Coaching carousel connects Ohio State Michigan State

Left: Michigan State coach Mark Dantonio appears on the sidelines during a game against OSU on Sept. 29, 2012 in East Lansing, Mich. OSU won, 17-16. Credit: TNS Right: OSU co-defensive coordinator and linebackers coach Luke Fickell talks to players on the sideline during a game against Penn State on Oct. 25 in State College, Pa. OSU won in double-overtime, 31-24. Credit: Ritika Shah / Lantern TV News directorWhen Ohio State football fans, players and coaches look across the field Saturday night, there will be more than one familiar face staring back at them.With four straight years of matchups, there was bound to be some familiarity between the two teams as the co-leaders of the Big Ten East Division are scheduled to square off again.Michigan State coach Mark Dantonio spent three seasons in Columbus as the Buckeyes’ defense coordinator (2001-03), helping OSU win a national championship in 2002, before taking his first head coaching job less than two hours from OSU at Cincinnati.During his time with the Bearcats, Dantonio coached with current OSU tight ends and fullbacks coach Tim Hinton.When Dantonio accepted the head coaching job at Michigan State in 2007, Hinton said he was on his way to join him, but changed his mind on the way to East Lansing, Mich.“In reality, I was in a car with suitcases in a car driving towards an airport, and I called Mark and I said ‘I can’t go, I’m going to stay at Cincinnati,’” Hinton said Monday. “I was supposed to have gone with him.”Hinton stayed at Cincinnati for two more seasons before following Brian Kelly to Notre Dame for another two years.Now in his third year at OSU, Hinton said he expects Dantonio to use anything he can to motivate the Spartans for Saturday’s matchup.“I do know Mark very well. The thing that’s really interesting about Mark and that group, they are they have a unique way of saying, ‘OK, I’m going to put the chip on my shoulder somewhat,’” Hinton said. “There’s going to be something that comes out of this press conference, I’m going to guarantee you they’re going to put on a bulletin board somehow, some way, the world’s against them.”Dantonio acknowledged his relationship with Hinton during his weekly press conference Tuesday and said he believes a motivated team is key to winning a big game.“Sometimes I do think you have to play with an edge,” Dantonio said. “I think this is a physical type — I’m talking football in general is a very physical game and it’s a very emotional game and you have to have your tank full, emotionally full to be able to play through the ups and downs of a football game.”Dantonio isn’t the only former Buckeye assistant wearing green and white nowadays as longtime OSU offensive coordinator and offensive line coach Jim Bollman (2001-11) is in his second season as the Spartans co-offensive coordinator and tight ends coach.Current OSU co-defensive coordinator and linebackers coach Luke Fickell, who has been a Buckeye assistant since 2002, said Monday that he considers his peers in East Lansing more of acquaintances than friends.“Friends would probably be someone you talk to on a weekly basis or maybe monthly basis. If that’s the case, I don’t think I have a whole lot of friends,” Fickell said. “The reality is there is a lot of people over there (Michigan State) that I have known, I have worked with and have some long-standing relationships with.”From a game plan standpoint, OSU coach Urban Meyer said he doesn’t expect a big change from the Spartan staff.“The one thing about their coach and coaching staff, they’re pretty set in what they do. They’re really good at it,” Meyer said Monday. “But they’ll have a little wrinkle here and there that we have to be ready for. That’s why we’re watching what we did against them last year. And how do you prepare for it? We anticipate and you give them that rep in practice. That’s the only way to do it.”Friends or not, the Buckeyes and Spartans are scheduled to kick off from Spartan Stadium at 8 p.m. Saturday. read more

