Jamaica claim hurdles, sprint relay records at Carifta Games

first_img Countrywoman Jamaica’s Shannon Kallawan broke a 13-year-old mark, while Shian Salmon and the boys’ Under-18 4×100 metres relay team of Michael Stephens, Christopher Taylor, Jhevaughn Matherson, and Dejour Russell were in record-breaking form at the 45th Carifta Games in St George’s, Grenada, yesterday. Jamaica ended at the national Athletics Stadium on the penultimate day with 52 medals – 24 gold, 17 silver, and 11 bronze. Kallawan took the girls’ Under-20 400 metres hurdles in 56.21 seconds, erasing the 56.61 done by Jamaica’s Camille Robinson in 2003. Lakeisha Warner of the British Virgin Island (BVI) finished second in 58.14, while Jamaica’s Nicolee Foster took bronze in 58.34. Jamaica swept the sprint relays, garnished with a record run of 40.40 seconds in the Under-18 boys’ event. Salmon won her second gold medal with a record run in the girls 400m hurdles. Secured a quinella After winning the Under-18 high jump on Saturday, Salmon got the better of teammate Sanique Walker, winning in 59.50 seconds to break the one- year record of 59.55 seconds done by countrywoman Junelle Bromfield in St Kitts. Walker, who finished second a year ago, again copped silver in 59.60 seconds. Gabrielle Gibson of Bahamas finished third in 1:01.16. The quartet of Dazgay Freeman, Shaniel English, Michae Harriott, and Kimone Shaw won the girls’ Under-18 4×100 metres in 45.87 seconds ahead of Bahamas, 46.37, and Trinidad and Tobago, 47.27. The star-studded boys’ team erased the 40.52-second record set by Jamaica last year. The Under-20 girls’ quartet of Kimone Hinds, Patrice Moody, Shanice Reid, and Rushelle Burton won in 44.36, while the boys – Rohan Cole, Nigel Ellis, Raheem Chambers, and Akeem Bloomfield – clocked 39.74 seconds. Bahamas were second in 40.27 seconds, with Barbados third in 40.97. It was three out of four for Jamaica in the Intermediate hurdle events. Timor Barrett, 51.79, stole the spotlight from teammate Jauvaney James, 52.07, in the Under-20 boys event. Barbados Rivaldo Leacock was third in 53.56. Barbados, however, took gold and silver in the Under-18 boys’ event through Rasheema Griffiths (52.22) and Nathan Ferguson (53.36). Jamaica’s Dashinelle Dyer was third in 54.05 seconds. In the girl’s Open 3000 metres, Jamaica’s Britnie dixon (10:57.05) and Monifa Green secured a quinella. Elizabeth Williams of Barbados won bronze. Jamaica also picked up gold in the final individual track event of the day, the boys’ Under-18 3000 metres as defending champion Keenan Lawrence outwitted Dominic Dyer out of The Cayman Islands to win in 9:05.71. Dyer was second in 9:06.33, with third going to Kallique St Jean of Antigua and Barbuda in 9:11.49. In the field events, Zico Campbell took the boys’ Under-18 shot put gold with 17.75 metres, erasing the old mark of 17.56m set in 2015 by Isaiah Taylor of Trinidad and Tobago. Campbell’s teammate, Rasheda Downer, captured silver with 17.57m, as Barbados’ Triston Gibbons took bronze with 16.64m. In the morning session, Jamaica’s Aiko Jones won the Under-18 girls’ discus gold medal with a throw of 46.49m to go along with the bronze in the shot put on Saturday’s opening day. Jamaica won gold and bronze in the girls’ Under-18 long jump as Vere Technical’s Britany Anderson (6.02m) won and Annia Ashley finished third with 5.91m. Guyana’s Chantoba Bright (5.94m) won silver. In the girls’ Open heptathlon, Junelle Fullerton won gold for Jamaica after amassing 4,597 points. Her teammate, Zinadine Russell (4,524), won silver. In the Under-20 200m preliminaries, Jamaica’s Ellis and Reid were disqualified from the boys’ and girls’ events for false-starting.last_img read more

