London CIV hires four managers for £6bn worth of mandates

first_imgThe authorisation sees the London CIV recognised as an alternative investment fund manager (AIFM), in line with the European Directive by the same name.Assets are held within an Authorised Contractual Scheme, the UK’s tax-transparent fund.Grover said a large part of the £6bn expected to be in London CIV sub-funds by the end of the financial year would be passively managed equities, overseen by Legal & General Investment Management (LGIM) and BlackRock.LGIM and BlackRock will each manage three sub-funds, he said.Baillie Gifford will be in charge of a second actively managed global equity sub-fund, as well as a standalone diversified growth fund.Grover added that the London CIV now employed six people and would hire a seventh soon.The new staff includes Julian Pendock as investment oversight director, and Brian Lee as COO.Pendock joins from the London council of Brent, where he was the council fund’s investment and pensions manager, a role he assumed after five years at Senhouse Capital, latterly as its CIO.He has also worked at JP Morgan Chase and Bedlam Asset Management.Bob Kerslake, former permanent secretary at the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG), will chair the London CIV’s board.Kerslake retired from the DCLG in February this year and, until September 2014, was head of the UK’s civil service.Prior to that, he was chief executive of Sheffield City Council, and chief executive of the Homes & Communities Agency, the public body in charge of affordable housing in England.Chris Bilsland and Eric MacKay have also joined the board, appointed as non-executive directors.Until 2013, Bisland was chamberlain of the City of London, the council’s financial director.MacKay is currently head of legal, risk and compliance at asset manager TT International, and was previously F&C’s chief risk officer. The London collective investment vehicle (CIV) for the capital’s local authority funds has named its first four managers, to be in charge of £6bn (€8.5bn) in equity mandates.Allianz Global Investors will be in charge of the first sub-fund to be launched by the London CIV.The active global equity fund has attracted more than £500m from three of the participating local government pension schemes, chief executive Hugh Grover said.Grover added that a further eight sub-funds were expected to be launched by the end of the financial year, possible after the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) authorised the vehicle.last_img read more

Block party: McDaniels leads ACC in blocks, presents defensive obstacle for Syracuse on Sunday

first_img Published on February 7, 2014 at 12:41 am Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3 Facebook Twitter Google+ Montay Brandon thought he had an easy two points. With Florida State trailing Clemson by seven with just under 90 seconds to play, he intercepted a pass from a trapped K.J. McDaniels and had an open lane to the basket.It would have cut the lead to five and given the Seminoles the momentum.But McDaniels had other ideas.He raced over from the sideline where he’d thrown his errant pass, extended his entire body and grabbed Brandon’s shot out of the air with both hands.“He swallowed it,” the television announcer bellowed.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textClemson held on for the 53-49 win.“It felt like it kind of took the wind out of the place,” McDaniels said. “It took the fans’ energy from them after that. They were cheering loud when they stole the ball, but as soon as that happened they were quiet.”It was the first time the junior had completed such a block while at Clemson. But swatting shots is nothing new for the 6-foot-6 combo forward.In his first two seasons with the Tigers, he rejected 78 shots, ranking No. 1 in school history for a player his height or shorter. This season he’s averaging 2.62 per game — tops in the Atlantic Coast Conference — and out of the top 50 shot blockers in the nation, he’s committed the fewest amount of fouls.He’ll get a chance to show off his defensive ability when Clemson travels to play No. 1 Syracuse at the Carrier Dome on Sunday at 6 p.m.“It’s a natural feeling for me,” McDaniels said. “I’ve always been the athletic-type guy. I’ve always been that way and I’ve always had that ability to jump.“It’s just putting it all together. Just doing all the things and being more versatile.”McDaniels said he modeled his game after Dwayne Wade’s, because, despite his size, he’s always going up at the backboard and surprising defenders with his ability. Like Wade, McDaniels has fantastic instincts. He often starts racing to the basket to block a shot before the player on offense even starts his shooting motion.“That’s a natural gift from God,” said Tigers assistant coach Earl Grant, who recruited him to play at Clemson. “A lot of the stuff that K.J. has, it’s natural. You can’t teach it. It’s in his genes.”What Grant saw when he first saw McDaniels play at Central Park Christian (Ala.) School was an oversized power forward. He didn’t have as many refined skills, but his instincts for blocking shots and playing defense were well ahead of the curve.Every day before practice, Central Park Christian head coach Donovan Broadnax would run a tip drill. Players would jump then throw the ball off the backboard then jump up and do it again. Ten times with each hand, then 10 more with both hands. They couldn’t stop and couldn’t bobble the ball.At the end of the year, Broadnax would make it a competition to see who could last the longest. McDaniels would sometimes do it more than 100 times without messing up, well ahead of his teammates.“He has natural ball instincts,” Broadnax said. “If you don’t screen him out he’s going to put it back. And he’s going to put it back on your head, if you don’t put a body on him. I think that helps with his shot blocking.”Broadnax said it’s cool to turn on the television and see McDaniels on SportsCenter, but also said he fears that McDaniels’ success and elevating stock might affect his personality.“Once you start getting on ESPN Top 10 pretty regularly, it’s hard to stay humble,” Broadnax said. “You’re in the same Top 10 as like LeBron (James) and Blake Griffin. That’s big time, especially coming from Birmingham, Ala.”But McDaniels has stayed modest.His mother called Broadnax earlier this week to talk about how proud she is of the person McDaniels has become — even though there is more attention and more cameras on him than ever before.Before, he couldn’t create his own shots. Now he can dribble and shoot, which makes him much more dangerous.“We’d always say, ‘If you ever jump with this shot, the way you jump, you could be looking down at the rim shooting it in,’” Broadnax said.With the Orange struggling to score when the other team prevents it from driving to the basket, McDaniels figures to be a key factor in Clemson’s game plan. With him clogging the middle, SU may struggle to score, which could position Clemson to knock off the undefeated Orange.He doesn’t really have an explanation for why he’s become so versatile a player. Some of it is hard work. Some of it is just natural ability.Whatever the cause, the result is a spectacle and the Orange will see it firsthand on Sunday evening.Said McDaniels: “I have heart. Just being physical. It’s just a physics-type thing.” Commentslast_img read more

Take a Look at the Promotional Video for the Match B&H – Ireland (Video)

first_imgTonight at 8:45 p.m. in Zenica, our Dragons are playing the first match of the play-off for the Euro against the national team of Ireland.On this occasion, the Football Federation of B&H (NSB&H) prepared a promotional video in which we can see some of the past success and celebrations of our Dragons.Dzeko, Pjanic, Begovic and others tonight will try to win before the rematch in Dublin, and until the beginning of tonight’s match let’s remind ourselves to some of the goals of the Dragons from the previous period.Enjoy!(Source: klix.ba)last_img