GOP Ponders Length of FY17 Continuing Resolution

first_imgRepublican leaders to date have not made any decision as to how long a fiscal 2017 continuing resolution (CR) would extend, but House conservatives are making clear their preference for a stopgap spending measure that lasts until March 2017.A CR almost certainly will be needed for most, if not all, spending bills to avoid a government shutdown when the new fiscal year begins in October, as the regular appropriations process appears to be coming to an end. Conservatives are pushing for a CR that lasts about six months to avoid the last-minute negotiations on an omnibus spending measure that typically take place behind closed doors as the December holidays approach.“The last thing we want to see is some kind of a shutdown scenario in December, and then basically giving the president everything that he asks for,” Rep. Matt Salmon (R-Ariz.) told CQ.Other Republicans, especially appropriators, favor a shorter stopgap, including Harold Rogers (R-Ky.), chairman of the House Appropriations Committee.“I would, yeah,” Rogers told reporters. But he added, “It’s just beginning to be talked about.”Discussion of a six-month stopgap has largely taken place only in the House, with at least one Senate appropriator leaning toward finishing work on FY 2017 appropriations before the end of the congressional session.“The problem with pushing these things out too far [is] you’ve got the old year to consider and you’ve got the new year to consider, and you really get into a time crunch,” Sen. John Boozman (R-Ark.) told CQ.Democrats similarly favor finishing the process in 2016. Placing spending on autopilot for the first half of the fiscal year cheats agencies out of the opportunity to start new programs, said Sen. Richard Durbin (D-Ill.), the chamber’s Democratic whip and a senior appropriator.“Try to run the Department of Defense on a CR. You know the bottom line or top dollar number, but to put into each one of your agencies, sub-agencies, the same amount of money as last year, is not a good way to govern and it’s certainly not a good way to respect the taxpayers’ dollars,” Durbin said. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

India for enacting law against lynching if needed

first_imgRajnath SinghReiterating that 1984 Sikh riots was the biggest incident of lynching, Indian union home minister Rajnath Singh on Tuesday said the central government is taking the incidents of lynching “very seriously” and might bring a law, if necessary, to stop it.”I want to make it clear that the government is not just concerned but has taken lynching incidents very seriously,” Rajnath Singh told the Lok Sabha after opposition members raised the issue days after a cattle farmer was killed allegedly by cow vigilantes in Rajasthan’s Alwar.Rajnath Singh said the biggest incident of lynching had occurred in 1984 when thousands of Sikhs were killed in the aftermath of the assassination of then prime minister Indira Gandhi.”But, the incidents of lynching should not be politicised. The Supreme Court has also given its observations on lynchings,” he said.The home minister said the government on Monday set up a high-level committee and a Group of Ministers (GoM) headed by him to check mob lynchings and suggest measures to stop mob violence in the country.He said the Home Secretary-led committee would give its recommendations to the Group of Ministers within four weeks.”After deliberations, we will take a decision as to what needs to be done to take strong action against the incidents of lynchings. We will also bring a law if that is required,” he said, adding that such incidents have been happening for the past many years.In the officials committee to be headed by home secretary R K Gauba, the Secretaries of the Departments of Justice, Legal Affairs, Legislative and Social Justice and Empowerment will also be members.External affairs minister Sushma Swaraj, Road Transport and Highways minister Nitin Gadkari, Law and Justice minister Ravi Shankar Prasad and social justice and empowerment minister Thaawar Chand Gehlot are members of the GoM.The GoM will submit their recommendations to the prime minister.During the discussion, Leader of Congress in Lok Sabha Mallikarjun Kharge demanded that the government should appoint a sitting Supreme Court judge to probe the incidents of lynchings.Referring to the Alwar lynching case, Kharge said: “There was a direct involvement of police in the death of the victim (Rakbar Khan). The Gau Rakhshaks who lynched the victim were followers of the local MLA (Ramgarh MLA Gyan Dev Ahuja).”Lok Sabha speaker Sumitra Mahajan interrupted and said no allegations should be levelled as the investigation was on.”Since the state (Rajasthan) government is not responding, we demand that the Centre should also appoint a sitting Supreme Court judge to probe the incidents of lynchings apart from the high-level committees,” he added.Lok Sabha deputy speaker M Thambi Durai said even though law and order is a state subject, the states need the support of the Centre to modernise the police staff in order to tackle such incidents.CPI(M) MP Mohammed Salim said a trend of mob justice on the streets is increasing based on rumours, cow protection or child-lifting.”Such an environment has been created in the country for the past 10-12 years and the situation is worsening. We need to accept the fact. Such incidents of hatred are spreading across the country and it is very dangerous. It is not just a Hindu-Muslim issue or a matter of cow protection, even Swami Agnivesh was attacked.”If we garland the convicts in mob lynching case and protect them… such incidents are also happening in West Bengal and Tripura, which had never occurred earlier,” said Salim.last_img read more

