VOLUNTEER SMALL EQUIPMENT GRANTS- OPPORTUNITY FOR TOUCH

first_imgDoes your local Association or Permit run on the strength and hard work of volunteers and always need more assistance in terms of equipment? This information may just strike a chord with you. On 27 January 2005, the Minister for Family and Community Services Kay Patterson announced funding for the Volunteer Small Equipment Grants 2005 to help Australia’s volunteers to carry on with their vital work. Organisations can apply for grants of up to $3000 to buy small equipment items that support the work of volunteers by making it easier, safer and/or more enjoyable. Under the Volunteer Small Equipment Grants 2005, priority will be given to organisations that: * have relatively small operating budgets with limited funding sources and a relatively high volunteer to staff ratio; * demonstrate that their requested equipment will provide maximum benefit to all their volunteers by making their work safer, easier and/or more enjoyable; * demonstrate that the organisation’s work supports families and/or strengthens their local communities; * have requested equipment that will have maximum benefit in the local community for a small outlay; and * have not received funding under VSEG 2003 or VSEG 2004. Organisations are encouraged to complete and submit their application form online. For more information or the online application form, simply use the following link to visit the Australian Government website. For further information or to request an application form be posted to you, please phone the toll free Volunteer Small Equipment Grants 2005 Hotline on 1800 153 477. Organisations with special needs may contact the department on TTY 1800 055 001. Applications close at 5pm EDST Friday 4 March 2005. It is important to note that online applications received and postal applications post-marked after this date will not be included in the assessment process. Before completing the application form, please ensure that you have read the guidelines and that you are familiar with the purpose of the Volunteer Small Equipment Grants 2005. GRANTS OPPORTUNITY FOR TOUCH VOLUNTEERSlast_img read more

TOUCH-e-TALK ONLINE NEWSLETTER SEPTEMBER EDITION

first_imgThe September edition of ‘Touch-e-Talk’, the online newsletter has been released. It contains several feature stories on the upcoming National 18’s Championships and also the All Nations tournament, Volunteer of the Month, coaching drills and more. Please click here to view the newsletter: TOUCH-e-TALK SEPTEMBER 2005 EDITION If you would like to join the mailing list for future newsletters, please email media@austouch.com.aulast_img

10 months agoSolskjaer confident getting Man Utd players to play for him

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Solskjaer confident getting Man Utd players to play for himby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United caretaker boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is confident getting the players to play for him.Solskjaer says he’s done it all as a player and manager.He told MUTV: “I’ve had 300-400 games as a first-team manager. I’m confident. I’ve won the league, I’ve won cups, I’ve been relegated.”It’s about man management. It’s about managing players, staff and it’s about getting the best out of everyone.”The boss [Sir Alex Ferguson] will always be the best at that. I get my managerial style from him. He’s been the biggest influence but then again we’re different. I’m a different personality.”I like to speak to people, I like to engange with people, I want to see people express themselves. That makes me happy.”On assistant manager Mike Phelan, he added: “That (appointing him) was the first thing I thought about. I’m young, Kieran and Michael are young.”I rang him and he was at a coaching course in Burnley when I rang him. He’s an incredible calming influence. His football knowledge is really really good.” last_img read more

18 days agoCrystal Palace plan new January move for Chelsea striker Batshuayi

first_imgCrystal Palace plan new January move for Chelsea striker Batshuayiby Paul Vegas18 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveCrystal Palace are planning a new move for Chelsea striker Michy Batshuayi in January.Palace, who are currently sixth in the Premier League, plan to bolster their attack when the transfer window reopens and have made Chelsea striker Batshuayi a leading target, says the Daily Mail.The 26 year-old spent the second half of last season on loan at Selhurst Park and was a popular figure, scoring six times in 11 starts and 13 appearances in total.Palace hope Chelsea could be persuaded to part with Batshuayi due to Tammy Abraham’s emergence, along with the presence of Olivier Giroud in Frank Lampard’s squad, and also the Belgian’s contract situation.Batshuayi signed a five-year deal when he joined Chelsea, who beat Palace to his signature, from Marseille in 2016 for £33m. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Video: Two Kentucky Fans Recorded “Big Blue Train,” A Bluegrass Ode To The Undefeated Wildcats

