Weekly unemployment claims fall 36 percent

first_imgWeekly unemployment claims declined dramatically last week after increasing the previous two weeks. For the week of March 6, 2010, there were 897 new regular benefit claims for Unemployment Insurance, a decrease of 498 from the week before. Altogether 15,463 new and continuing claims were filed, a decrease of 54 from a week ago and 2,814 fewer than a year earlier. The Department also processed 4,647 First Tier claims for benefits under Emergency Unemployment Compensation, 2008 (EUC08), 96 fewer than a week ago. In addition, there were 3,389 Second Tier claims for benefits processed under the EUC08 program, which is an increase of 32 from the week before. The Unemployment Weekly Report can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/(link is external). Previously released Unemployment Weekly Reports and other UI reports can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/lmipub.htm#uc(link is external)last_img read more

The value of distributed leadership at credit unions

first_imgRegulations, cyber security, EMV migration, low interest rates, technology and competition. These are just a few of the issues concerning community-based financial institutions as they strive to be competitive or make the transition to becoming a larger institution. With all of that on their plates, I am nonetheless dismayed that one crucial area that lacks attention in a credit union’s quest for success is how to maintain a level of leadership that is capable of guiding it for the long-term.Don’t get me wrong, there are countless examples of credit unions that put a lot of time and effort into searching for and recruiting individuals with certain qualifications to fill specific roles when there is an opening due to a retirement or resignation. But when it comes to effectively distributing leadership throughout the organization consistently – and having a plan to ensure a legacy of long-term leadership – the anecdotes are more difficult to uncover.The precedent begins at the topLet’s begin at the very top. In today’s rapidly changing business and regulatory environment, credit unions need strong board leadership that represents the membership, is knowledgeable about key issues that are concerning to regulators and is committed to the credit union’s long-term strategic direction. While maintaining board membership with this level of expertise and involvement takes a commitment and on-going planning by both existing internal and external leadership, failure to do so can result in costly consequences.My advice to credit unions of all sizes is to look at the existing board roster and determine if this important leadership segment reflects the current member profile or represents who the organization served 20 years ago. Do members have a thorough understanding of the technology and compliance issues facing the credit union? Do they have the financial knowledge and skill necessary to make prudent business decisions that can affect long-term viability? Do they have an appreciation for the next generation of members and the solutions they are likely to see as valuable?Depending on how you answer these questions, it may be time to think about how board members are evaluated, what educational opportunities are available or need to be provided, and whether or not it may be time to think about instituting necessary changes in order to maintain strong leadership at the top.Are the folks that “got you here” capable of “getting you there”?A common dilemma I frequently see when counseling clients is when the leadership needs of an organization gradually exceed the capabilities of its current management. For instance, while an entrepreneurial CEO, budding CFO or capable controller did an outstanding job of getting a new start-up on the map, as the organization grows the skills that were effective in the beginning are no longer applicable or scalable as the challenges increase and the risks become greater. This can be especially troubling if existing leadership is entrenched in the idea that their way of doing business or their vision for the organization’s future is the only one that matters.If allowed to continue, this situation prevents the creation of a more productive work environment, hinders talented staff from reaching their potential and creates unnecessary attrition – which can ultimately lead to a loss of members if the level of service declines or the credit union fails to keep up with service options provided by competitors.Strengthening the chain of commandAnother – and perhaps longer term – dimension of the equation is the need for leadership development beyond the C-Suite as a credit union grows. Maintaining a strong presence in the market or fulfilling a strategic goal of growth occurs more organically when leadership talent is developed internally with people who are familiar with the organization and its members. This includes people in middle management – along with others who possess leadership potential – who are working “in the trenches” every day, who are committed to the mission, vision and values of the credit union, and who can effectively serve as examples to those employees who are in contact with members on a daily basis.When working with clients who are interested in building collaborative environments, I tell them it is their responsibility to actively share what they know, communicate what they expect and in every way possible instill their vision for the credit union’s future in the people who are likely to pass it along to their co-workers. Otherwise, management becomes the bottleneck that stifles leadership development, blocks the flow of ideas from the folks who are most connected to what members are saying and slows the organization’s ability to be nimble in an ever-changing environment.There will be times when allowing less experienced managers to make leadership decisions will lead to a mistake or two. However, you have to be able to trust your people to take actions based on the credit union’s mission, vision and values to serve your members’ needs.Two heads are better than oneSo the next time you find yourself in a situation where a decision needs to be made – whether the situation is beyond your span of control or comfort zone, or requires more time than you have available – I encourage you to consider involving others in the decision-making process. As the old saying goes, two heads are better than one; especially when both of them are well-informed. 45SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Keith Hughey Keith joined JMFA in 2012, with more than 35 years of consulting and managerial experience. Until founding his own practice, J. Keith Hughey Company in 2008, he was a principal … Web: www.JMFA.com Detailslast_img read more