Farmland preservation bills reviewed in committee

first_imgPA 116 has been a popular and successful program since 1974, created for the preservation of farmland“I have recently heard from constituents that they are experiencing long delays in receiving their PA 116 tax credit,” said Rep. Glardon, R-Owosso. “These bills are intended to ensure a timelier processing of the Farmland and Open Space Preservation tax credit payments.”The bills allow PA 116 to get funding from the Agricultural Preservation Fund, along with the General Fund, which it is currently funded by.It is estimated that up to $1.2 million could be dedicated annually to the Agricultural Preservation Fund from unclaimed farmland tax credits. This revenue would be dedicated to administering the program to process renewals, transfers and new applications.HB 5189 and HB 5191 are sponsored by Rep. Dan Lauwers, and HB 5190 is sponsored by Rep. Brett Roberts.For more information, contact Rep. Glardon’s office by phone at (517) 373-0841 or by email to BenGlardon@house.mi.gov. 28Jan Farmland preservation bills reviewed in committee Photo cutline: Rep. Ben Glardon, right, stands with Rich Harlow, program manager of the Farmland and Open Space Preservation Program, left.On Jan. 27, the House Committee on Agriculture heard testimony on House Bills 5189, 5190 and 5191. Co-sponsored by Rep. Ben Glardon, these bills will make needed changes to the Farmland and Open Space Preservation Program, commonly known as Public Act 116. Tags: Farmland and Open Space, PA 116, Rep. Glardon center_img ##### Categories: Featured news,Glardon Photos,News,Photoslast_img read more

Public broadcaster France Télévisions will next we

first_imgPublic broadcaster France Télévisions will next week begin the process of negotiating its objectives and finances with the French government.The broadcaster has already been forced to produce a plan to make overall cuts of €100 million, having already economised to the tune of €40 million this year.Government direct funding for the broadcaster next year is to be cut by €86 million, which could be ameliorated to some extent by a possible increase in the French equivalent of licence fee contributions from households of €2. The broadcaster is expected to turn in a loss of €25 million this year after advertising revenues fell short of expectations.The government for its part wants France Télévisions to maintain its current level of support for content creation and for local and regional services.France Télévisions president Rémy Pflimlin is to meet prime minister Jean-Marc Ayrault on November 30 to discuss the broadcaster’s options.last_img read more

The French media regulator the CSA has relaxed a

first_imgThe French media regulator, the CSA, has relaxed advertising restrictions placed on leading commercial broadcaster TF1 during its main one-hour news broadcasts, but has declined a request to reduce the amount of news content the broadcast is required to carry.Renewing the broadcast licences of both TF1 and M6, the country’s other main commercial player, the CSA has allowed TF1 to introduce ad breaks during news broadcasts longer than 30 minutes, covering the Journal de 20h primetime news show.Advert breaks will be restricted to 12 minutes for the hour, as is the case for other parts of the schedule.In addition to rejecting a request to reduce its news broadcasts, the CSA refused to allow TF1 to reduce its output for kids and denied it permission to introduce cross-promotion between its main channel and dedicated news channel LCI.TF1 has until now been banned from providing ad breaks during its main news shows because of its dominant position in the TV ad  market.The broadcaster has not so far indicated that it plans to introduce new ad breaks during the shows. The CSA has estimated that green-lighting ad breaks during the broadcasts could deliver an additional €10-40 million in ad revenue a year to TF1. However, the broadcaster’s rivals fear that any such move could have a detrimental impact on the finances of digital-terrestrial channels.Public broadcaster France Télévisions’ director-general, Delphine Ernotte, told French parliamentarians yesterday that she was not opposed to the introduction of new ad breaks on TF1.Ernotte, who has raised the possibility of teaming up with commercial players at some point in the future to launch a common platform for French content aimed at the international market, said a healthy commercial broadcast sector was desirable.last_img read more