first_imgKentucky fans play bluegrass song about Wildcats.When you’re undefeated and dominating the competition like No. 1 Kentucky is, you’re bound to inspire passionate fans to drum up unique ways to express their love and appreciation. What better way for two fans to show their devotion to UK basketball than with a little Bluegrass tribute?That’s what the Jenkins twins decided to do. They recorded a musical ode to their beloved Wildcats, complete with shout outs of every key player, and jokes about Roy Williams, Rick Pitino and Bill Self drinking vodka. The chorus of the song features the line “We’re going to ‘Nap town on this Big Blue Train.” It’s a reference to Indianapolis, or ‘Nap Town, where the 2015 Final Four will be held.All in all, it’s entertaining in a quirky and hilarious way. [H/T : @KySportsRadio ]last_img read more

Exclusive London and Prague famil a delight for Personal Travel Manage

first_imgSource = TravelManagers Australia Click Here to join TravelManagers Exclusive London and Prague famil a delight for Personal Travel ManagerThe city of Prague has long enjoyed a reputation as one of the most beautiful and atmospheric cities in Europe, with centuries of history layered together to create an effect that personal travel manager Janice Lee found to be quite addictive on her recent famil.Lee, who is TravelManagers’ representative for Surry Hills in Sydney, spent three nights soaking up the historic city’s sights on a luxury famil organised exclusively for CT Partners members and hosted by British Airways and the Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group.TravelManagers qualified for a place on the famil as one of CT Partners’ top three British Airways-selling members.  Lee herself was selected by TravelManagers’ to take part in the famil on the basis of her British Airways sales during this period.TravelManagers’ Executive General Manager, Michael Gazal, says the company are always supportive of personal travel managers (PTMs) taking part in such famils.“We encourage any opportunity for our PTMs to experience new destinations for themselves as we know that first-hand experience leads to better service for clients and increased sales.”Prior to her arrival in Prague, Lee and her group were also treated to three nights at the Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park in London, providing them with the perfect base from which to get in touch (or, as in Lee’s case, back in touch) with its sights.“I haven’t been to London for several years so really enjoyed getting reacquainted with the feel and vibrancy of London,” says Lee.  “The Mandarin Oriental is in a wonderful location over the road from Hyde Park and it gives you a great feeling of being a local as there are lots of apartments and inner city living, with easy access to the fantastic public transport system.”For Lee, one of the highlights of the London leg of the famil was opportunity to dine at the hotel’s “Dinner by Heston Blumenthal” restaurant.“It was such a unique experience; there was always an air of expectancy when each course arrived.  The general consensus was that the pâté (which looked like a Mandarin) was the highlight of the meal.”The famil was also an opportunity to experience British Airways A380 business class product between Singapore and London.“We really enjoyed the A380 and Club World experience, especially as it meant we arrived in London fresh and ready to cope with a new day.  We were also really impressed by the wonderful arrivals lounge at Heathrow where business clients can shower and breakfast before heading off to meetings.”At the end of the group’s time in London, they were whisked off to Heathrow where they saw first-hand the significant amount of construction work taking place, before boarding another British Airways flight for the two-hour journey to Prague.“Prague is one of the most beautiful cities I have visited and far exceeded my expectations.  It’s a fantastic walking city, although the cobblestones make for hard going unless you have decent walking shoes,” she says.Lee and her group spent three nights at the stunning Mandarin Oriental Prague.“The hotel, which was previously a monastery, has a lovely charm and boasts an amazing Spa which we all had the opportunity to experience.  I can honestly say it was one of the best I have been to recently.”For Lee, their two half-day walking tours were a highlight of her time in Prague.  Led by an 82-year-old local woman, they were an opportunity not just to walk around the sights but also to gain a personal insight into the changes the city has seen during and after the war.“It was my first famil with TravelManagers, so I was very excited to find I had won a spot on such a luxurious trip,” says Lee.  “Since my first trip overseas in 1977, I’ve been continually amazed and intrigued by the unique sights, sounds and tastes of different countries, customs and cuisines, but this was definitely a high point.  All in all, it was a wonderful experience and I learnt so much.”For more information or to speak to someone confidentially about TravelManagers please contact Suzanne Laister on 1800 019 599last_img read more

