WI ‘A’ suffer massive defeat

first_imgDAMBULLA, Sri Lanka (CMC): A dramatic batting collapse ensured a series defeat for West Indies ‘A’ as they plunged to a 138-run loss on the last day of the third and final four-day “Test” against Sri Lanka ‘A’ here yesterday. Set a target of 333 for victory, the Caribbean side were cruising at 108 for two before losing their last eight wickets for just 86 runs to crumble for 194 all out at the Rangiri Dambulla International Stadium. Captain Shamarh Brooks top-scored with 46, Kieran Powell got 44, while his opening partner, Rajendra Chandrika, stroked 30. However, it was leg-spinner Jeffrey Vandersay who had the final say, claiming six for 47 to wreck the innings. Sri Lanka A had earlier declared their second innings on 257 for six, after resuming from their overnight 211 for five. Roshen Silva, unbeaten at the start on 29, made 44 off 97 balls, while Dasun Shanaka converted his overnight seven into 33 not out off 76 deliveries with five fours. They stretched their sixth-wicket stand to 65 before being separated when fast bowler Keon Joseph prised out Silva to finish with two for 30. Off-spinner Rahkeem Cornwall claimed four for 87. Powell and Chandrika then gave the visitors a bright start by posting 63 for the first wicket. The left-handed Powell faced just 41 balls and struck seven fours and a six in a cameo knock, while Chandrika was more patient, consuming 93 deliveries and counting a single four. When Powell was lbw to left-arm spinner Lakshan Sandakan, Shimron Hetmyer helped add another 25 for the second wicket with Chandrika. He had made a breezy 18 off 16 balls, with four fours, when he perished at 88 for two, and his dismissal triggered a slide, where three wickets fell for 36 runs as Chandrika and left-hander Vishaul Singh (6) also fell in quick succession. Stumbling on 124 for four, West Indies ‘A’ were pulled around by a 47-run, fifth-wicket partnership between Brooks and wicketkeeper Jahmar Hamilton, who made 25. The right-handed Brooks faced 75 deliveries and struck five fours, while Hamilton spent 61 balls at the crease and hit a single boundary. The decline started when Brooks and Rahkeem Cornwall (0) fell off successive deliveries to Vandersay to leave Windies ‘A’ on 171 for six, and the end came swiftly as the last four wickets tumbled for 10 runs. West Indies ‘A’ will turn their attention to the three-match one-day series, which bowls off on Monday.last_img read more

What we learned from Raiders DC Paul Guenther at Senior Bowl

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceMOBILE, Ala. — Paul Guenther is three weeks removed from a season in which he oversaw the NFL’s worst defense, and he hopes to turn the page with three first-round picks and hands-on experience with potential future Raiders at the Senior Bowl this week.Guenther, entering his second season as the Raiders’ defensive coordinator, spoke with local reporters on Wednesday evening in Mobile.Here are a couple notable topics …last_img

