‘No doubt’ that resolution can be found for Glenties playground

first_imgIt is hoped that the Glenties Community Playground can be reopened to the public soon following its sudden closure last week.Families were shocked to find padlocks on the playground gates before the Halloween holidays after the Glenties Playground Committee closed the space due to funding issues.The committee is calling for Donegal County Council to take over responsibility for the area as funding is needed to cover insurance and upkeep costs. It is now hoped that a resolution can be found to reopen the playground for children again.Glenties Community Playground. Photo: Sue Barrington PhotographyCllr Anthony Molloy said: “We are talking to the council to achieve a favourable outcome on everything for the good of everybody.“I have no doubt that we can get a resolution to get this playground opened as soon as possible.”Cllr Molloy, who met with the playground committee on Saturday, said that upgrade works are a key issue behind the closure of the space. “It’s been a few years since there was any sort of upgrading, and with playground likes this we need to spend money to keep things in working order.”Glenties Community Playground. Photo: Sue Barrington PhotographyCllr Molloy added he is confident that the local council can find the necessary funding to upgrade the area and improve children’s safety so it can reopen once more.“The playground is closed for two weeks but I am confident that we can all come to a good outcome.” ‘No doubt’ that resolution can be found for Glenties playground was last modified: October 30th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:cllr anthony molloyGlenties Community Playgroundlast_img read more

Reports say Blues are confident on Remy, QPR want duo and Diame is joining Palace

first_imgCrystal Palace are set to beat QPR to the signing of West Ham midfielder Momo Diame, the Sunday People say.Rangers manager Harry Redknapp has long been keen to bring in Diame but it is claimed that Eagles boss Neil Warnock has won the race to sign him. Hull were also reported to be interested.Redknapp wants to sign Aaron Lennon as well as Andros Townsend from Tottenham, the Mail on Sunday claim.Diame has long been one of Redknapp’s transfer targetsThe Daily Star Sunday say Redknapp is also looking to buy forward Fabio Borini from Liverpool.Chelsea are extremely confident of signing Loic Remy from QPR despite Arsenal launching a late bid to capture the France striker, according to the Sunday Telegraph. Related West London Sport story: Arsenal make their move for QPR’s Remy  Meanwhile, the Mail say Paris St-Germain are keen to tie up a loan deal for Chelsea goalkeeper Petr Cech.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Zuma talks partnerships, jobs and more