Since I was thinking about bond yields I called D

first_img Since I was thinking about bond yields, I called Dr. Lacy Hunt (one of the more brilliant economists in the country, and not just in my opinion). He has been forecasting interest rates for a long time and been the guiding light at Hoisington Asset Management, which has established perhaps the best track record I know of on bond returns. They have been long bonds for quite some time, which has been the correct position, if a difficult and lonely one. Most bond managers think rates are set to rise. Not Lacy. He thinks we will get close to 2% on the 30-year bond and has said so for decades. Dr. Gary Shilling wrote his first book in 1998, called simply Deflation, and followed it up recently with another great work, titled The Age of Deleveraging. He first went long bonds in 1982, which has been one of the great trades of the last 30 years. He lists a whole host of reasons for a deflationary period over the next few years. The “Muddle-Through” economy is deflationary The argument for deflation is rather straightforward. The boom in the US and much of the world from 1982 until 2008 was partially the result of financial innovations and massive leveraging. That process has come to an end, and the private sector is deleveraging and will do so even further as the economy softens and we slip into the next recession. Governments are approaching the end of their ability to borrow money at reasonable rates in Europe, and soon in Japan, and eventually in the US (and that time is not as far off as we would like). I described the whole process in my book Endgame. Assuming the US government deals with its coming deficit crisis in a realistic manner, the results will be deflationary – a big assumption, I grant you! The next big deflationary force is the slowing of the velocity of money. Very simply, money velocity is the rate at which money moves through the economy from one transaction to another and is a good barometer of economic vitality. It has been falling for five years, pretty much as I wrote it would back in 2006. We are now close to the historical average velocity of money; but, since velocity is mean-reverting, it will continue to fall until it bottoms well below the historical average. This cycle takes years, not months, by the way. A slow-growth, muddle-through economy is deflationary. High and persistent unemployment is deflationary. Absent some new piece of data that I just don’t see right now, rates in the US are going lower and are going to stay low for longer than any of us can afford to bet against them. I think the Fed will respond if the government does finally act in a fiscally responsible manner (which would be inherently deflationary), by fighting that deflation with the only tool it has left: the outright monetization of debt. They will call it something else, of course, but that will not alter the bottom line: the money presses will run day and night. They will be able to monetize more debt than you can shake a stick at, and do so without causing a repeat of the 1970s Great Inflation. Yes, it will eventually catch up with us – there is no free lunch – but they are betting on keeping the lid on actual price inflation by raising rates and cutting back on the money supply. We are some years away from that, but we had better listen when The Inflationator says, “I’ll be back.” Anybody who says they know the timing is a lot more confident in their crystal ball than I am. But I think I can see out a year or so, and it looks like continued low rates and deflation. By the way, just to appease the gold bugs out there, given my deflationary call, I will note that quality gold stocks were up hugely during the deflationary Great Depression of the 1930s. Even with the dollar on the gold standard. Just saying. A Quadrillion Here, A Quadrillion There And speaking of more money than we can imagine, and the wholesale monetization of government debt, I’d like to close with an instructive vignette from the Land of the Rising Yen. You may remember Everett Dirksen, the Republican Senator from Illinois who, back in the 1960s, was credited with saying, “A billion here, a billion there, and pretty soon you are talking about real money.” Thorough research fails to confirm that he actually used that line, although one reporter claims he asked Dirksen about it and received the reply, “Oh, I never said that. A newspaper fella misquoted me once, and I thought it sounded so good that I never bothered to deny it.” But that quote has lodged in our collective memory; whether or not he said it, it does make a salient point. Today we have become rather casual in our use of the word trillion. “A trillion dollars” slips so easily from the tongue, but it’s just too big a number for most of us to even fathom. Estimates of the total stars in our galaxy run between 100 and 400 billion. A trillion barrels of oil would fuel the world for