Backpacking in South Africa

first_imgIf you want an inexpensive way to travel through South Africa, find your guide to backpacking through the country, here:Backpacking through South Africa is an option if you want to save money as a traveller. (Image: South African Tourism, Flickr)Brand South Africa reporterIf you’ve got more time than money, there’s no better way to see South Africa than to backpack your way around its many offerings: spectacular beauty, a mosaic of cultures, incredible value for money, massive adventure potential – and an undeniable penchant for partying!Interested? Then take a few minutes to run through our quick guide …Get a kikoiFirst off, go out and buy a couple of kikois. Whether you’re a boy or a girl, macho or not, this sarong-like piece of clothing will be your life-saver when the sun’s blasting down, when the travel gear is rolling around in the washer, when you’ve got some downtime and you don’t need to dress up.The kikoi, which comes from Kenya, has been adopted by African overlanders and backpackers as the preferred chill-outfit from Cape Town to Cairo.Backpacking accommodationEastern CapeGautengKwaZulu-NatalWestern CapeRest of South AfricaDo your homeworkNext, go out and buy a travel book on South Africa. If you’re a surfer, you don’t want to find out about the perfect point-break B&B at the end of your trip. If you’re a birder, you’d like to know where to find the elusive blue swallow long before you hit these shores. And if you like to drink a lager at sunset with the best bathing in the southern hemisphere at your feet, it’s nice to know about Lookout Beach in advance, right?You’ll want something like the Insight Guide to South Africa or The Rough Guide to South Africa to get you started. And when you pass the Africa shelf at your local bookstore, you might want to flip through the array of coffee table publications on the country. Then check out South African Tourism’s website, www.southafrica.net.Once you’re in South Africa, all the major centres have well-run provincial tourist offices. Nose around there, and you’ll find the set of pamphlets you need to tailor-make your trip.TransportIf you’ve got a fantasy about riding around SA on the end of your thumb, lose it. This is not hitch-hiker country. South Africa is the kind of place where, if you know what to do and where to go, you’ll never experience a finer trip. But it’s not advisable to enter into the unknown anywhere in the world these days, and South Africa is no exception.So when you’re in the cities, like Johannesburg, Cape Town or Durban, use the public transport system, get a cab or hire a car. If you’re staying for a spell, you could do worse than buy a car – and sell it at journey’s end.Each city has a vibrant tourism centre which can advise you on day tours, bus routes to and from your hostel, and discounts where available.The bus services between cities are excellent, and so are the roads. And the backpackers’ delight, Baz Bus, is a convenient, value-for-money, hop-on hop-off door-to-door bus service to just about every backpacker’s lodge in southern Africa.If it’s in your budget, then the classic road trip through South Africa (hire or buy a car, share the cost with travelling friends) will offer up more delights than anything Route 66 ever dreamt of.Your foreign licence (as long as it’s printed in English) is valid for six months. If yours is in another language, then get an International Driving Permit before you depart for South Africa.Where to stayThe good news is, there are backpackers’ lodges galore in South Africa – see our backpackers’ accommodation box above – and you can book ahead by contacting Backpacking South Africa. The other good news is that backpacker bed rates are astoundingly cheap in this country.And once you’re staying at a backpacker’s, you can plug in to the local travelling network and find out all kinds of great things, like where to eat for next to nothing, or party until dawn, or find a long-lost friend. You’re in a well-run overlanding subculture here, so enjoy it.Your choice of where to stay depends on what you want out of the trip. South Africa is, to pound a cliche, a great smorgasbord of tourism opportunities for you to feast on!The peopleWithin hours of your arrival, you’re going to discover that South Africa is a great, heaving melting pot of cultures, colours, languages and traditions. And South Africans are very proud of our diversity.Your pocketbook guides will tell you about us, and how to behave around us. But, like most places, if you’re friendly and polite with the people you meet, chances are you’ll be met with twice the warmth.So prepare to spend time with a Zulu warrior around the fire at night, wake up at dawn and go on a game drive with a ranger who speaks Afrikaans, be served some exotic local dish by a beautiful Malay girl, share a bus with a bunch of transplanted Scots, and learn to say things like “Howzit?” (How is it/ are you?), “Hey, my bra, that’s lekka!” (Hey, my brother, that’s wonderful!), and “Sharp!” (cool!).SA slang is lekker, bru!TownshipsDemocracy arrived in South Africa in 1994 only, so the teeming townships of South Africa are, like the favelas of Brazil, poverty-ridden places where sensitivities are high.But