Jamaica claim hurdles, sprint relay records at Carifta Games

first_img Countrywoman Jamaica’s Shannon Kallawan broke a 13-year-old mark, while Shian Salmon and the boys’ Under-18 4×100 metres relay team of Michael Stephens, Christopher Taylor, Jhevaughn Matherson, and Dejour Russell were in record-breaking form at the 45th Carifta Games in St George’s, Grenada, yesterday. Jamaica ended at the national Athletics Stadium on the penultimate day with 52 medals – 24 gold, 17 silver, and 11 bronze. Kallawan took the girls’ Under-20 400 metres hurdles in 56.21 seconds, erasing the 56.61 done by Jamaica’s Camille Robinson in 2003. Lakeisha Warner of the British Virgin Island (BVI) finished second in 58.14, while Jamaica’s Nicolee Foster took bronze in 58.34. Jamaica swept the sprint relays, garnished with a record run of 40.40 seconds in the Under-18 boys’ event. Salmon won her second gold medal with a record run in the girls 400m hurdles. Secured a quinella After winning the Under-18 high jump on Saturday, Salmon got the better of teammate Sanique Walker, winning in 59.50 seconds to break the one- year record of 59.55 seconds done by countrywoman Junelle Bromfield in St Kitts. Walker, who finished second a year ago, again copped silver in 59.60 seconds. Gabrielle Gibson of Bahamas finished third in 1:01.16. The quartet of Dazgay Freeman, Shaniel English, Michae Harriott, and Kimone Shaw won the girls’ Under-18 4×100 metres in 45.87 seconds ahead of Bahamas, 46.37, and Trinidad and Tobago, 47.27. The star-studded boys’ team erased the 40.52-second record set by Jamaica last year. The Under-20 girls’ quartet of Kimone Hinds, Patrice Moody, Shanice Reid, and Rushelle Burton won in 44.36, while the boys – Rohan Cole, Nigel Ellis, Raheem Chambers, and Akeem Bloomfield – clocked 39.74 seconds. Bahamas were second in 40.27 seconds, with Barbados third in 40.97. It was three out of four for Jamaica in the Intermediate hurdle events. Timor Barrett, 51.79, stole the spotlight from teammate Jauvaney James, 52.07, in the Under-20 boys event. Barbados Rivaldo Leacock was third in 53.56. Barbados, however, took gold and silver in the Under-18 boys’ event through Rasheema Griffiths (52.22) and Nathan Ferguson (53.36). Jamaica’s Dashinelle Dyer was third in 54.05 seconds. In the girl’s Open 3000 metres, Jamaica’s Britnie dixon (10:57.05) and Monifa Green secured a quinella. Elizabeth Williams of Barbados won bronze. Jamaica also picked up gold in the final individual track event of the day, the boys’ Under-18 3000 metres as defending champion Keenan Lawrence outwitted Dominic Dyer out of The Cayman Islands to win in 9:05.71. Dyer was second in 9:06.33, with third going to Kallique St Jean of Antigua and Barbuda in 9:11.49. In the field events, Zico Campbell took the boys’ Under-18 shot put gold with 17.75 metres, erasing the old mark of 17.56m set in 2015 by Isaiah Taylor of Trinidad and Tobago. Campbell’s teammate, Rasheda Downer, captured silver with 17.57m, as Barbados’ Triston Gibbons took bronze with 16.64m. In the morning session, Jamaica’s Aiko Jones won the Under-18 girls’ discus gold medal with a throw of 46.49m to go along with the bronze in the shot put on Saturday’s opening day. Jamaica won gold and bronze in the girls’ Under-18 long jump as Vere Technical’s Britany Anderson (6.02m) won and Annia Ashley finished third with 5.91m. Guyana’s Chantoba Bright (5.94m) won silver. In the girls’ Open heptathlon, Junelle Fullerton won gold for Jamaica after amassing 4,597 points. Her teammate, Zinadine Russell (4,524), won silver. In the Under-20 200m preliminaries, Jamaica’s Ellis and Reid were disqualified from the boys’ and girls’ events for false-starting.last_img read more

