Syracuse finishes 10th at NCAA Championships

first_img Published on March 11, 2017 at 11:28 pm Contact Tomer: tdlanger@syr.edu | @tomer_langer Syracuse men’s indoor track and field finished 10th at the NCAA Championships on Saturday afternoon, the best finish in program history. The Orange was led by distance runner Justyn Knight and hurdler Freddie Crittenden. Both were runner-ups in their respective events.Adam Palamar, the other SU member to qualify, ran the mile, finishing with a time of 4:06:47, good for fifth place. Crittenden was next, running the 60-meter hurdles. It was his second straight second-place finish at the NCAA Championships. He ran in 7.67 seconds, nine seconds from first place.Knight ran the 3000 meters in 7:56.21. He was just three-tenths of a second slower than the first-place finisher, Oregon’s Edward Cheserek, who finished with a time of 7:55.91. It was the second time he’s been the runner-up in an NCAA Championship. He previously finished second in the NCAA Cross Country Championships in November.SU opens its outdoor track and field season on March 31 at the Florida Relays. Comments AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Bayern Munich win German Cup and secure historic treble

first_imgMario Gomez scored twice as Bayern Munich completed a historic treble with a nervy 3-2 win over Stuttgart in the German Cup final in Berlin.In Jupp Heynckes’ final game in charge, Bayern became the first German team to win the Bundesliga, the European Cup and the German Cup in the same season.Thomas Mueller scored from the spot before Gomez scored twice in the second period to put Bayern three ahead.Martin Harnick managed to pull two back for Stuttgart but Bayern held on.The Bavarian club, who will be taken over by former Barcelona coach Pep Guardiola on 26 June, finished the season with 15 wins from their final 16 matches and have only suffered one defeat since October.And after the match Heynckes said: “I have decided to give a closing press conference on Tuesday and then I will reveal my future plans.”Heynckes, 68, had previously said he was too old to coach overseas but he has been linked with a return to Real Madrid, who he coached to the 1998 Champions League title at the end of his single season as their coach. “It’s unbelievable what the team and coach have achieved over the whole season,” said Bayern captain Philipp Lahm.“They were tough months but now we’re being rewarded for them.”Only Celtic in 1967, Ajax in 1972, PSV Eindhoven in 1988, Manchester United in 1999, Guardiola’s Barcelona in 2009, and Inter Milan in 2010 previously won the treble.Mueller set Bayern on their way with a penalty after Lahm was tripped by Ibrahima Traore.After the break Gomez converted crosses from Lahm and Mueller. Austrian international Harnick scored with a fine header from Gotoku Sakai’s cross before setting up a tense finish with a firm shot after he was denied by Bayern keeper Manuel Neuer.But the Bundesliga and European champions withstood heavy late pressure to complete the treble and send Heynckes out on a high.last_img read more

Scandal rocks FIFA Player of the Year awards as coaches cry foul

first_imgCoaches from Bolivia, Albania, Equatorial Guinea, Dominican Republic, Fiji, Kuwait and Vanuatu have alleged that the 2013 Ballon d’Or votes were rigged, according to Catalan outlet La Xarxa and and Spanish newspaper Mundo Deportivo. Via Danish paper BT and Norway’s Dagbladet (h/t 101 Great Goals), the aforementioned coaches all suggest their original votes were recorded and published differently from what they had initially submitted. Jorvan Vieira, who coaches the Kuwait national team, reportedly told La Xarxa (via BT), “I think there has been any fraud here. I voted for (Zlatan) Ibrahimovic.” That despite FIFA’s official record of the submissions showing that he voted for Lionel Messi as the winner, followed by Neymar and the eventual winner, Cristiano Ronaldo.  The same applies to the coach of the Fijian national team, Juan Carlos Buzzetti. FIFA recorded his vote with Ronaldo in first position ahead of Franck Ribery and Robert Lewandowski. He also insists his votes have been amended, claiming, “I voted for Cristiano, Messi and Ribery. I have in no way voted Lewandowski. He is not on par with the other three.” But the harshest, most colourful of all the criticism came from Albania’s coach, Gianni De Biasi. He didn’t hold back in a statement (NSFW), telling Mundo Deportivo what he thought of the scenario after his first-place vote for Ronaldo apparently changed to one for Zlatan Ibrahimovic.  “I gave five points to Ronaldo, three to Messi and one to Ibrahimovic. I did not give five to Ibrahimovic,” De Biasi said. “This is bullshit and lies.” These allegations are the second within a week which refer to the Ballon d’Or votes being doctored, as Qatar national coach Fahad Al Zarraa previously claimed his president forced him to vote for Ronaldo, as per sportsfan.com.  The showpiece event saw Ronaldo pick up the gong for the second time in his career, staving off competition from Messi and Ribery, who accompanied him on the three-man shortlist. Whilst it would be difficult to deny that Ronaldo deserved the award, these emerging allegations will cast doubts over the validity of the vote, especially after FIFA extended the voting deadline until after Ronaldo’s one-man show in the World Cup playoffs, according to Ian Ladyman of the Daily Mail. The extension only served to raise suspicions that FIFA were pushing for a Ronaldo win after Sepp Blatter’s unsavoury remarks about the Portuguese winger.  The FIFA president claimed back in November that Ronaldo has “more expenses at the hairdresser” than his great rival Messi, per The Guardian. Ronaldo scored a sensational 66 goals in 56 games in 2013, per BBC Sport. He’s started 2014 in excellent fashion too, scoring four times in Real Madrid’s first five games of 2014, per WhoScored.last_img read more