over 30 years. One trillion seconds is almost 32,000 years. The mind boggles. Yet today we think almost nothing of adding a trillion dollars every year to the already bloated US debt! In fact, economists like Paul Krugman fume that we are not adding more trillions to the debt each year, as if debt carried no consequences. By this thinking, Greece should not be forced to suffer any austerity because it has taken on too much debt. Rather, other nations should be taxed to give Greece the money that will enable them to go even deeper into debt – debt that it cannot and most likely will not repay! So, I must admit that when I came across this next item, it gave me pause. We turn now to a report published by Bloomberg and authored by my friend Dr. Gary Shilling, talking about the massive debt that has been accumulated by Japan. Gary argues that Japan is reaching a critical point where its debt cannot be financed except by extreme monetization by its central bank, because turning to world markets to sell the debt will drive up interest rates to unsustainable levels. I have made similar arguments. Says Gary: “As Japan’s government debt of 1,085 trillion yen matures over time, it will be subject to … higher refinancing rates. The average maturity of Japanese government debt is six years and 11 months. Yet 17 percent of that debt matures this year, 52 percent in the next five years and 76 percent in the next decade. Markets anticipate, so Japanese bonds throughout the spectrum will probably plummet in price and leap in yield at the first sign of a current- account deficit, maybe even before.” One thousand trillion yen. That’s 32,000,000 years’ worth of seconds. Yes, I know the yen has two extra zeros in relation to the dollar, but we are talking about one quadrillion yen. Are we really ready for the word quadrillion to enter the lexicon in what is supposed to be the developed world? In the case of Japan, we are apparently already there. A hundred years ago, a deficit of US$1 billion would have been unthinkable. We actually had balanced budgets during most of our first 200 years, except during wars and economic crashes. And now we talk trillions, albeit in the wake of inflation that has made the word trillion less than it was 100 years ago. Will our grandchildren in the latter half of this century talk quadrillions? Or quintillions? Is that even thinkable? Let’s just hope the word quadrillion doesn’t come into common parlance any time soon. This article is a reprint from the World Money Analyst. [John Mauldin is a highly sought-after contributor to major financial publications including The Financial Times, The Daily Reckoning, as well as a regular guest on CNBC, Yahoo Tech Ticker, and Bloomberg TV. He also contributes to World Money Analyst – a service that regularly provides up to date coverage on issues and opportunities for international investors. Click here to learn more about our 100% risk-free test drive – including three highly actionable special briefings designed to get you started on the right foot right away – but only available for a limited time.] John Mauldin, International Man I am frequently asked in meetings or after a speech whether I think we will have inflation or deflation. “Yes,” I readily reply, trying hard not to smirk, as the questioner tries to digest the answer. And while my answer is flippant, it’s also the truth, as I do expect both outcomes. Following the obligatory chuckle from the rest of the group comes a follow-up request for a few more specifics. And they are that I expect we will first see deflation and then inflation, but the key is the timing. Recessions are by definition deflationary. Deleveraging events are also deflationary. A recession accompanied by deleveraging is deflationary in spades. That is why central banks worldwide have been able to print money in amounts that in prior periods would have sent inflation spiraling out of control. This drives gold bugs nuts, but they are not factoring in the velocity of money. If velocity were flat, inflation would be quite significant by now. But velocity has been falling and is going to fall further. The US Fed and the ECB are going to be able to print more money than we can imagine without stoking inflation … at least for a while. One of the longtime champions of the deflationary outlook has been my friend David Rosenberg (formerly chief economist at Merrill and now with Gluskin Sheff in Toronto). He has been talking for years about a target of 1.5% for the 10-year US bond. Today, as I’m writing this, we got down to 1.5% and did not even pause, ending the day at 1.47%. I will also note that I spoke with Rich Yamarone, the chief economist at Bloomberg, and he said he believes we will scare 50 basis points (the 10-year T-bill hits 0.50%) before we are through. To which Rosenberg replied in a later conversation, “He’s nuts!” Look at this table of 10-year bond yields:last_img read more