first_img13 February 2012President Jacob Zuma has called on all South Africans to participate in taking the country forward.The government was doing its part, he said; now it was time for the rest of us to “play your part” and invest in South Africa, he said, calling on business, labour, civil society and residents to form a partnership with the state.Zuma was speaking at a business breakfast briefing hosted by Brand South Africa, the SABC and The New Age newspaper at Grand West Casino in Cape Town on Friday.Just a few hours before, he had said goodnight to his guests after delivering his fourth State of the Nation address in Parliament.The mood at Grand West was jovial; everyone was relaxed and satisfied. The President himself was fresh-faced and upbeat.At the breakfast were government ministers, deputy ministers and business people, all armed with their questions. The briefing was broadcast live on SABC, and the general public was able to send in their questions for the President on Twitter and SMS.The openness of the dialogue was precedent-setting for a sitting South African president, and certainly marked a change in the government’s way of doing business.“We want to do things differently. We want to take South Africa forward. We believe we’ve made progress, but we know that there are challenges,” Zuma began. The government was tackling the economy in a way that it had not done in the past. “We can’t only do politics; we must also do the economy.”Zuma said the government’s major programme was infrastructure as it believed that building infrastructure would give opportunities to all.The government was creating an enabling environment and building infrastructure, and business needed to invest in opportunities that would open up. This would bring jobs and so improve the quality of life for all.“We have discussed the difficulties of doing business in South Africa. We are opening this. You must participate in this window period.”Partnership was a big theme for Zuma, who called on business to work with the government to deal with the negative impact of job losses. Training was mentioned as a possibility. “We must create the kind of projects that can create jobs.”What is differentAsked what was different for workers in his latest State of the Nation address – we’ve heard this all before, was the criticism – he said: “We’ve created an environment where jobs can be created. We have a massive infrastructure programme; there is money for it.“The private sector must see the opportunities for investment, and invest. The logical consequence of that is jobs.“You can’t have jobs without investment, and the government is creating an environment for investment.”He had three items on his wish list from the private sector: invest in the country, have confidence in the country, and big business must help small business.A hot potato issue, especially given that the Mining Indaba has just finished in Cape Town, is the nationalisation of mines. The final word on the topic came from the President.Setting many minds at rest, and garnering a round of applause, he said: “Nationalisation is not our policy. It is as clear as that. Our policy is a mixed economy.”Of potential, he said Africa was one of the fastest growing regions in the world, and the country should invest in that potential. “South Africa has the potential to grow. Working together, we can take advantage of Africa, the BRICS countries and the changing economy. Invest in this country; invest in your future.”Brief questionsAsked what keeps him awake at night, the President answered: the plight of the poor. “I am kept awake thinking of ways to alleviate their plight.”He pointed to South Africa’s strategic global importance in regards to shipping, saying it did nothing in its waters for its economy, despite the shipping lanes that passed the country. There were massive opportunities in this sector.Of toll roads, another hot potato, Zuma said they were necessary for road maintenance. However, the issue was not closed. South Africa was unusual in that the government was open to discussion of ideas and policies it had put forward.In answer to a question from the floor, the President said fronting in business – whereby companies use black people as figureheads to up their black economic empowerment ratings – would be punished.The details of what that punishment would be still had to be worked out, though. The law must come first, he said, and the details would come after.Rural developmentOf small towns, their factories and rural areas, he said the government was talking of reviving the economy and development of those regions as part of its plan.Asked about what was being done to stop farm murders, he pointed out that as crime was falling, so were farm murders. The police were working with farmers to stop this crime.The police were also working hard to address the issue of piracy. Many raids had already been carried out.Regarding service delivery, the government had delivered to some degree, but there were still challenges. There was electricity and water available where there had been none before. “The question of infrastructure remains a challenge.”The Italian ambassador offered his country’s and Europe’s help – we could share experiences, promote investments and help you avoid the mistakes we made in industrial policy and job creation, he said, to which Zuma replied that South Africa was certainly keen to learn what went wrong, and what would happen to alleviate the present economic crisis.Questioned about land reform, Zuma again spoke of the Green Paper on Land Reform he had mentioned in his State of the Nation address. “We are looking at those issues,” he said.“The fact is that lots of land was taken away and many people were left landless. We can’t let this continue. We need frank views from South Africans on how to solve land issues.”First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

