Entergy: No intent to mislead found, but some communication incomplete or inaccurate

first_imgEntergy Corporation today announced it has provided to Vermont Attorney General William Sorrell the results of its independent internal investigation into alleged contradictory or misleading information provided to the state government by company officials about underground piping at the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant.The report, prepared by the law firm of Morgan Lewis and Bockius LLP, did not find that any Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee employees intentionally misled the Vermont Public Service Board, the Department of Public Service, a Public Oversight Panel assessing the plant’s reliability as part of its application for renewal of its operating license, or a contracting firm working for the panel, Nuclear Safety Associates.The report noted that the communications in question were made by Entergy employees in the context of the scope defined by the state’s contractor, Nuclear Safety Associates, in performing the reliability assessment. The Entergy responses were limited to only pipes that touch soil (not those encased in concrete), that carry liquid (not gaseous matter) and that are part of whole systems as defined by law.  However, the Entergy employees’ failure to specify the context of their communication led to misunderstandings and, taken out of that context, the responses were incomplete and misleading, the report maintained.As a result of that failure, Entergy has removed five senior Vermont Yankee employees from their positions at Vermont Yankee and placed them on administrative leave. They are the vice president for operations, director of nuclear safety assurance, manager of licensing, technical specialist and senior project manager.The company also reprimanded an additional six managerial employees.  All the discipline taken had financial consequences for the employees involved.  Michael Colomb, Entergy Vermont Yankee site vice president, was reprimanded for failure to maintain an organization that adhered to the highest standards of conduct in all actions and communications.In a statement, Colomb said he was disappointed in how the contradictory or misleading information was given to the state and he, as the lead Entergy official at Vermont Yankee, took responsibility for what happened.”While there was no intentional wrongdoing, it is not consistent with our expectations at Vermont Yankee or in the nuclear industry, nor is it consistent with our values at Entergy,” Colomb said.Entergy Corporation’s online address is www.entergy.com(link is external)SOURCE Entergy Corporation. MONTPELIER, Vt., Feb. 24 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ —last_img read more

Dodgers end pursuit of Hisashi Iwakuma, who signs with Mariners

first_imgNow the Dodgers are in the position of having to pick up the spare.For all the progress they made with Greinke and Iwakuma — and Jeff Samardzija, who reportedly received a formal offer from the Dodgers before signing with the Giants — the Dodgers haven’t added to their starting rotation since Brett Anderson accepted his qualifying offer on Nov. 13.That will certainly change by the time pitchers and catchers report to spring training in February. Behind ace left-hander Clayton Kershaw, the rotation is full of question marks. Can Anderson avoid the disabled list for two straight seasons for the first time in his career? Can Hyun-Jin Ryu return after missing all of 2015? When will Brandon McCarthy be able to return from Tommy John surgery? Where do Alex Wood and Mike Bolsinger fit in?That’s an unenviable list of questions for any team. It doesn’t help that the Dodgers’ division rivals have already loaded up on starting pitching. The Giants doubled down by signing Johnny Cueto to a six-year contract after locking up Samardzija for five years. The Diamondbacks have Greinke. Seattle Mariners general manager Jerry Dipoto announced Thursday night — at a company party, no less — that Hisashi Iwakuma will re-sign with the only major league team he’s ever pitched for.Earlier this month the Dodgers and Iwakuma agreed to terms on a three-year, $45 million contract that was pending a physical. Something changed after the Dodgers reviewed the physical, however, and the Mariners apparently wasted little time swooping in. Iwakuma’s contract is guaranteed for one year, with vesting options for 2017 and 2018 — far more conservative terms for a pitcher with a history of arm troubles. Speaking last week at the Winter Meetings, days after Zack Greinke signed with the Arizona Diamondbacks, Dipoto said the Dodgers “just came in and threw a bowling ball into the alley” with their three-year offer. The Dodgers may be short on pitching, but they still have time. According to multiple reports Thursday, they have already engaged the Tampa Bay Rays in talks for right-handed pitcher Jake Odorizzi.Odorizzi, 25, comes with less injury risk than the 34-year-old Iwakuma, though he did miss time last season with a strained left oblique. Since joining the Rays’ rotation in 2014, Odorizzi has gone 20-22 with a 3.74 earned-run average.Odorizzi isn’t eligible for arbitration until 2017, so he’d cost less money than Iwakuma. The price in terms of prospects is unknown.The Dodgers bolstered their probable Triple-A rotation Wednesday by acquiring Frankie Montas from the Chicago White Sox — another possible trade chip in their arsenal.Right-hander Mike Leake, left-hander Scott Kazmir and right-hander Kenta Maeda headline the remaining free agent starters. Unlike Iwakuma, the Dodgers would not have to surrender a first-round draft pick to sign Leake, Kazmir or Maeda. Maeda, 27, was posted by his Japanese team last week. The teams who have paid the expected $20 million posting fee to negotiate with him are expected to be revealed soon.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more