Furious disabled campaigners have attacked MPs o

first_img“Furious” disabled campaigners have attacked MPs on a Commons committee for refusing to ask the minister for disabled people about figures showing attempted suicides among people claiming out-of-work disability benefits doubled between 2007 and 2014.The new figures, showing how suicide attempts rocketed after the introduction of the work capability assessment (WCA), emerged last week and were passed to the Commons select committee on work and pensions, as well as at least one member of the committee, Labour’s Neil Coyle, in advance of yesterday’s evidence session with Sarah Newton.The session was part of the committee’s inquiry into the government’s assessments for personal independence payment (PIP) and employment and support allowance (ESA).Activists yesterday expressed their anger at the committee’s failure to ask Newton about the figures.One said it was “disgraceful”, another said she was “furious”, while a third prominent campaigner said she was “stunned”.A leading mental health campaigner said the failure was “a dereliction of duty by the whole committee”.The new analysis of NHS statistics, prepared by the independent social research institute NatCen and published by Disability News Service (DNS) for the first time last week, shows that in 2007 – a year before the introduction of the much-criticised WCA – 21 per cent of incapacity benefit (IB) claimants told researchers they had attempted suicide at some point in their lives.The following year, IB began to be replaced by ESA, with eligibility tested by the WCA, under the New Labour government.But by 2014, following six years of the WCA – and four years of social security reforms under the new coalition government, and austerity-related cuts to disability benefits and services – more than 43 per cent of claimants were saying they had attempted suicide.Over the same period, the proportion of adults questioned for the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (APMS) who were not claiming IB (in 2007) or ESA (in 2014) and had attempted to take their own lives remained statistically stable (6.0 per cent in 2007 against 6.7 per cent in 2014).The figures strongly suggest that government cuts and reforms, and particularly the introduction of the WCA, have had a serious, detrimental – and sometimes fatal – effect on the mental health of a generation of claimants of out-of-work disability benefits.After learning that the minister would be questioned this week, DNS and at least one other campaigner had passed on this research to the committee, which is chaired by Labour MP Frank Field.After DNS drew Coyle’s attention to the figures, five days before the hearing, he said: “I’m sure it will be raised.”A committee spokeswoman also agreed, the same day, to forward the information to “the specialists developing the briefing for the session”.Yesterday, the committee spokeswoman refused to comment on the failure to ask the minister about the figures.Coyle had also failed by noon today (Thursday) to respond to messages left with him and his office.Denise McKenna, co-founder of the Mental Health Resistance Network, said: “Any MP who remains silent about this rise in self-harm and suicidal ideation should be held to account.“The failure of the committee to mention these figures constitutes a dereliction of duty by the whole committee.“These figures should have been the first item on their agenda and we can barely believe that they weren’t even mentioned.”    She added: “We are only too well aware of why Tory committee members would want to suppress these figures, but it seems extraordinary that Labour MPs are repeatedly missing opportunities to flag up the appalling effects of welfare reform, and this begs the question of why they are choosing to do so.“It may be that they feel implicated in the carnage that is currently being visited upon disabled people, since it was Labour who introduced the WCA, or it may be that some in the Parliamentary Labour Party actually agree with the brutality of the benefits system.“We had been hoping that under the present Labour leadership our best interests would be promoted but this doesn’t seem to be what is happening.“If disabled people are to support Labour wholeheartedly, they need to improve their support for us.“While we can berate the Labour party for helping to suppress these appalling figures, we don’t want to forget the cruelty of Tory MPs who are pressing forward with reforms that they know are driving people to suicide.”Linda Burnip, a co-founder of Disabled People Against Cuts, said: “It is disgraceful that members of the work and pensions committee have failed to ask the minister about the horrendous increase in attempted suicides when they had such a good opportunity to do so.“They have totally failed disabled people by this blatant omission and it is clear to see that Heidi Allen’s tears [the Tory committee member was reported to have cried in the Commons chamber after Field described the impact of universal credit on his constituents] didn’t last long and that Neil Coyle’s concerns are very limited.”John McArdle, co-founder of the Black Triangle campaign, said: “We are all bitterly disappointed that the NHS NatCen suicide figures were not raised in parliament today by the work and pensions committee.“The abject failure to speak out on the issue of the shocking increase in the rate of suicide and self-harm among our disabled community leads us to one conclusion: that there exists a conspiracy of silence between the Labour and Conservative parties on this, the gravest and most scandalous of issues. “Disabled people and the families and friends of those who have either died or attempted to take their own lives by their own hand as a direct consequence of being put through the WCA disability assessment regime will today be asking themselves why the committee are not holding the government to account.”Mo Stewart, who spent years researching the “totally bogus” WCA for her book Cash Not Care: The Planned Demolition Of The UK Welfare State, said: “I was stunned to learn that the disturbing evidence of the reported 43 per cent of attempted suicides of ESA claimants was not raised at committee.“This detailed detrimental impact of the ESA claims process on public mental health makes the minister’s evidence to the committee even more suspect, as she attempted to insist that the assessors were professional and empathetic to the claimants; a claim that was challenged by members of the committee.”Dr Jay Watts, a consultant clinical psychologist and member of the campaigning Alliance for Counselling and Psychotherapy, who first brought the 2014 figures to the attention of DNS, said: “One wonders about the committee’s purpose if not to call the government to account, and listen to such clear, robust and indisputable evidence.“I am furious, frankly, that this question remained unasked, leaving claimants in desperate straits over Christmas, no doubt reading articles that claim this is the year the country began to take mental health seriously.”She added: “How is it possible that the minister for disabled people was not asked about the doubling of attempted suicide rates so clearly linked to the policies of her department?“How was she not asked to justify government policies in the wake of the thousands who have died as a result of the brutality of the ESA system?“What greater priority could there be than immediate reform to stop the misery, despair and impoverishment which is leading so many disabled people to die by suicide?”Last week, Watts said the figures showed “the greatest increase in suicide rates for any population that I can recall in the literature”, and pointed out that they were taken from “the largest, most reliable data set on the mental health of the nation out there”.last_img read more