Teaching children to love themselves

first_imgMany of the children come from disadvantaged backgrounds so Lovy encourages them to develop their self-love and to use this strength in their environment. Work with the mirror, using exercises from the Lovy book, promotes self-awareness and can help a child to deal with a negative self-image. Lovy is aimed at all children aged five to ten years.(Images: Lovy – Loves You)MEDIA CONTACTS • Dee Boehner Kidz2Kidz Trust+27 83 460 4449RELATED ARTICLES• Giving children a sense of pride• The right to dignity• Let’s learn and honour Children’s Act• Pupils get a lesson on dignity• Putting children’s rights firstCadine PillayAccording to life coach Annett Burmester, without knowing it, we often live what is expected of us and not what we truly want. We focus too much on others when it is important to understand our needs, fears and feelings, to recognise our beliefs and behaviour patterns.“What about your attitude towards yourself and your life?” This is the message Burmester wishes to convey to children with backgrounds that often demoralise them.Giving children a chanceOriginally from Germany, Burmester met Dee Boehner, founder of the Cape Town-based Kidz2Kidz Trust, in February 2010 while volunteering with the Santa Shoebox Project in the city.“I fell in love with Cape Town and the city gave me so much which I felt compelled to give back,” Burmester says.As a life coach, the main focus of Burmester’s work is teaching self-love, which is the most important inner strength for more happiness in life. She is also an illustrator, designer and author working on a book about self-love – a perfect mix to create a new project for the children in need.Boehner then proposed the creation of a short book to illustrate the idea of self-love. So Burmester wrote a story book with the character called Lovy, designed the Lovy toy and came up with the name which derives from “Loves You”.Born in South Africa, Lovy is the character portrayed as the hero in the books, and the figure is aimed at all children aged five to ten years to show them how loveable they are.The Lovy books contain a moral lesson, which will help the kids to become more aware of themselves.“It is a good way to allow them to start realising ‘that’s me’ and ‘I am important’,” Burmester says.The story has been written in three languages English, Afrikaans, Sesotho and isiXhosa. More Lovy books in different languages will be available in the future.In 2011 Lovy was run as a pilot project in the Western Cape and in 2012 launched successfully in Gauteng. The intention is to expand the Lovy project around the country.Burmester also holds follow-up sessions, where social workers sit in, with any child who needs additional coaching.Increasing self-esteem Burmester went on to develop Lovy as a special coaching project for children living in children’s homes and orphanages to help them to build their self-esteem and realise their potential. The project carries out group workshops using the Lovy Kit which comprises a Lovy book, a mirror and the cuddly toy called Lovy.“The Lovy toy is important because children need something to cuddle,” Burmester adds. “Having Lovy will give them a feeling of security and warmth. Lovy is like a friend who is always with them and listening to their feelings. They often own nothing, not even a toy.”The Lovy toys are made by seamstresses in the townships which provide opportunities for employment and empowerment.During the workshops Lovy shows children that they are loveable, unique and special. Work with the mirror, using exercises from the Lovy book, promotes self-awareness and can help a child to deal with a negative self-image.“Mirrors are often absent in children’s homes and orphanages. We use the mirror so that the children can say ‘I love me’ – using their very own name, looking into the mirror,” explains Burmester.“Nobody can take away their pain, but they will learn to love themselves and thus gain more and more self-confidence every day.”The mirrors are made from recycled materials by the children as part of the Art2Kidz Project to involve them creatively in the Lovy intiative.The right to be loved and respected“We all have the right to be loved and respected,” says Burmester. “We need to give these children a chance for a better and peaceful world. They are our future too.”Many of the children come from disadvantaged backgrounds so Lovy encourages them to develop their self-love and to use this strength in their environment.“These children have experienced more violence than luck or love in their young lives,” she says. “We show them how they can develop their love of self and use this strength in their environment.”Lovy is orange which is the colour for children as it symbolises joy and confidence. In colour therapy, the colour orange is used to help overcome psychological and mental exhaustion.“Its purpose is to bring more love and happiness into their lives as they are abandoned, afraid, unloved and hurt,” says Burmester. “They will learn to believe in themselves and live again. It will also teach them that we all have a great deal of love in ourselves and that there is nothing wrong with being an orphan.“It touches me again and again when I see how these children soak up Lovy’s message and how they integrate this into their lives.”The Lovy days coincide with 14 February, Valentine’s Day. They are celebrated in children’s homes and orphanages with workshops that share the message: “You are loveable, unique and special”.last_img read more