Since I was thinking about bond yields I called D

first_img Since I was thinking about bond yields, I called Dr. Lacy Hunt (one of the more brilliant economists in the country, and not just in my opinion). He has been forecasting interest rates for a long time and been the guiding light at Hoisington Asset Management, which has established perhaps the best track record I know of on bond returns. They have been long bonds for quite some time, which has been the correct position, if a difficult and lonely one. Most bond managers think rates are set to rise. Not Lacy. He thinks we will get close to 2% on the 30-year bond and has said so for decades. Dr. Gary Shilling wrote his first book in 1998, called simply Deflation, and followed it up recently with another great work, titled The Age of Deleveraging. He first went long bonds in 1982, which has been one of the great trades of the last 30 years. He lists a whole host of reasons for a deflationary period over the next few years. The “Muddle-Through” economy is deflationary The argument for deflation is rather straightforward. The boom in the US and much of the world from 1982 until 2008 was partially the result of financial innovations and massive leveraging. That process has come to an end, and the private sector is deleveraging and will do so even further as the economy softens and we slip into the next recession. Governments are approaching the end of their ability to borrow money at reasonable rates in Europe, and soon in Japan, and eventually in the US (and that time is not as far off as we would like). I described the whole process in my book Endgame. Assuming the US government deals with its coming deficit crisis in a realistic manner, the results will be deflationary – a big assumption, I grant you! The next big deflationary force is the slowing of the velocity of money. Very simply, money velocity is the rate at which money moves through the economy from one transaction to another and is a good barometer of economic vitality. It has been falling for five years, pretty much as I wrote it would back in 2006. We are now close to the historical average velocity of money; but, since velocity is mean-reverting, it will continue to fall until it bottoms well below the historical average. This cycle takes years, not months, by the way. A slow-growth, muddle-through economy is deflationary. High and persistent unemployment is deflationary. Absent some new piece of data that I just don’t see right now, rates in the US are going lower and are going to stay low for longer than any of us can afford to bet against them. I think the Fed will respond if the government does finally act in a fiscally responsible manner (which would be inherently deflationary), by fighting that deflation with the only tool it has left: the outright monetization of debt. They will call it something else, of course, but that will not alter the bottom line: the money presses will run day and night. They will be able to monetize more debt than you can shake a stick at, and do so without causing a repeat of the 1970s Great Inflation. Yes, it will eventually catch up with us – there is no free lunch – but they are betting on keeping the lid on actual price inflation by raising rates and cutting back on the money supply. We are some years away from that, but we had better listen when The Inflationator says, “I’ll be back.” Anybody who says they know the timing is a lot more confident in their crystal ball than I am. But I think I can see out a year or so, and it looks like continued low rates and deflation. By the way, just to appease the gold bugs out there, given my deflationary call, I will note that quality gold stocks were up hugely during the deflationary Great Depression of the 1930s. Even with the dollar on the gold standard. Just saying. A Quadrillion Here, A Quadrillion There And speaking of more money than we can imagine, and the wholesale monetization of government debt, I’d like to close with an instructive vignette from the Land of the Rising Yen. You may remember Everett Dirksen, the Republican Senator from Illinois who, back in the 1960s, was credited with saying, “A billion here, a billion there, and pretty soon you are talking about real money.” Thorough research fails to confirm that he actually used that line, although one reporter claims he asked Dirksen about it and received the reply, “Oh, I never said that. A newspaper fella misquoted me once, and I thought it sounded so good that I never bothered to deny it.” But that quote has lodged in our collective memory; whether or not he said it, it does make a salient point. Today we have become rather casual in our use of the word trillion. “A trillion dollars” slips so easily from the tongue, but it’s just too big a number for most of us to even fathom. Estimates of the total stars in our galaxy run between 100 and 400 billion. A trillion barrels of oil would fuel the world for