue,” said Col. Pereira. History COJUMA was born from the collaboration of eight countries in Central and South America in Panama City, Panama. Today, COJUMA counts on 24 member nations and, to date, it has produced seminal works ranging from military justice to international agreements to creating a blueprint for model military legal corps.last_img read more