Paleoanthropologist Exposes Shoddiness of “Early Man” Research

first_imgMany paleoanthropologists are bent on self-promotion, and the field lacks ability to regulate itself, a veteran researcher complains.Tim White of UC Berkeley took the occasion of the Leakey team’s promotion of a new juvenile hominid jaw to point out troubles in the field.  Writing in Current Biology with palpable sarcasm, he made comments that should cause concern among those trusting proclamations about human evolution made by researchers and their press agents.  Here are some samples:Human bones are common in cemeteries, but remains of our more ancient ancestors and relatives are fewer, further between and notoriously difficult to recover. This is particularly true for fossils that are millions of years old. Biomolecules are geologically short-lived and thus unavailable for parsing truly ancient species lineages.Disagreements are common, and the configuration of the hominid twig on the tree of life remains a matter of particular contention….Kenyan fossils announced in Nature have historically figured prominently in paleoanthropology. In their latest paper of this genre, Leakey et al. introduce the fossilized partial maxilla of an ancient juvenile….  This new paper’s conclusions are said to confirm the authors’ earlier published conclusions….The authors take an unusual approach to constructing, in 3-D digital space, what they think the dental arcade of the new fossil maxilla should have looked like. They accomplish this feat by filling the fossil’s empty and broken tooth sockets with digital models of modern human teeth. Why modern human teeth were better suited than available contemporary fossil teeth is left unexplained.The unilineal depiction of human evolution popularized by the familiar iconography of an evolutionary ‘march to modern man’ has been proven wrong for more than 60 years. However, the cartoon continues to provide a popular straw man for scientists, writers and editors alike. Do most of these species labels reflect real, biologically distinct lineages? Or have the alleged species proliferated merely as a result of taxonomic exuberance misapplied to within-species variation (idiosyncratic, geographic, sexual, and/or ontogenetic)? The sequence of prominent paleoanthropological publications across the last decades reveals a pattern of diversity promotion.Paleoanthropology’s ecosystem of publishing, access, fundraising, career advancement, media promotion and celebrity seems squarely aligned against the field’s ability to self regulate, a condition exacerbated by the limited fossil resources available. There is ample and obvious motivation for authors to generate ‘new’ species names in this environment. Readers should, therefore, beware of attendant species diversity claims. Illegitimate names have become part and parcel of the symbiosis itself. Furthermore, ‘chronospecies’ are merely artificial segments of evolving species lineages, rather than truly separate species. Such assertions of biological species diversity via taxonomic hyperbole are questionable representations of the real paleobiology of our ancestors and their few close, now extinct biological relatives. Despite the branch waving, our family tree still resembles a saguaro cactus more than a creosote bush.So is there a credible story growing out of research into human origins in spite of the personality conflicts and pet theories?  White ended by complaining that funding agencies are strangling long-term field research in favor of expensive lab equipment.  “More fossils will be needed” to resolve the current conflicts, he complained.  “Until a better balance is achieved — and better biological understanding applied — the origins of our genus will remain shrouded by a paucity of paleobiological data.”It’s so nice when one of their own writes the commentary for us.  We especially enjoyed #5 and #8.  Thank you, Tim White.  Now get a real job dealing with something you can know. (Visited 37 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Falcons strengthen grip of 3rd spot, rout Bulldogs