over 30 years. One trillion seconds is almost 32,000 years. The mind boggles. Yet today we think almost nothing of adding a trillion dollars every year to the already bloated US debt! In fact, economists like Paul Krugman fume that we are not adding more trillions to the debt each year, as if debt carried no consequences. By this thinking, Greece should not be forced to suffer any austerity because it has taken on too much debt. Rather, other nations should be taxed to give Greece the money that will enable them to go even deeper into debt – debt that it cannot and most likely will not repay! So, I must admit that when I came across this next item, it gave me pause. We turn now to a report published by Bloomberg and authored by my friend Dr. Gary Shilling, talking about the massive debt that has been accumulated by Japan. Gary argues that Japan is reaching a critical point where its debt cannot be financed except by extreme monetization by its central bank, because turning to world markets to sell the debt will drive up interest rates to unsustainable levels. I have made similar arguments. Says Gary: “As Japan’s government debt of 1,085 trillion yen matures over time, it will be subject to … higher refinancing rates. The average maturity of Japanese government debt is six years and 11 months. Yet 17 percent of that debt matures this year, 52 percent in the next five years and 76 percent in the next decade. Markets anticipate, so Japanese bonds throughout the spectrum will probably plummet in price and leap in yield at the first sign of a current- account deficit, maybe even before.” One thousand trillion yen. That’s 32,000,000 years’ worth of seconds. Yes, I know the yen has two extra zeros in relation to the dollar, but we are talking about one quadrillion yen. Are we really ready for the word quadrillion to enter the lexicon in what is supposed to be the developed world? In the case of Japan, we are apparently already there. A hundred years ago, a deficit of US$1 billion would have been unthinkable. We actually had balanced budgets during most of our first 200 years, except during wars and economic crashes. And now we talk trillions, albeit in the wake of inflation that has made the word trillion less than it was 100 years ago. Will our grandchildren in the latter half of this century talk quadrillions? Or quintillions? Is that even thinkable? Let’s just hope the word quadrillion doesn’t come into common parlance any time soon. This article is a reprint from the World Money Analyst. [John Mauldin is a highly sought-after contributor to major financial publications including The Financial Times, The Daily Reckoning, as well as a regular guest on CNBC, Yahoo Tech Ticker, and Bloomberg TV. He also contributes to World Money Analyst – a service that regularly provides up to date coverage on issues and opportunities for international investors. Click here to learn more about our 100% risk-free test drive – including three highly actionable special briefings designed to get you started on the right foot right away – but only available for a limited time.] John Mauldin, International Man I am frequently asked in meetings or after a speech whether I think we will have inflation or deflation. “Yes,” I readily reply, trying hard not to smirk, as the questioner tries to digest the answer. And while my answer is flippant, it’s also the truth, as I do expect both outcomes. Following the obligatory chuckle from the rest of the group comes a follow-up request for a few more specifics. And they are that I expect we will first see deflation and then inflation, but the key is the timing. Recessions are by definition deflationary. Deleveraging events are also deflationary. A recession accompanied by deleveraging is deflationary in spades. That is why central banks worldwide have been able to print money in amounts that in prior periods would have sent inflation spiraling out of control. This drives gold bugs nuts, but they are not factoring in the velocity of money. If velocity were flat, inflation would be quite significant by now. But velocity has been falling and is going to fall further. The US Fed and the ECB are going to be able to print more money than we can imagine without stoking inflation … at least for a while. One of the longtime champions of the deflationary outlook has been my friend David Rosenberg (formerly chief economist at Merrill and now with Gluskin Sheff in Toronto). He has been talking for years about a target of 1.5% for the 10-year US bond. Today, as I’m writing this, we got down to 1.5% and did not even pause, ending the day at 1.47%. I will also note that I spoke with Rich Yamarone, the chief economist at Bloomberg, and he said he believes we will scare 50 basis points (the 10-year T-bill hits 0.50%) before we are through. To which Rosenberg replied in a later conversation, “He’s nuts!” Look at this table of 10-year bond yields:last_img read more