Tips from Pixar: Maintaining Creativity Over The Long Haul

first_imgAbout to embark on an ambitious project? Learn a few lessons from Pixar on helping your creativity go the distance.Pixar films, like most animated film, can take years to make. In fact, from start to finish they can take upwards of 4-7 years to complete, although the animated production may only last for about 6-8 intensive months. So how do Pixar’s world renown storytellers maintain their creative juices over such a long haul? Here are a few insights into how they achieve such a feat, and how you can too. Meticulous MethodThe process of creating an animated film gives rise to some of the essential structure that helps to refine and maintain creative quality throughout the whole endeavor. Many years of preparation go into the story, structure and pacing of the film, well before any expensive, time-consuming and technically challenging computer generated 3D animation is attempted. As Abraham Lincoln once said “Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.” So it is with Pixar’s films and so it should be with any project.Getting your project right on paper, creating fast iterations of inexpensive mockups and repeatedly testing and improving them is a great discipline for any creative.This Disney blog takes you through each department’s involvement in creating Monster University from scratch, providing a simple overview of the whole process from story to final rendering. If you’re about to start creating your own animated masterpiece then you should definitely check out Pixar’s behind the scenes videos which provide plenty of insights into their creative process from all sorts of artistic and managerial perspectives.Though not a Pixar film, as a bonus check out this short explanation of how to create an animated feature film from Steve Carell of Despicable Me 1&2 fame.Building DesignOne of the less obvious elements of Pixar’s immense creativity reserves is the strategic design of it’s studio space. What’s most often picked up on in behind the scenes videos at Pixar, is the way in which each animator can customise their own little cubicle space in anyway they wish.  However what’s more important to generating creativity is the spaces in between those cubicles. In this insightful post from The 99 Percent they review how creative companies like Pixar and Google have maximised the possibility of serendipitous interactions on stairways, hallways and eating spots through smart and intentional building design.“If a building doesn’t encourage [collaboration], you’ll lose a lot of innovation and the magic that’s sparked by serendipity. So we designed the building to make people get out of their offices and mingle in the central atrium with people they might not otherwise see.” – Steve JobsAlthough you might not be able to re-design your creative space to such an opulent degree, open plan work spaces allow people to stop by a desk for a chat, mingle with people from other teams and see what others are up to. Encouraging communal dining is also another a great way to both foster community and creativity.LeadershipEd Catmull has been near or at the top of Pixar animation studios since the beginning and in this interview with Martin Giles from the Economist he shares some of his leadership insights and reveals some of the internal working methods of Pixar. It’s a fascinating discussion and well worth a watch, largely because it demonstrates how much leadership is necessary to any successful creative endeavor. Leaders must develop a culture that promotes creativity on every level.I do believe you want a vision, so you start off with a person who has a vision for a story. And we do things to try and protect that vision and its not easy to protect it, because they feel these pressures. They also have misconceptions about the creative process sometimes. We do have these people who we give a chance to on the belief they’re right, and can rise to the occasion, and we are wrong sometimes, because we can’t see what goes on in their heads. And our measure, because we can’t see inside people’s heads, is the team. If the team is functioning well, and healthy, it will solve the problem.last_img read more