first_imgQC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort After trailing 72-48 heading into the fourth, the Bulldogs managed to cut the deficit to nine, 79-70, with J-Jay Alejandro capping off a 22-7 run with a three-pointer 2:57 left in the game.The Falcons, though, kept its composure and answered back to take a 13-point lead, 85-72, after Jerrick Ahanmisi drilled a long two-pointer with 1:52 left.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutAdamson head coach Franz Pumaren, though, wasn’t happy with the way his team handled the lead late into the game.“We’re not that good of a team to relax, we got that lead because we played the way we we’re supposed to do,” said Pumaren. Read Next FILE – Adamson guard Jerrick Ahanmisi. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAdamson University tightened its hold of the third spot after scoring a commanding 90-77 win over National University in the UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball tournament Sunday at Mall of Asia Arena.The Soaring Falcons picked up their second straight win and improved to 8-4 while the Bulldogs are at solo sixth with a 4-7 record after missing a chance to tie Far Eastern University and University of the Philippines for the fourth spot.ADVERTISEMENT For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles03:43Pagasa: LPA strengthens into Tropical Depression ‘Perla’02:28UAAP Season 80 Preview: NU Bulldogs01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 MOST READ Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa LATEST STORIES Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH NU eyes share of UAAP Cheerdance history; UP back View comments “When we let our egos get involved, that [blown lead] could happen, we’re just lucky we were up 20-plus points at the start of the fourth.”Ahanmisi and Jonathan Espeleta led Adamson with 16 points apiece while Papi Sarr had a 14-point, 12-rebound double-double. Alejandro led the Bulldogs with 18 points and 10 rebounds while Rev Diputado added 14 points.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

a month agoTottenham lose Hugo Lloris before Leicester kickoff

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Tottenham lose Hugo Lloris before Leicester kickoffby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham lost Hugo Lloris before kickoff against Leicester City.He was forced to rush back to London to attend the birth of his child.Lloris was due to start but left the team hotel on Saturday morning to be by his wife’s side in hospital, meaning Spurs have had to make a late selection change.Back-up goalkeeper Paulo Gazzaniga has replaced Lloris between the posts, as the 27-year-old makes just his 13th appearance since joining the club in August 2017. last_img

Video: Two Kentucky Fans Recorded “Big Blue Train,” A Bluegrass Ode To The Undefeated Wildcats

first_imgKentucky fans play bluegrass song about Wildcats.When you’re undefeated and dominating the competition like No. 1 Kentucky is, you’re bound to inspire passionate fans to drum up unique ways to express their love and appreciation. What better way for two fans to show their devotion to UK basketball than with a little Bluegrass tribute?That’s what the Jenkins twins decided to do. They recorded a musical ode to their beloved Wildcats, complete with shout outs of every key player, and jokes about Roy Williams, Rick Pitino and Bill Self drinking vodka. The chorus of the song features the line “We’re going to ‘Nap town on this Big Blue Train.” It’s a reference to Indianapolis, or ‘Nap Town, where the 2015 Final Four will be held.All in all, it’s entertaining in a quirky and hilarious way. [H/T : @KySportsRadio ]last_img read more

Former FSU RB Devonta Freeman Calls Out Cameraman Wearing Florida Gators Shirt

first_imgFlorida State players wait behind a banner before running onto the field.PASADENA, CA – JANUARY 01: A general view during the College Football Playoff Semifinal between the Florida State Seminoles and the Oregon Ducks at the Rose Bowl Game presented by Northwestern Mutual at the Rose Bowl on January 1, 2015 in Pasadena, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Former Florida State running back Devonta Freeman has done the Seminoles proud, rushing for 811 yards through 11 games for the Atlanta Falcons. But Freeman will likely find himself as a fan favorite in Tallahassee for another reason this week.In the team’s locker room this past Friday, Freeman called out a cameraman who was wearing Florida Gators gear. Freeman found a roll of black tape and covered up the logo. Check it out:So this happened today @devontafreeman @AHittel pic.twitter.com/jeXktGa4N8— Ashley Rose (@AshleyTVRose) December 4, 2015Well-played, for sure. We imagine the cameraman won’t be making the same mistake next time around.last_img read more