England Golf County Rules Schools heading to the North and South of England

first_img England Golf has announced that it will be running another two County Rules Schools this spring, at venues in Cheshire and Devon. Following the success of seven County Rules Schools in 2011, which proved to be very popular attracting over 200 delegates, England Golf are delighted to be offering the chance for more people to participate in rules education. To date, 67 of those delegates who sat the County Rules exam last year achieved a distinction. This in turn has provided their respective County Unions with a potential new source of qualified ‘County Referees’ to assist at county tournaments. Barry Morgan, Secretary of Hampshire County Golf Union, who hosted a Rules School at Basingstoke golf club last year said, “The England Golf County Rules School has proved to be an invaluable tool, enabling Hampshire Golf Union to formulate the nucleus of a tournament panel for our County events. Those that attended are now much more confident in their knowledge of the rules and the school has given them the confidence and self belief to be able to deal with rules situations on and off the golf course”. Toby Thorne, England Golf Deputy Championship Manager says, “The schools cater for all levels of rules knowledge, endorsed by the wide variety of delegates who have attended and the feedback that we have received. There is something for everyone to learn about the rules of golf and with the new changes coming into effect from 1st January it will be important to ensure all delegates are aware of and well informed about these changes. The format of the School, with a mix of outdoor practical demonstrations, refereeing role-play scenarios and some indoor tutorials, keeps everyone interested and on their toes throughout the day”. Delegates should have at least a basic understanding of the Rules of Golf before attending the school, although advice will be given on how to prepare for the exam which is several weeks after the first day of practical tuition. The following dates and venues are finalised for spring 2012: Cheshire: Day 1: Wed 28th March Day 2 (inc. Exam): Thu 3rd May (North) Entry deadline: Fri 9th March Venue: Sandiway Golf Club, Northwich Devon: Day 1: Thu 26th April Day 2 (inc. Exam): Thu 7th June (South West) Entry deadline: Fri 30th March Venue: Exeter Golf & Country Club, Exeter The fee for attending an England Golf County Rules School is £50, which includes all tuition, lunches, teas and coffees on both days. Although hosted in a particular county, delegates from other counties will also be made welcome. Further Schools are being scheduled for Autumn 2012 and will be announced in due course. For more information regarding the England Golf County Rules Schools and how to register for an event, visit www.englishgolfunion.org/rulesschool. 24 Jan 2012 England Golf County Rules Schools heading to the North and South of England last_img read more