Next E-waste Collection Day is Saturday at Wellington Recycling Center

first_imgSubmitted to Sumner County — E-waste collection day at the City of Wellington Recycling Center on Saturday, May 9, 2015 between 9 a.m. and 12 p.m.  Future collection dates are scheduled for June 13,  July 11 and August 8.  For more information about the operating hours please contact Jeremy Jones, Public Works Director, at 620-326-7831.For questions concerning specific items to be collected or information destruction please contact Pete at 316-305-6896 (evenings) or Julian at 316-305-6895 (evenings).Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (3) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. 0 Vote up Vote down Jim · 275 weeks ago Could you include the things that can and can not be recycled Report Reply 0 replies · active 275 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Julian · 274 weeks ago We accept everything from computers to microwaves, cell phones, small kitchen appliances, fans, stereo equipment, and much more. The only items we cannot take at all are tube televisions, tube computer monitors, and large projection televisions. However, we can recycle flat screen televisions and monitors. The tube tv’s have a large amount of lead in the glass screen which we are not able to properly recycle. We have more information on our facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ewastewellington There you will find pictures, and a more complete list of items we can recycle. Report Reply 0 replies · active 274 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Julian · 274 weeks ago We accept everything from computers to microwaves, cell phones, small kitchen appliances, fans, stereo equipment, and much more. The only items we cannot take at all are tube televisions, tube computer monitors, and large projection televisions. However, we can recycle flat screen televisions and monitors. Please visit facebook.com/ewastewellington for more information and a better list of electronics we can recycle. Report Reply 0 replies · active 274 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

Palliative care offers extra layer of support while dealing with cancer

first_imgAug 2 2018When you or a loved one is diagnosed with cancer, it is normal to be overwhelmed by thoughts of prognosis, treatments, and potential complications. Patients wonder how their lives are going to change and whether their quality of life will ever return to normal. Pain and other symptoms, sometimes from the disease and sometimes from the treatments, can have a negative impact on one’s ability to maintain a satisfactory quality of life. Dealing with the diagnosis and learning how to live with cancer requires a team effort and support from a number of professionals.Palliative care, sometimes referred to as supportive oncology services, is a specialized field of medicine focused on patients with serious illness. The goal is to help maximize quality of life through expert pain and symptom management, improved communication about goals of care and advance care planning, all while providing an extra layer of support while dealing with a serious illness. The palliative care team works closely with the oncology team to help ensure that a patient’s quality of life is a focus as they and loved ones deal with all stages of cancer.Related StoriesNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerStudy: Nearly a quarter of low-risk thyroid cancer patients receive more treatment than necessarySugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyPalliative care is appropriate at any stage of a cancer diagnosis and can be provided along with curative treatment. A palliative care team generally includes a physician or advanced practice nurse, a social worker, and a spiritual care provider. The oncology team may refer patients to meet with the palliative care team due to worsening pain, uncontrolled symptoms, or for extra support when facing serious illness.At Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, palliative care consultation is available both in the outpatient setting as well as for patients admitted to our flagship facility Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, an RWJBarnabas Health facility. We specialize in advanced pain management as well as symptoms such as uncontrolled nausea, anxiety, constipation, fatigue and poor appetite. All treatment recommendations are made after a discussion with a patient’s primary oncologist. A growing body of research shows that early consultation with the palliative care team leads to improved pain and symptom management, improved quality of life, improved advance care planning, as well as improved patient and caregiver satisfaction. Some studies have even shown improved survival when palliative care is provided early in the course of cancer care.​​Source: https://www.cinj.org/palliative-care-another-level-support-cancer-journeylast_img read more