Photo: Jim Harbaugh Hung Out With Hank Aaron While Wearing His Jersey Ahead Of Today’s Camp In Atlanta

first_imgJim Harbaugh MichiganJim Harbaugh MichiganJim Harbaugh and his staff are down in Atlanta for today’s satellite camp with Georgia at Cedar Grove High School, but beforehand, he took the chance to meet a local legend. Harbaugh sat down with Atlanta Braves great Hank Aaron, while wearing his jersey.Jim Harbaugh’s local attire for today’s Atlanta camp: Braves’ jersey of Hank Aaron. While sitting next to Hank Aaron pic.twitter.com/IeRfdesrLl— Mark Snyder (@Mark__Snyder) June 2, 2016The best part? He’s wearing the jersey while conducting the actual camp.Hank Aaron, former mayor/civil rights leader Andrew Young and Jim Harbaugh talking to campers pic.twitter.com/F5Q6U6YLCG— Mark Snyder (@Mark__Snyder) June 2, 2016Never change, Harbaugh.last_img

Israeli firm says it can turn garbage into biobased plastic

first_imgKIBBUTZ ZEELIM, Israel – Hawks, vultures and storks circle overhead as Christopher Sveen points at the heap of refuse rotting in the desert heat. “This is the mine of the future,” he beams.Sveen is chief sustainability officer at UBQ, an Israeli company that has patented a process to convert household trash, diverting waste from landfills into reusable bio-based plastic.After five years of development, the company is bringing its operations online, with hopes of revolutionizing waste management and being a driver to make landfills obsolete. It remains to be seen, however, if the technology really works and is commercially viable.UBQ operates a pilot plant and research facility on the edge of southern Israel’s Negev Desert, where it has developed its production line.“We take something that is not only not useful, but that creates a lot of damage to our planet, and we’re able to turn it into the things we use every day,” said Albert Douer, UBQ’s executive chairman. He said UBQ’s material can be used as a substitute for conventional petrochemical plastics and wood, reducing oil consumption and deforestation.UBQ has raised $30 million from private investors, including Douer, who is also chief executive of Ajover Darnel Group, an international plastics conglomerate.Leading experts and scientists serve on its advisory board, including Nobel Prize chemist Roger Kornberg, Hebrew University biochemist Oded Shoseyov, author and entrepreneur John Elkington and Connie Hedegaard, a former European Commissioner for Climate Action.The small plant can process one ton of municipal waste per hour, a relatively small amount that would not meet the needs of even a midsize city. But UBQ says that given the modularity, it can be quickly expanded.On a recent day, UBQ Chief Executive Tato Bigio stood alongside bales of sorted trash hauled in from a local landfill.He said recyclable items like glass, metals and minerals are extracted and sent for further recycling, while the remaining garbage — “banana peels, the chicken bones and the hamburger, the dirty plastics, the dirty cartons, the dirty papers” — is dried and milled into a powder.The steely grey powder then enters a reaction chamber, where it is broken down and reconstituted as a bio-based plastic-like composite material. UBQ says its closely-guarded patented process produces no greenhouse gas emissions or residual waste byproducts, and uses little energy and no water.According to the United Nations Environment Program, 5 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions are produced by decomposing organic material in landfills. Roughly half is methane, which over two decades is 86 times as potent for global warming as carbon dioxide, according to the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.For every ton of material produced, UBQ says it prevents between three and 30 tons of CO2 from being created by keeping waste out of landfills and decomposing.UBQ says its material can be used as an additive to conventional plastics. It says 10-15 per cent is enough to make a plastic carbon-neutral by offsetting the generation of methane and carbon dioxide in landfills. It can be moulded into bricks, beams, planters, cans, and construction materials. Unlike most plastics, UBQ says its material doesn’t degrade when it’s recycled.The company says converting waste into marketable products is profitable, and likely to succeed in the long run without government subsidies.“What we do is we try to position ourselves at the end of the value chain, or at the end of the waste management hierarchy,” Sveen said. “So rather than that waste going to a landfill or being incinerated, that’s kind of our waste feedstock.”The wonder plastic isn’t without its skeptics, however. Duane Priddy, chief executive of the Plastic Expert Group, said UBQ’s claims were “too good to be true” and likened it to alchemy.“Chemists have been trying to convert lead to gold for centuries, without success,” Priddy, a former principal scientist at Dow Chemical, said in an email to The Associated Press. “Likewise, chemists have been trying to convert garbage to plastic for several decades.”UBQ said it is confident its technology will prove the skeptics wrong. “We understand that’s people’s perceptions. We hope to convince them in a professional and scientific manner,” Sveen said.Even if its technology is ultimately successful, UBQ faces questions about its long-term viability. Building additional plants could be expensive and time-consuming. It also needs to prove there is a market for its plastic products. The company said it is negotiating deals with major customers, but declined to identify them or say when the contracts would go into effect.The U.N. Environment Program has made solid waste disposal a central issue to combatting pollution worldwide. Landfills contaminate air, water and soil, and take up limited land and resources. A December 2017 report by the international body devoted five of its 50 anti-pollution measures to reducing and processing solid waste.“Every year, an estimated 11.2 billion tons of solid waste are collected worldwide,” the organization says. “The solution, in the first place, is the minimization of waste. Where waste cannot be avoided, recovery of materials and energy from waste as well as remanufacturing and recycling waste into usable products should be the second option.”Israel lags behind other developed countries in waste disposal. The country of roughly 8 million people generated 5.3 million metric tons of garbage in 2016, according to the Environment Ministry. Over 80 per cent of that trash ended up in increasingly crowded landfills. A third of Israel’s landfill garbage is food scraps, which decompose and produce greenhouse gases like methane and carbon dioxide.To UBQ, that means a nearly limitless supply of raw material.“The fact is that the majority of waste goes to a landfill or is leaked into our natural environments because there simply aren’t holistic and economically viable technologies out there,” said Sveen.last_img read more