Energy-Saving Clothes Dryers Hit U.S. Markets

first_imgSeveral advantages over conventional modelsConventional dryers heat air inside a drum to drive moisture out of clothes. With most models, the moist, humid air is vented to the outside, which also takes some conditioned air from inside the house with it. So there’s a double energy penalty — high power consumption to run the dryer, and additional power to heat or cool inside air to replace what’s been lost.In Whirlpool’s heat pump clothes dryer, a refrigeration loop condenses the moisture picked up from the clothes and routes it to the same drain used by the clothes washer. Heat from the process is recirculated back to the drum. While the dryer has to be connected to a drain, it is not vented to the outside, so it can be installed in more places than a conventional dryer can.The design has won the EPA’s Emerging Technology Award, and earlier this month picked up an Innovation Award at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.According to Whirlpool, the dryer uses up to 73% less energy in its “Eco” mode when compared to a pre-2004 conventional dryer. The Super Efficient Dryer Initiative estimates that heat-pump clothes dryers are 50 percent to 60 percent more efficient than conventional models.The HybridCare has three speed settings — Eco, Balanced and Speed — with average drying times of about 60 minutes, according to the company. A 1,300-watt heating element kicks in when the Speed cycle is selected. The company also says the dryer operates at lower temperatures than a conventional dryer, so it’s not as tough on delicate fabrics.It’s not clear whether the LG dryer is vented to the outside or taps into the washer drain like the Whirlpool model does. Those details aren’t posted at the company’s web site, and the company didn’t respond to queries. Clothes dryers are the energy hogs of home appliances, accounting for 6 percent of total residential energy use and costing U.S. consumers $9 billion a year in power bills. Dryers use more electricity — an estimated 900 kilowatt hours a year — than either a refrigerator or a clothes washer.Homeowners in Europe have long had access to dryers that use heat-pump technology instead of electrical resistance elements or gas burners to dry clothes. And now two manufacturers, Whirlpool and LG, are rolling out heat-pump clothes dryers for U.S. buyers.Whirlpool’s 7.3-cubic-foot HybridCare clothes dryer is similar in size to conventional dryers on the U.S. market (although larger than most European models). The HybridCare comes with a suggested retail price of $1,799 in white, more than four times the cost of a base model Whirlpool available at Lowe’s.LG Electronics says that its Eco Hybrid heat-pump dryer, also with a 7.3-cubic foot capacity, was the first dryer in the U.S. to combine conventional vented drying with heat pump technology and uses about 50 percent less electricity than a conventional electric dryer. It sells for about $1,700.last_img read more

A California Utility Looks for New Answers in Solar Integration Puzzle

first_imgA new business modelA variety of utility pilot projects around the country are designed to see how batteries can be brought into the mix and ease the sharp ups and downs in supply and demand. But, Greentech Media reports, the plan from SDG&E is unusual in that the utility would not own the batteries.SDG&E calls this a “new business and revenue model for third-party ownership of distribution infrastructure,” Greentech Media said, which would help the utility replace lost earnings it would normally see from grid infrastructure projects.James Fine, senior economist with the Environmental Defense Fund, called the plan “a little ray of light through the darkness of the traditional utility business model.” He told Jeff St. John of Greentech Media, “It’s a new way to sustain and support the utility operations, to get away from the incentive to put more steel in the ground.”It’s also complex. The customers who supply the batteries, for example, must have access to information allowing them to share their stored energy while keeping enough for their own needs. How to include third-party providers, such as SolarCity and Tesla, also will be difficult to resolve.St. John writes that while the distribution resource plans submitted by California utilities have a lot of new information about what distributed energy can do for the grid, they don’t spell out how much money customers and other third-party providers could earn.What SDG&E’s plan does say, however, is this: “Customers taking advantage of the incentive will 1) accept a new dynamic rate that more acutely aligns charging and discharging with specific grid needs and 2) allow SDG&E to directly control the storage system’s charge and discharge functions during a limited number of high-load hours annually.”The more control a customer is willing to cede to the utility, the more the customer would benefit. San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) is proposing a novel way of integrating more battery storage on the grid to help manage electric loads more effectively: invite utility customers to install their own batteries and make it worth their while with a new rate.According to a post at Greentech Media, SDG&E has made the proposal for a pilot program part of its distribution resource plan that it and two other investor-owned utilities in California were required to submit to regulators earlier this month.All the details are not spelled out. But the basic idea is that customers who supplied their own batteries and allowed the utility to control them at certain times would earn a “new residential energy storage rate.”The pitch comes as utilities look for ways to integrate an increasing number of photovoltaic (PV) systems on the grid, what are called distributed energy resources, or DERs. Batteries, whether they are jumbo utility-sized installations or simpler residential-sized units, can help even out the peaks and valleys of grid demand by storing energy at times of overproduction and sending some of that power back to the grid at times of very high demand.By shaving peak loads, batteries can help utilities avoid expensive grid upgrades, such as new transmission lines and transformers.last_img read more