Cambridge Analytica firm at the heart of Facebook scandal

Explore further © 2018 AFP At the centre of a scandal over alleged misuse of Facebook users’ personal data, Cambridge Analytica is a communications firm hired by those behind Donald Trump’s successful US presidential bid. According to reports, Cambridge Analytica stole information from 50 million Facebook users’ profiles to help design software to predict and influence voters’ choices UK lawmaker: Facebook misled Parliament over data leak risk This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. What has the company been accused of?According to the New York Times and Britain’s Observer newspapers, Cambridge Analytica stole information from 50 million Facebook users’ profiles in the tech giant’s biggest-ever data breach, to help them design software to predict and influence voters’ choices at the ballot box.University of Cambridge psychologist Aleksandr Kogan created a personality prediction test app, thisisyourdigitallife, which was downloaded by 270,000 people. Citation: Cambridge Analytica: firm at the heart of Facebook scandal (2018, March 19) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-cambridge-analytica-firm-heart-facebook.html An affiliate of British firm Strategic Communication Laboratories (SCL), Cambridge Analytica has offices in London, New York, Washington, as well as Brazil and Malaysia.Here’s the story behind the company using data to fuel political campaigns:What does Cambridge Analytica do?The company boasts it can “find your voters and move them to action” through data-driven campaigns and a team including data scientists and behavioural psychologists.”Within the United States alone, we have played a pivotal role in winning presidential races as well as congressional and state elections,” with data on more than 230 million American voters, Cambridge Analytica claims on its website.Speaking to TechCrunch in 2017, CEO Alexander Nix said the firm was “always acquiring more” data.”Every day we have teams looking for new data sets,” he told the site. Who are the company’s clients?As well as working on the election which saw Trump reach the White House, Cambridge Analytica has been involved in political campaigns around the world. In the US, analysts harnessed data to generate thousands of messages targeting voters through their profiles on social media such as Facebook, Snapchat, or the Pandora Radio streaming service. British press have credited Cambridge Analytica with providing services to pro-Brexit campaign Leave.EU, but Nix has denied working for the group.Globally, Cambridge Analytica said it has worked in Italy, Kenya, South Africa, Colombia and Indonesia. Cambridge Analytica CEO Alexander Nix has said the firm was “always acquiring more” data The tool allowed Kogan to access information such as content Facebook users had “liked” and the city they listed on their profile, which was then passed to SCL and Cambridge Analytica.The Observer reported the app also collected information from the Facebook friends of people who had taken the test.Christopher Wylie, a former Cambridge Analytica employee, worked with Kogan and told Canadian television channel CBC the company used “private data they acquired without consent”. Who else is involved?US hedge fund billionaire Robert Mercer—and major Republican party donor—bankrolled Cambridge Analytica to the tune of $15 million (12 million euros).The Observer said it was headed at the time by Steve Bannon, a top Trump adviser until he was fired last summer.How has Facebook responded?Facebook suspended SCL and Cambridge Analytica, as well as Kogan and Wylie.In explaining its decision on Friday, the social media giant said the thisisyourdigitallife app was legitimate, but accused Kogan of subsequently violating Facebook’s terms by passing the data on to SCL/Cambridge Analytica.Facebook said it found out what had happened in 2015 and was told all parties involved had deleted the data.”The claim that this is a data breach is completely false,” Facebook said in a new statement on Saturday, saying app users knowingly provided their information. read more

US ups pressure on Europe over 5G infrastructure from Chinas Huawei

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Huawei’s founder says world can’t live without it Citation: US ups pressure on Europe over 5G infrastructure from China’s Huawei (2019, March 14) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-ups-pressure-europe-5g-infrastructure.html Explore further Chinese telecom giant Huawei has strenuously denied allegations its equipment could be used for espionagecenter_img The US and several other Western nations, fearful of the security risks posed by a company closely tied to the Chinese government, have shut Huawei out of tenders for the development of super-fast fifth-generation, or 5G, networks.”We’re concerned about their telecommunications backbone being compromised in the sense that, particularly with 5G, the bandwidth capability and ability to pull data is incredible,” US General Curtis Scaparrotti, NATO’s Supreme Allied Commander in Europe, told US lawmakers.”If it also is inside of their defense communications, then we’re not going to communicate with them” across those systems, the general said before the House Armed Services Committee.”And for the military, that would be a problem.”Scaparrotti’s comments came during questioning about trade talks in Europe, and Germany in particular, with Chinese telecom groups such as Huawei.The company has been charged by the US justice department of stealing trade secrets, obstructing a criminal investigation and evading economic sanctions on Iran.Its 5G equipment is reputed to be much further advanced than those of rivals Ericsson and Nokia, which has made it attractive for mobile operators looking to quickly roll out new networks.The next-generation systems will bring near-instantaneous connectivity that can enable futuristic technologies such as self-driving cars.Chinese law obliges companies headquartered in the country to provide technical assistance to intelligence services, but Huawei has strenuously denied allegations its equipment could be used for espionage.Kathryn Wheelbarger, acting US assistant secretary of defense for international affairs, told the committee Huawei represents a “threat” to Europe.Private and military concerns”I can assure you that in all our conversations with all our European partners, we make very clear the threat of Chinese investment or development of the telecommunications infrastructure in Europe,” Wheelbarger said.These concerns relate to the “security of our communications, both private… as well as military,” she said.The two Pentagon officials refused to give further details in public about their concerns, telling elected officials they would discuss the subject in depth during a later closed session.Germany is due to launch auctions in mid-March for future mobile telecommunications infrastructure.On Monday, The Wall Street Journal reported the US had warned Berlin about future “information sharing” if it uses “untrusted vendors” in its 5G infrastructure.The newspaper said the US Ambassador to Berlin, Richard Grenell, had sent a letter to German Economy Minister Peter Altmaier warning that in such a case, the US could scale down intelligence and other information exchanges.On Tuesday, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Berlin would consult Washington over using technology made by Huawei, although “we will define our standards for ourselves.”Asked about the security standards that Europe could adopt to protect against Chinese espionage, Wheelbarger said there were none.”Having looked into Huawei quite a bit a few years ago, I realized the challenges of even having a mitigation plan or strategy for the 4G infrastructure,” she said.”Given this sort of generational shift that is between 4G and 5G, I am not aware of something that would give us the kind of security we would need to mitigate the challenges it would impose on us.” © 2019 AFP The US upped pressure on Europe Wednesday to avoid turning to Huawei for 5G telecom infrastructure, with a top commander saying NATO forces would cease communicating with their German colleagues if Berlin teams up with the Chinese firm.last_img read more