Progress being made on establishing a nursing school in Northeast BC

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Officials with the Peace River Regional District and the provincial government say that progress is being made on getting a nursing school established in Fort St. John.The news comes on the tail of last Wednesday’s announcement that the provincial government had approved the concept plan for major upgrades to the Dawson Creek Hospital. During that announcement, Health Minister Adrian Dix acknowledged the hospital’s staff who “a great place, regardless of what the facilities are like.”“We owe it to them to ensure that they practice the passion of their lives – caring for people – in the best possible facilities,” said Dix. While the newly-renovated hospital might provide a less stressful facility for healthcare workers, B.C. Auditor General Carol Bellringer said earlier this year that new facilities alone won’t solve issues with recruitment and retention of healthcare workers in Northeast B.C.In February, Bellringer released a report which said that Northern Health was not doing enough to recruit and retain registered nurses, especially in the northeast part of the province. As part of her recommendations, Bellringer said that establishing a nursing school in Northeast B.C. would help to better recruit and retain nurses in this part of the province.Weeks before Bellringer released the report, Fort St. John mayor Lori Ackerman said that talks on getting a nursing school established in Fort St. John were progressing, saying she expected to hear back from the provincial government in the Spring.Peace River Regional District Chair Brad Sperling, who was also at last week’s announcement, said that the latest news from the provincial government came at the North Central Local Government Association annual general meeting in Fort Nelson in May.“The program was virtually together and ready to go,” said Sperling. “That was in the beginning of May and they were hoping to have that down there in June. They did ask me if I would be prepared to head down there on a moment’s notice and the Board did approve that. Right now we’re just waiting to hear, but hopefully it’s on its way to the Minister.”last_img read more