Elon Musk Is Sending Teams to Assist With the Thailand Cave Rescue

first_img Elon Musk Is Sending Teams to Assist With the Thailand Cave Rescue This story originally appeared on Engadget Add to Queue It’s hoped his resources could save the boys from months spent underground. Elon Musk Rachel England Image credit: Peter Parks | Getty Images via engadget Next Article Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Writer July 6, 2018 2 min read Guest Writer Elon Musk has offered assistance in the rescue of the boys’ soccer team trapped in a cave in Thailand. Engineers from SpaceX and The Boring Company will travel to the country on Saturday to help with what is becoming an increasingly perilous rescue effort. As CNN reports, conditions are becoming life-threatening, with a former navy diver involved in the operation losing his life after a sudden drop in oxygen levels underground.According to Musk, technicians may be able to utilize a Tesla-made battery pack to increase the pump rate of water out of the cave. He also discussed the possibility of inserting a nylon tube into the cave to fill it with air, “like a bouncy castle.” In a tweet, he said he was “happy to help if there is a way to do so.”SpaceX & Boring Co engineers headed to Thailand tomorrow to see if we can be helpful to govt. There are probably many complexities that are hard to appreciate without being there in person.— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) July 6, 2018The 12 boys and their soccer coach were discovered safe and well after nine days spent trapped in the caves due to rising water levels. But it’s now feared they could spend months underground, as heavy rainfall is expected to contribute to further flooding. Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals –shares Register Now »last_img read more

Pilot Growth Closes FullyInvested 45 Million Fund II

first_imgFirm’s Proprietary AI Platform, “NavPod,” Sources Bootstrapped, Artificial Intelligence and Enterprise SAAS CompaniesPilot Growth Management LLC, a technology-focused growth equity firm, announced the full deployment and final closing of Pilot Growth Equity Fund II, LP (“PGE II”). The total amount of new capital in PGE II is $45 million. Pilot Growth received repeat commitments from institutional anchor limited partners in the first fund and attracted interest from many family offices.Pilot Growth, a technology-focused private equity firm, announced the final closing of its fully deployed $45 million Pilot Growth Equity Fund IIPilot Growth, which manages over $200 million of growth stage capital including exits, counts several category-leading software companies among those in its portfolio, including CB Insights, r4 Technologies, Bizzabo and Tailwind.“We are gratified by the steadfast support from our limited partners; they believe in our team, our portfolio and our investment approach,” stated Neil Callahan, co-founder and managing partner of Pilot Growth.Marketing Technology News: Teleperformance Groups ‘Praxidia Knowledge Services’ partners with CallMiner to launch TP Interact – a Comprehensive Interaction Analytics SolutionPaul Breitenbach, the Founder & CEO of r4, a cross-enterprise AI company, and former co-founder of Priceline said, “I am excited to be partnering with Pilot Growth. Not only do they invest and help grow market leading AI companies, but they are also a pioneering practitioner of AI with their home grown NavPod platform. NavPod helps Pilot source growth stage market leading software companies like r4.”“NavPod is a tireless team member who gets smarter every day as she sources and ranks potential investments for us. Of the 10 portfolio companies in our two funds, 80 percent were initially sourced and validated by NavPod, which enabled our senior team to contact the entrepreneurs at exactly the right time,” said William Lee, Pilot Growth co-founder and managing director. “The team exited Zenedge, a NavPod deal, via a sale to Oracle in 2018, validating NavPod’s contribution to the strategy’s long-term success.”Marketing Technology News: Cint Appoints SVP of Asia Nicholas Antram to Continue Strategic Expansion Across the RegionA cornerstone of the Pilot Growth’s team strategy is applying their own entrepreneurial experience and senior business development advisors to help their portfolio companies grow faster. “We are excited to partner with entrepreneurs and management teams to help them rapidly expand their innovative platforms into larger companies with loyal customer bases,” said Rob Walker, co-founder and managing director of Pilot Growth.Marketing Technology News: True Influence Hires Data Strategist and Marketing Technology Visionary Ray Estevez as Chief Data Officer Pilot Growth Closes Fully-Invested $45 Million Fund II PRNewswireMay 29, 2019, 5:03 pmMay 29, 2019 CB InsightsfundingGrowth Equity Fund IIMarketing TechnologyNeil CallahanNewsPilot Growth Managementr4 Technologies Previous ArticleCINDE Announces: NTT Data Launches Salesforce Center of Excellence in Costa RicaNext ArticleB2B Marketers Catching Up with Consumer Marketers in Customer Data Platform Deploymentlast_img read more

