Obese women could achieve weight loss and improvements in health with intermittent

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 8 2019Research carried out at the University of Adelaide shows that obese women lost more weight and improved their health by fasting intermittently while following a strictly controlled diet.The study, published in the journal Obesity, involved a sample of 88 women following carefully controlled diets over 10 weeks.”Continuously restricting their diet is the main way that obese women try to tackle their weight,” says Dr Amy Hutchison, lead author from the University of Adelaide and the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI).”Unfortunately, studies have shown that long-term adherence to a restricted diet is very challenging for people to follow, so this study looked at the impact of intermittent fasting on weight loss.Related StoriesDiet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repair”Obese women who followed a diet in which they ate 70% of their required energy intake and fasted intermittently lost the most weight.”Other women in the study who either fasted intermittently without reducing their food intake, who reduced their food intake but did not fast, or did not restrict their diet at all, were not as successful in losing weight,” says Dr Hutchison.The study also checked the effect of the different diets on the women’s health. Women who fasted intermittently as well as restricting their food improved their health more than those who only restricted their diet or only fasted intermittently.”By adhering to a strict pattern of intermittent fasting and dieting, obese women have achieved significant weight loss and improvements in their health such as decreased markers for heart disease,” says Dr Hutchison.Participants who fasted intermittently ate breakfast and then refrained from eating for 24 hours followed by 24 hours of eating. The following day they fasted again.All participants of the study were women who were overweight or obese with a Body Mass Index (BMI) in the 25-40 range and aged between 35 and 70 years. They followed a typical Australian diet consisting of 35% fat, 15% protein and 50% carbohydrate.”The most successful participants lost approximately 0.5 to 1 kg per week for each week of the study,” says Dr Hutchison.”This study is adding to evidence that intermittent fasting, at least in the short term, may provide better outcomes than daily continuous diet restriction for health and potentially for weight loss,” says Associate Professor Leonie Heilbronn from the University of Adelaide and SAHMRI.”While the study confirms that intermittent fasting is more effective than continuous diet restriction, the underlying signal for limiting people’s appetite, which could hold the key to triggering effective weight loss, requires further research.”New trials now being undertaken will examine the effectiveness of long-term fasting on both men and women. Source:https://www.adelaide.edu.au/last_img read more

Researchers take steps towards new sustainable battery alternative

first_imgCredit: CC0 Public Domain The research team, which also includes researchers from Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand in France, created the electrolyte as part of its work on aluminium batteries. The electrolyte is one of several key parts in a battery, acting as a conductor for electricity.”This electrolyte will make aluminium batteries cheaper and easier to produce,” says Professor Nann, from the School of Chemical and Physical Sciences and the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology at Victoria University of Wellington. “It is more affordable than the ionic liquids currently used in aluminium batteries, and it is also more sustainable, as our electrolyte can be made from plants.”This research is part of a wider project led by Professor Nann to create better battery alternatives. Batteries are currently made out of lithium and cobalt, but Professor Nann says problems with these materials are quickly becoming apparent.”Lithium and cobalt are potentially dangerous substances,” Professor Nann says. “Damage to batteries containing these substances can make them explode. They are also toxic, leading to several deaths every year from children swallowing these batteries. Nor are they easily recyclable, and we are running low on available sources of the raw materials. If we do not find alternate sources of lithium and cobalt, we will eventually run out of the resources we currently use to make batteries.”Aluminium is a good alternative, Professor Nann says, but the technology for creating aluminium batteries lags behind other battery technology—although it is catching up. However, aluminium is safer to use, as it is non-toxic and not at risk of exploding, is recyclable, and is the most abundant metal on Earth.”This new electrolyte is just another step towards improving aluminium battery technology and making it suitable for commercial use.”Professor Nann and his team have so far tested their electrolyte with a standard graphite-based battery, with plans to adapt the electrolyte so it can be used in batteries that use better performing materials in the future. Provided by Victoria University Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Polymer professor develops safer component for lithium batteries Citation: Researchers take steps towards new sustainable battery alternative (2018, November 15) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-sustainable-battery-alternative.html A team of researchers led by Professor Thomas Nann from Victoria University of Wellington has created a new electrolyte that could be the key to making safer and more environmentally friendly batteries.last_img read more

The Worlds Largest Iceberg Is 2 Years Old Today and Already Drifting

first_img Photo Gallery: Antarctica’s Pine Island Glacier Cracks They grow up so fast. The iceberg called A68 — currently the largest iceberg in the world, weighing about 1.1 trillion tons (1 trillion metric tons) — calved off Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf on July 12, 2017, two years ago today. What has this massive, frozen toddler been up to since it broke free? Mostly just spinning. As you can see in this awesome time-lapse footage taken over the last 18 months by the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-1 satellites, and shared today by glaciologist Adrian Luckman, the hulking glacier has been steadily spinning away from its native ice shelf, drifting north about 155 miles (250 kilometers) from where it began. According to Luckman, that’s some impressive mobility for arguably the largest free-moving object on Earth. [Images of Melt: Earth’s Vanishing Ice]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65929-worlds-largest-iceberg-drifting-toward-death.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  “At 100 miles (160 km) long by only a couple of hundred meters thick, the aspect ratio of Iceberg A68 is more like a credit card than a typically imagined iceberg,” Luckman, a professor at Swansea University in the UK, wrote on his website. “All the more surprising then, that despite grounding on the sea floor several times, Iceberg A68 remains in pretty much the same shape that it had when it calved away 2 years ago.” Alas, every step forward is a step away from home — and toward certain doom. While iceberg A68 continues to pirouette in a current called the Weddell Gyre (named for Antarctica’s Weddell Sea), it moves ever closer to the pull of the South Atlantic Ocean, where it will be gently swept northward to warmer climes. Many icebergs that find themselves on this path (part of an oceanic conveyor belt known as “iceberg alley,” according to BBC News) end up screeching to a halt near South Georgia Island, a remote British Overseas Territory about 1,000 miles (1,600 km) north of Antarctica. Icebergs of similar size to A68 have drifted for 5 years before making landfall, splitting into ever smaller chunks along the way. Other bergs drift farther north, ultimately melting near South America. While A68’s fate is largely up to the whims of the Atlantic Ocean at this point, scientists will continue monitoring the frigid tot’s progress from space as long as they can. Visually, it may not be as interesting as a square iceberg or coffin iceberg, but A68 still our iceberg — and we’ll be proud of it no matter how it dies. In Photos: Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf Through Time Iconic Photos of Earth from Space Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoairdogusa.comThe World’s Best Washable Air Purifierairdogusa.comUndoFinance101What Are The Best States To Retire In?Finance101UndoBirch Gold GroupThis IRS Tax Law is Sweeping the U.S.Birch Gold GroupUndoAnti-Snoring SolutionA Simple Fix for Snoring And Sleep ApneaAnti-Snoring SolutionUndolast_img read more