OSU building foundation up the middle

All good baseball teams are built up the middle. At any level, the teams who succeed have a strong core built around their catcher, middle infielders — shortstop and second baseman — and center fielder. Managers and coaches openly admit having good defensive players at those key positions is crucial to a team’s success. But these defensive stars are rare commodities.Look at the world champion New York Yankees. Their ability to win five World Series titles since 1996 is no secret. The core of all those Yankees teams was up the middle. Jorge Posada behind the plate, perennial all-star Derek Jeter at short and Bernie Williams patrolling center field, for all but the last of the Yankees championships.The Philadelphia Phillies, who have been to the past two World Series, are built the same way. Shane Victorino in center, Chase Utley and Jimmy Rollins up the middle and Carlos Ruiz catching. Those four anchor the team and are in large part responsible for the Phillies’ dominance in the National League.Finding players at those positions as good with the bat as they are with the glove is even more rare. That’s why players like Jeter, Rollins and Utley are regarded as some of the best in the game.Having strength up the middle translates to success in the college game as well.“If you’re strong up the middle, I think it makes your team as a whole more solid,” Michael Stephens said. Stephens is Ohio State’s everyday centerfielder. “Every team in the nation that does really well has strong up the middle chemistry,” Stephens explained.So for the Ohio State baseball team to be able to boast outstanding players at each of the four positions is an incredible feat. The Buckeyes are both strong and experienced up the middle, the perfect storm for a team looking to claim a second consecutive Big Ten title.Stephens patrols center field for the Buckeyes, Tyler Engle and Cory Kovanda make up the middle infield and Dan Burkhart takes on the catching duties. Coach Bob Todd understands the importance of keeping that foursome in the line up. “We need all those guys to stay healthy. They give us quality play out there,” Todd said.The Junior College transfer Stephens is in his second year in the Ohio State program, but his final year of eligibility.The California native spent his first two seasons at Fullerton College — a junior college close to his hometown of Victorville, Calif. Stephens says there were many factors that influenced his decision to come to Ohio State, but one that stands out above the rest.“We travel and we get to play everywhere,” Stephens said. “Going down to Florida in the spring is a huge benefit.”Stephens elected to come to OSU due, in large part, to the amount the Buckeyes travel. He explained if he would have gone to a school like Cal State Fullerton, he would have played a majority of his games in Southern California against the same competition.His decision to come to OSU was to the delight of his teammates.“Stephens is great,” Engle said. “He plays a good center field and he’s clutch at the plate too.”Stephens immediately fit into the Buckeyes lineup and has earned his spot in a talented outfield. Last season he started all 61 games for the Buckeyes and is a key contributor in this his senior campaign.The dynamic duoWhen it comes to middle infielders, experience is the key. And that is exactly what Engle and Kovanda, a junior and a senior respectively, possess. This is the third year the tandem has played side-by-side for the Buckeyes, and their chemistry is evident.“Kovanda and Engle have done a great job defensively for us,” Todd said of the duo.Engle and Kovanda’s connection extends beyond the baseball field.“We’re great friends. We get along great,” Engle said. “With our busy schedules in the spring it’s tough, but we make it a point to hang out.” Their time spent together on and off the field is evident in their play as they combine to be the best double-play combo in the Big Ten.“We’re kind of in each other’s minds,” Engle said. “We both have a lot of confidence turning double plays, even the tough ones.”The backstopWhen talking OSU baseball, the conversation begins and ends with catcher Dan Burkhart.He has become a mainstay behind the plate for the Buckeyes. In his first year with the program Burkhart became the first freshman to start at catcher in nearly two decades. Now, as a junior, he’s collecting accolades on a seemingly weekly basis.Burkhart is the reigning Big Ten Player of the Year and was second-team preseason All-American. As Todd simply stated, “He’s the backbone of this team. There’s no doubt about it.”Burkhart demonstrates why he’s earned that title every game he suits up for the Buckeyes.The catcher handles the pitching staff beautifully, especially ace Alex Wimmers, who was his high school teammate. And Burkhart does it all defensively by blocking balls and throwing out base runners.“He’s a stud. You couldn’t ask for anything else behind the plate,” Engle said of Burkhart. “I wouldn’t have anybody else in the country.”At the plateWhat might be most impressive about the foursome isn’t what they do defensively, but rather on offense. Kovanda, Stephens and Burkhart make up the heart of the Buckeyes order, hitting second, third and fourth.Kovanda is near the top of the team leaders with a .379 batting average and Stephens’ eight home runs are top among the Buckeyes. And although Engle usually fills in the ninth spot in the line up, he’s a consistent contributor and serves as a second lead-off hitter.The foursome’s contributions on both sides of the ball clearly demonstrate that their play will dictate how far the Buckeyes are able to go this season. read more