Researchers explore role of dietary composition on energy expenditure

first_img Source:http://www.bmj.com/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 14 2018The researchers say this effect may improve the success of obesity treatment, especially among people with high insulin secretion (insulin level 30 minutes after consuming a standard amount of glucose).It is well known that energy expenditure declines with weight loss, as the body adapts by slowing metabolism and burning fewer calories, often resulting in weight regain. But little is known about how dietary composition influences this adaptive response over the long term.One theory (known as the carbohydrate-insulin model) is that recent increases in the consumption of processed, high glycemic load foods trigger hormonal changes that increase hunger and make people more likely to gain weight.To better understand the role of dietary composition on energy expenditure, researchers led by Cara Ebbeling and David Ludwig at Boston Children’s Hospital set out to compare the effects of diets varying in carbohydrate to fat ratio on energy expenditure over a 20-week period.The trial involved 234 overweight adults aged 18 to 65 years with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or higher who took part in an initial weight loss diet for about 10 weeks.Of these, 164 achieved the target weight loss of around 10% of body weight and were then randomly assigned to follow either a high (60%), moderate (40%), or low (20%) carbohydrate diet for 20 weeks.Each participant was provided with fully prepared meals with a similar protein and fat content. The researchers then tracked participants’ weight and measured energy expenditure to compare how the different groups burned calories at the same weight.After adjusting for potentially influential factors, they found that over the 20 weeks, total energy expenditure was significantly greater in participants on the low carbohydrate diet compared with the high carbohydrate diet.Related StoriesIntermittent fasting may regulate blood glucose levels even without weight lossGrowth hormone acts directly on the brain to conserve energy when the body loses weightIntense weight loss with the soups and shakes could reverse type 2 diabetesParticipants on the low carbohydrate diet burned 209 to 278 kilocalories a day more than those on the high carbohydrate diet – or about 50 to 70 kilocalories a day increase for every 10% decrease in the contribution of carbohydrate to total energy intake.In those with the highest insulin secretion at the start of the study, the difference in total energy expenditure between the low and high carbohydrate diets was even greater – up to 478 kilocalories a day, consistent with the carbohydrate-insulin model.If this effect persisted “it would translate into an estimated 10 kg weight loss after three years, assuming no change in calorie intake,” write the authors.Hormones involved in energy balance (ghrelin and leptin) changed in a potentially advantageous manner in participants assigned to the low carbohydrate diet compared with those assigned to the high carbohydrate diet.The authors point to some study limitations and cannot rule out the possibility that some of the observed effects may be due to other unmeasured factors. Nevertheless, they say this large trial shows that dietary composition seems to affect energy expenditure independently of body weight.”A low glycemic load, high fat diet might facilitate weight loss maintenance beyond the conventional focus on restricting energy intake and encouraging physical activity,” they conclude. And they call for additional research to explore these effects further and develop appropriate behavioral and environmental interventions for translation to public health.last_img read more