there’s nothing to beat a township shebeen (tavern) pumping after midnight, full of laughter and jazz, or a township marketplace on a Saturday morning. There’s a sense of vibrancy in SA’s townships that cannot be met in the traditionally quieter urban suburbs. This is where you meet the soul of South Africa.But take a guide, go with an accredited tour, don’t just blunder off into a strange settlement. And with the right introductions, and a few simple safeguards, you’ll have the time of your life.Outdoor adventuresCulture’s fine, you say. But where’s the rush? Welcome to Adrenalin Central.South Africa is where you can toss yourself over the highest bungee jump in the world, where you can hit the white waters of our river systems in rubber ducks (inflatable boats), where you climb the peaks of our mighty Drakensberg mountains, where you can microlight through the hills of Mpumalanga, and where you can dive -in a cage, thankfully – in the middle of Great White Shark territory.There’s also another level of outdoor activities that includes horseback trail-riding, cattle mustering, hiking for days through mind-blowing landscapes, quietly fishing for the noble trout in our Highlands, or tracking the rare black rhino for hours in the safe hands of a trained guide.South Africa was built for the outdoors spirit, and we celebrate this in a hundred different ways.Food and drinkPrepare yourself for World Grub, a global gastronomic trip that could begin with chicken sosaties (kebabs) and end with mopani worms fried over an open fire. We have Chinese, we have Italian, we have American, we have good old British stodge – but we also have Cape Malay, KwaZulu-Natal Indian, boerekos (farm fare), and the finest lamb chops from the vast Karoo scrublands.The South African service industry is on a fast track, and you’ll have no problems eating out or self-catering.When it comes to beer and wine, you’ll find either of both of these to be plentiful, excellent and very cheap. South African beer, because of the hot weather, is a special favourite. And a tour of the Cape winelands will have you sending cases of Cabernet home.The nightlifeOur cities all have their clublands, catering to the various youth tribes in the country. Raves, folk clubs and jazz clubs are everywhere. And listen out for kwaito, our home-grown, township R&B rap style.Cafe society has finally caught on in South Africa. For decades, no one did anything but walk on the sidewalks, and now you literally can’t move for all the coffee bars and late night restaurants that have sprung up.Again, Durban, Johannesburg and Cape Town are night-life favourites, but prepare for after-hours surprises in places like East London, Port Elizabeth and Bloemfontein.The mediaThe big cities have all got their set of daily newspapers, and there’s a lively magazine industry that supports tourism. Travel tips, lifestyle information and facts you can use can be found in all our bookshops and news agents. If you want to catch up on national news from home, most leading newsgents also carry offshore publications.Internet cafes have blossomed all over South Africa, and you’ll find them not only in the large centres but also in many of the small rural towns you’ll be passing through. Take time off to keep in touch with the family. Encourage them to come over and join you!SafetyThe same rules apply as for anywhere else in the world. Be careful. Don’t wander off alone down dark alleys at night.Try not to display all your electronic possessions.Pack cash, credit cards and traveller’s cheques in separate places. Let your lodge or hotel know where you are. Leave your expensive jewellery at home.Keep a look out for muggers, and store your wallet where it can’t be pickpocketed. Take care around automatic cash machines.These and many other safety rules are what you should be following back home and while travelling anywhere abroad. Crime is not endemic to South Africa.PhotographyDust is the enemy – always remember that if you’re carrying cameras in South Africa. One of the reasons our sunsets are so spectacular is because of mid-air dust, which also tends to foul up camera equipment if care is not taken.In the winter, you’ll find your soft light from about 3pm to 5pm, and in the summer it all starts and ends a little later. But, if you can make it, the African dawns are equally superb for photography. Try to time your photo-excursions for the “book-ends of the day”, leaving the harsh light of the lunch-hour for the poolside siesta.If you’re packing more than a little pocket camera, then consider dropping in a 300mm zoom lens for the long shots, especially when you’re out in the wilderness and you can’t get closer to those lions. For normal street-work and portraits, a smaller 28-80mm zoom lens is best.Last-minute check listHealth/travel insurance?Malaria pills for the summer months (November through March) for certain parts of the country?Relevant contact numbers?Luggage locks?Sunglasses and hats?An unbridled sense of fun and adventure?Check out some useful facts for tourists – and have a blast!This article was first published on South African Tourism. Republished on Brand South Africa with permission of the author.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