It’s not crazy for African-American World Cup fans to root for Ghana

first_imgUnited States’ John Brooks, second from left, scores his side’s second goal during the group G World Cup soccer match between Ghana and the United States at the Arena das Dunas in Natal, Brazil, Monday, June 16, 2014. The United States defeated Ghana 2-1.(AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)Dear Race Manners:In Team USA’s World Cup game against Ghana, I found myself cheering for Ghana. On Twitter I was accused of being unpatriotic, including by some people I respect. It’s hard to explain, but what can I say? I wanted the African team – or maybe the brown(est) team – to win (I’m Black). Am I wrong? –If your friends are going to commit to tweeting accusations about patriotism at those who cheer for squads other than Team USA, they’ll be busy. I used the social network to ask, “Raise your hand if you cheer for World Cup teams playing against Team USA because of something to do with your racial/ethnic identity,” and received a chorus of affirmative responses, like this one:Jenée ? @jdesmondharris@BougieLa Details? Are you *from* somewhere else or is it a #blackthing like with @graceishuman?Grace @graceishuman@jdesmondharris I’m Nigerian, so it’s definitely that in part. But it’s also just being #TeamBrownPeople @BougieLaSome responses, like “If by ‘racial/ethnic identity’ you mean a hatred of White supremacy, militarism, and hegemony, mine is raised” (the author of that tweet preferred to stay anonymous), had nothing to do with direct family ties.Other fans apparently split the difference between rooting based on citizenship and rooting based on other interests – racially and culturally inspired interests – and cheered for both.Cherae Robinson, writing about “the complicated life of African-American World Cup fans,” observed that in the Brooklyn, N.Y., bar where she watched the Ghana game, “Almost every Bblack person in the bar was up on their feet rooting for the Black Stars with the same fervor as they had cheered team USA an hour before.”Given that we’re in an ethnically diverse country, talking about an international sport, there’s nothing strange or shocking about this choice. Just think of Irish fans in Boston cheering for Ireland, or Italian Americans in South Philadelphia or the North Side of Chicago rooting for Italy, says Gregory Carr, chair of Howard University’s Afro-American-studies department. After all, in his view, “Our experience is also an immigrant experience.”Jenée Desmond-Harris (Courtesy Photo)Lineage, the Diaspora and an Affinity for the UnderdogBut there’s another reason you and other African Americans who don’t think of themselves as immigrants and can’t trace their lineage to any particular place on the continent might have cheered for Ghana.“For many, rooting interest is as wide as not only the African continent but African people, and our passion connects to people of Africa worldwide,” says Carr. Plus, he says, all sports allow people to give expression to greater passions, and for plenty of black people, those passions include concern for the plight of people we perceive as underdogs, or oppressed.So I’m guessing your choice wasn’t just about nonwhite skin color. (It that were the case, you could choose just about any World Cup team, including Team USA, with its large handful of Black players – many of them German – to root for.) Rather, it was born from a lived experience. “We’ve had a hard time in this country,” says Carr, “and in those moments when we can give expression to what’s in our heart, we do it.”Patriotism Is not at issueTo be clear, there’s a difference between having cheering interests in an international competition that don’t line up with American nationalism and actually being unpatriotic. Tell your Twitter trolls to keep in mind that this wasn’t a war, it was a sporting event, otherwise known as a game. It’s a mistake to confuse affinity for a team in such a context to patriotism or loyalty to one’s country, and it’s safe for everyone to settle down in that area.Plus, African Americans have always been plenty patriotic, even if many of them experience that sentiment in a way that’s more complicated—and, yes, even more painful—than some might understand.“I love this country not because it’s perfect but because we’ve always been able to move it closer to perfection,” President Barack Obama once put it. In Carr’s words, African-American patriotism has largely been pragmatic. (“We have sacrificed blood in every war the U.S. has fought, but remember that in the Revolutionary War, more people fought against the Colonies than for them,” he says. “We didn’t care about the Colonies. We cared about being free!”)This distinction may be unnerving to those who are shocked to learn that some African Americans see the country, as Carr puts it, as “less of a common project and more of a common context.”“We have a Black president; when will you be satisfied?” your Twitter friends will ask at this point. Answer: Given the way White supremacy and racism and their accompanying policies are playing out in this country right now and affecting people’s lives up until this very moment, with little sign of improvement, probably not for a while.That’s heavy, but really, let’s keep your expression of support for the Ghana team in your local sports bar or on your Twitter timeline in perspective. Shouting “Goal!” when a non-American team scores “doesn’t mean we’re gonna set fire to cities; it doesn’t mean we’re gonna quit the military,” says Carr. “It’s just a statement that in this battle that doesn’t cost anybody any blood, I’m gonna root for the cats who represents what I identify with. ’Cause I feel like it.”African-American rooting interests are often tied up with larger issuesAnyone surprised by your choice of teams should take a trip down memory lane to see how African Americans’ sense of connectivity to Black people worldwide and of social justice without regard for borders has informed whom many of us have rooted for.Carr can tick off examples: Teófilo Stevenson, the Black Cuban boxer (“African Americans cheered for him! They loved him”); Olympic ice-skater Surya Bonaly (“We didn’t care that she was from France!); and even Serena Williams when she wore a uniform styled after Cameroon’s flag in a show of support for that country’s 2002 World Cup team (“Black Americans loved it! South Africans loved it. Remember, this is a young woman who goes to Florida and [racist] people curse at her”).That rooting patterns are informed by larger issues was even evident in the 1974 battle between boxers Muhammad Ali, who had a “pan-African, anti-colonial approach,” and George Foreman, who was far less sensitive to race politics, says Carr. Both were Black and from the U.S., but at the time of their fight, it was fresh in the collective African-American memory that in 1968, Foreman had “trotted around the ring with an American flag while [African-American Olympic track athletes] Tommie Smith and John Carlos had put everything on the line for Black power … so we looked at him like, ‘This man is a clown,’ and many favored Ali,” says Carr.Carr’s message to anyone who still can’t understand how you could shout anything but “Team USA!” is, “You don’t understand how Blackness works.” My suggestion is, if you’re going to do the work of explaining that to your friends, you’ll have to start with the basics: It’s more than just fun and games.(Jenée Desmond-Harris, The Root’s associate editor of features, covers the intersection of race with news, politics and culture. She wants to talk about the complicated ways in which ethnicity, color and identity arise in your personal life – and provide perspective on the ethics and etiquette surrounding race in a changing America. Follow her on Twitter. Need race-related advice? Send your questions to racemanners@theroot.com.)last_img read more