Novel nanowire memristor to artificially reproduce functions of biological synapses

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 10 2018Emulating and understanding the human brain is one of the most important challenges for modern technology: on the one hand, the ability to artificially reproduce the processing of brain signals is one of the cornerstones for the development of artificial intelligence, while on the other the understanding of the cognitive processes at the base of the human mind is still far away.And the research published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications by Gianluca Milano and Carlo Ricciardi, PhD student and professor, respectively, of the Applied Science and Technology Department of the Politecnico di Torino, represents a step forward in these directions. In fact, the study entitled “Self-limited single nanowire systems combining all-in-one memristive and neuromorphic functionalities” shows how it is possible to artificially emulate the activity of synapses, i.e. the connections between neurons that regulate the learning processes in our brain, in a single “nanowire” with a diameter thousands of times smaller than that of a hair.Related StoriesNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryPosterior parietal cortex plays crucial role in making decisions, research showsMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsIt is a crystalline nanowire that takes the “memristor”, the electronic device able to artificially reproduce the functions of biological synapses, to a more performing level. Thanks to the use of nanotechnologies, which allow the manipulation of matter at the atomic level, it was for the first time possible to combine into one single device the synaptic functions that were individually emulated through specific devices. For this reason, the nanowire allows an extreme miniaturization of the “memristor”, significantly reducing the complexity and energy consumption of the electronic circuits necessary for the implementation of learning algorithms.Starting from the theorization of the “memristor” in 1971 by Prof. Leon Chua – now visiting professor at the Politecnico di Torino, who was conferred an honorary degree by the University in 2015 – this new technology will not only allow smaller and more performing devices to be created for the implementation of increasingly “intelligent” computers, but is also a significant step forward for the emulation and understanding of the functioning of the brain.”The nanowire memristor – said Carlo Ricciardi – represents a model system for the study of physical and electrochemical phenomena that govern biological synapses at the nanoscale. The work is the result of the collaboration between our research team and the RWTH University of Aachen in Germany, supported by INRiM, the National Institute of Metrological Research, and IIT, the Italian Institute of Technology.” Source: https://www.polito.it/?lang=enlast_img read more

Researchers take steps towards new sustainable battery alternative

first_imgCredit: CC0 Public Domain The research team, which also includes researchers from Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand in France, created the electrolyte as part of its work on aluminium batteries. The electrolyte is one of several key parts in a battery, acting as a conductor for electricity.”This electrolyte will make aluminium batteries cheaper and easier to produce,” says Professor Nann, from the School of Chemical and Physical Sciences and the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology at Victoria University of Wellington. “It is more affordable than the ionic liquids currently used in aluminium batteries, and it is also more sustainable, as our electrolyte can be made from plants.”This research is part of a wider project led by Professor Nann to create better battery alternatives. Batteries are currently made out of lithium and cobalt, but Professor Nann says problems with these materials are quickly becoming apparent.”Lithium and cobalt are potentially dangerous substances,” Professor Nann says. “Damage to batteries containing these substances can make them explode. They are also toxic, leading to several deaths every year from children swallowing these batteries. Nor are they easily recyclable, and we are running low on available sources of the raw materials. If we do not find alternate sources of lithium and cobalt, we will eventually run out of the resources we currently use to make batteries.”Aluminium is a good alternative, Professor Nann says, but the technology for creating aluminium batteries lags behind other battery technology—although it is catching up. However, aluminium is safer to use, as it is non-toxic and not at risk of exploding, is recyclable, and is the most abundant metal on Earth.”This new electrolyte is just another step towards improving aluminium battery technology and making it suitable for commercial use.”Professor Nann and his team have so far tested their electrolyte with a standard graphite-based battery, with plans to adapt the electrolyte so it can be used in batteries that use better performing materials in the future. Provided by Victoria University Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Polymer professor develops safer component for lithium batteries Citation: Researchers take steps towards new sustainable battery alternative (2018, November 15) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-sustainable-battery-alternative.html A team of researchers led by Professor Thomas Nann from Victoria University of Wellington has created a new electrolyte that could be the key to making safer and more environmentally friendly batteries.last_img read more