6 First-Hand Tips On How Startups Can Cope With Success

first_imgStartups are fast-paced, sometimes hectic places to work. In the early days, everyone wears multiple hats and is expected to lend a hand where needed, leading to close bonds between team members.But when a startup stars to become successful – and outgrows its all-hands-on-deck philosophy – the founder’s job is to make sure that the company can properly scale to cope with the new reality. It’s a good problem to have, of course, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy.So we asked six successful founders from the Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) to share some of their growing pains and errors – and their advice for others in the same (lucky) boat. 1. Implement A Consistent Recruiting CultureA big mistake is not implementing a culture adept at consistently recruiting talent for all jobs. One summer, we had to hire 20 teachers within two months. Our HR manager felt pressured to hire fast and didn’t follow our interview process (blame me). We ended up hiring good teachers – but not excellent teachers. The excuses from the HR manager were pressure, time and the rigid interviewing process. The truth is that we hadn’t built a database since our founding, and we wasted time looking for new people when we could have followed up with previously approved, highly qualified candidates. – Derek Capo, Next Step China 2. Let Top-Level Players Focus On Their StrengthsMy CFOs and other finance professionals are financial experts and great at what they do. They also have strong client-service skills, but they are not salespeople. Business development is not their forte. When our company started expanding, I attempted to push my top-level players into that biz dev direction. I quickly realized that a growing company will be stronger if you manage your expectations about the strengths and abilities of your top-level team and don’t distract them with responsibilities better handled by someone else. Now, I let my executive team work to their strengths and look for other scalable ways to develop my business. – David Ehrenberg, Early Growth Financial Services 3. Establish A Cohesive Company EnvironmentCompany culture sets the tone for work ethic, creativity and productivity at a company. When our team was 10 people strong, we regularly took company breaks and played soccer tennis at the park. Whenever we took breaks, we did it as a unit – ensuring that no one felt like they were working harder than anyone else. However, when we grew to 20 people, the company departments started branching off and taking breaks on their own and leaving the office at separate times. It eventually turned into a culture where different departments felt like the other departments weren’t pulling their weight. The company needs to define the work culture from the beginning and encourage team members to build a fun and productive environment. – Jun Loayza, Reputation Hacks 4. Encourage OwnershipAs the beauty salon industry is projected to grow, our clientele and our staff grows. Our company culture has to be clearly defined by our top-level players. During our mini-meetings and mid-year or annual reviews, I always ask, “What do you think (about our training, our team, the support you are receiving, etc.)?” We recently had to increase our work hours to accommodate our clients. Instead of making the executive decision to change everyone’s schedule, our top players gave me input on where to add hours. The biggest mistake I made was in hiring new employees without the input of top-level employees. We ended up with employees who refused to be respectful to teammates. Now, I have each employee meet candidates while I interview them to get to know them and ask questions. – Nancy T. Nguyen, Sweet T Salon 5. Offer Opportunities To LeadInterns test leadership potential and team dynamics. We’re gradually building staff, but the seasonal ebb and flow of interns give the staff an opportunity to lead a variety of personalities. Right now, we have 10 interns, but we’ve had as many as 20 people from every walk of life crammed into every corner of our office, challenging themselves and us in new ways while learning business skills. At this point, my team and I have worked with what feels like every type of individual out there. So even when it came to a direct hire for our Head of Marketing position, we knew that our top contender’s enthusiasm, love of ping pong and positive “team spirit” attitude was a great fit. In turn, he’s been an encouraging and collaborative leader. – Manpreet Singh, Seva Call 6. Create A Culture of LearningMy philosophy is that no matter how good we are at something, we could always be doing something better. Building a company is going to be messy, and mistakes are going to be made. In fact, if mistakes are not being made, I might argue that you’re not pushing yourself hard enough. The goal is to make the mistakes in non-critical situations so those mistakes will be avoided in a critical situation. I’m very transparent with our top-level team about where I’ve fallen short and what I’m doing to improve my skills as a CEO. This has helped to create a culture where we’re all learning together, and admitting you made a mistake is okay. – Anderson Schoenrock, ScanDigital AI Will Empower Leaders, Not Replace Them How to Meet the Demands of the Socially Conscio… scott gerber How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi… How to Cultivate the Skill of Being a Creative … Related Posts last_img read more

Shivraj Singh faces protestsin Odisha

first_imgMassive protests by farmers and political activists groups greeted Madhya Pradesh Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan as he reached the western Odisha town of Bargarh to address a ‘Sabka Sath Sabka Vikas’ meeting on Saturday.Members of the Biju Janata Dal, Aam Aadmi Party and Paschim Odisha Krushak Sangathan Samanaya Samiti staged protests at different places and chanted ‘Shivraj Singh, go back’ and ‘Shivraj Singh, killer of farmers’. They were livid over the death of six farmers in M.P.’s Mandsaur.The Bargarh district police carried out preventive arrests by taking 183 persons into custody.Mr. Singh, however, dismissed the allegations.last_img

Hizb was backed by JeI: Centre

first_imgA day after it banned the Jammu and Kashmir-based group Jamaat-e-Islami (JeI) under the anti-terror law, the Centre said the organisation was responsible for the formation of Hizbul Mujahideen (HM), the largest terrorist organisation active in the State. A senior Home Ministry official said the JeI had been providing all kinds of support to the HM in terms of recruits, funding, shelter, and logistics. “In a way, the HM is a militant wing of JeI (J&K),” the official said.The organisation was banned twice in the past — in 1975 for two years by the J&K government and in April 1990 by the MHA which continued till December, 1993. “JeI is the main organisation responsible for propagation of separatist and radical ideology in the Kashmir Valley,” said the official. “Jel has been pursuing the agenda of setting up an independent theocratic Islamic state by destabilising the government,” said the official.According to him, a sizeable section of JeI cadres overtly worked for militant organisations, especially HM. “Its cadres are actively involved in the subversive activities of HM by providing hideouts, and ferrying arms.” “The strong presence of HM in the area of influence of JeI is a clear reflection of separatist and radical ideology of the organisation,” the official said.last_img read more