The Worlds Largest Iceberg Is 2 Years Old Today and Already Drifting

first_img Photo Gallery: Antarctica’s Pine Island Glacier Cracks They grow up so fast. The iceberg called A68 — currently the largest iceberg in the world, weighing about 1.1 trillion tons (1 trillion metric tons) — calved off Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf on July 12, 2017, two years ago today. What has this massive, frozen toddler been up to since it broke free? Mostly just spinning. As you can see in this awesome time-lapse footage taken over the last 18 months by the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-1 satellites, and shared today by glaciologist Adrian Luckman, the hulking glacier has been steadily spinning away from its native ice shelf, drifting north about 155 miles (250 kilometers) from where it began. According to Luckman, that’s some impressive mobility for arguably the largest free-moving object on Earth. [Images of Melt: Earth’s Vanishing Ice]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65929-worlds-largest-iceberg-drifting-toward-death.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  “At 100 miles (160 km) long by only a couple of hundred meters thick, the aspect ratio of Iceberg A68 is more like a credit card than a typically imagined iceberg,” Luckman, a professor at Swansea University in the UK, wrote on his website. “All the more surprising then, that despite grounding on the sea floor several times, Iceberg A68 remains in pretty much the same shape that it had when it calved away 2 years ago.” Alas, every step forward is a step away from home — and toward certain doom. While iceberg A68 continues to pirouette in a current called the Weddell Gyre (named for Antarctica’s Weddell Sea), it moves ever closer to the pull of the South Atlantic Ocean, where it will be gently swept northward to warmer climes. Many icebergs that find themselves on this path (part of an oceanic conveyor belt known as “iceberg alley,” according to BBC News) end up screeching to a halt near South Georgia Island, a remote British Overseas Territory about 1,000 miles (1,600 km) north of Antarctica. Icebergs of similar size to A68 have drifted for 5 years before making landfall, splitting into ever smaller chunks along the way. Other bergs drift farther north, ultimately melting near South America. While A68’s fate is largely up to the whims of the Atlantic Ocean at this point, scientists will continue monitoring the frigid tot’s progress from space as long as they can. Visually, it may not be as interesting as a square iceberg or coffin iceberg, but A68 still our iceberg — and we’ll be proud of it no matter how it dies. In Photos: Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf Through Time Iconic Photos of Earth from Space Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoairdogusa.comThe World’s Best Washable Air Purifierairdogusa.comUndoFinance101What Are The Best States To Retire In?Finance101UndoBirch Gold GroupThis IRS Tax Law is Sweeping the U.S.Birch Gold GroupUndoAnti-Snoring SolutionA Simple Fix for Snoring And Sleep ApneaAnti-Snoring SolutionUndolast_img read more