After Effects Tutorial: 3D Mosaic Effect

first_imgFull Video Tutorial Transcript[color-box color=”gray”]EVAN ABRAMS: In this After Effects tutorial from Premiumbeat.com we’re going to create a 3D mosaic break-apart and come together of a logo, or really anything. It’s going to be using the card dance plug-in and a couple of other things to shore it up, so let’s get into it. So inside of After Effects the first thing we’re going to do is create a new composition, and in this case we’re going to use the HDTV 1080 24 frames per second preset, and we’ll set the duration to 30 seconds even though we won’t use all of it.Now, the first thing we need to do is create a place holder for the logos or the elements that you’re going to break apart using the mosaic effect. For this case we’ll just make a new text layer and we’ll just type in logo. And we’re going to use sort of a gold-brown color, and we’ll shrink it down so that it fits more or less towards the center and we can use the align panel to put it right in the middle.Now on the logo we might dress this up with a drop shadow, just to give it a bit more visual interest. So we’ll give it a white drop shadow, set it’s opacity to 100, put up the distance above 15, and then we’ll also go into the character palette here and we’ll add a stroke to it. So this will serve as the logo for the piece, and what we’ll do is we will pre-compose this so, control-shift-C, and make sure you have move all attributes to new composition. We will call this the logo comp, and all of the things that we do are going to happen to this logo comp. If you need to change anything you just go inside and change it. So, comp 1 out here should be renamed final export, because this is where things will be exported from.Now the next layer we have to make is a control layer, so we’re going to make a new solid, and we’ll make it the comp size and we can set it as white or black, or it doesn’t really matter because we’re going to cover it up using fractal noise. Now fractal noise will generate this nice sort of cloud pattern, and you can change the fractal type and the noise type and all sorts of things. But for our purposes what we’re really interested in increasing the contrast a little bit, perhaps to 150, and you can tweak the brightness if need be. But I think we’ll leave it pretty much as is. We just want to make sure you can see pure black spots and pure white spots, and there is considerable amount of change going on throughout; because this layer is going to control what happens in the next part.The first thing to do is pre-compose this, so control-shift-C again, or Cmd-shift-C, and call this the control comp. And we would like to move our attributes into the new composition so the fractal noise we created stays on that solid and goes into the composition; and hit OK. And you can drag this below the logo comp, or just poke its eye out, because we don’t need to look at it. Now on the logo comp we are going to use something called the card dance, and the card dance basically will break up this layer into a bunch of small cards and then it will animate them using another layer. So we have to say, gradient layer 1 is now the control comp. That means it will be using that gradient and that fractal noise that we put on there, and then multiplying the values underneath the cards and using that to generate position and rotation changes in those cards.So, the first thing we want to do is change the rows and columns of these cards. This will divide the layer up into various rows and columns in order to make the cards. So we would like 90 rows and 160 columns; so we’re dividing its height here into 90 pieces and we’re dividing the width into 160. Since this is a 16 x 9 composition that’s divide it up into squares. Now, when we go down here to the Z position and we say, use the source’s intensity, you can see that it starts to fragment apart into a bunch of little squares. And as you increase the multiplier they start to go all over the place. So let’s set the multiplier at 25 and we’ll set a key frame here at the beginning for it to be at 25, and we’ll most ahead 30 frames holding down shift and page down. And then we’ll set the multiplier down to zero. So the layer kind of collects itself together out of all of these pieces.And we can also put in similar things for the X and Y position as well. So we’ll go back to the beginning here and we’ll set key frame for those. So we’ll set the multiplier here for the X position to be at 25 as well; and we will set the multiplier for the Y position to be at 25 as well. And then we’ll set the source to be intensity one for both. And you can see it spreads them out quite nicely. And you’ll probably need to refine this just to make it a little bit more cohesive so that it isn’t going all over the place.These don’t have to be as extreme, because we are going to also add movement using a camera. So let’s just call up those key frames by hitting U, and then advancing to where they should all come together and making sure they’re all at zero. And we can see how that all comes together. We’re going to want to easy-ease them all into their end state just so it doesn’t happen so abruptly. And now we’re going to create a new camera to add more motion. And we’re going to use the 24 mil. preset, hit OK, and go into the logo comp here. And we’re going to have to tell it to use the camera that is in the comp. So it has built-in camera controls, but we would like to use the composition camera to move things around.So what we’re going to do is we’re going to take this camera and we’re going to transform its position. So, we know its final position should be here, so set a key frame. And before we animate it we want to go layer transform R orient and remove its auto orientation towards this point of interest. It causes too much confusion when you start moving the position, but it’s still locked and staring at a fixed point that doesn’t actually move as well.So now move back to the beginning and we’ll just push the camera forward through this mass of particles until it reaches a point where there are no participles, or there are so few that it doesn’t really matter. And then we’ll also easy-ease that last key frame so that it’s pulling out as it’s coming together; so that looks pretty good. And we’d also like to add a rotation, so put a key frame for the Z rotation, or zed rotation, go back to the beginning and we will just induce perhaps 180 or 90 rotation there so it spins as it comes out, and again, easy-easing that last key frame.So we have the logo coming out and coming together quite nicely. In order to add a motion blur to this though we have to force it to have motion blur. So, type in force motion blur on the effects, and then drag that out onto the composition. And what this does is it over rides any native motion blurs because this effect actually can’t have normal motion blur applied to it. In fact, it doesn’t believe the layer is moving at all, and if you tried to apply motion blur to it it doesn’t believe there’s any vectors for it to apply.So that brings the logo together. We’re going to advance a few frames, as long as you want to have it on. And now to remove the logo we’re going to simply key frame the position, the rotation, and those multipliers again, and move ahead only 10 frames. And now we’re going to set all of these up to be 25 so it’s fragmenting apart. And we are going to go in at -180 on the Z rotation, and we’re going to push back in using the camera’s position. So at around 50 it’s all gone; that’s good. So we can see when it gets ready to break itself apart it’ll look kind of like everything’s flying at the camera; in some kind of vortex.So that’s working out for me. What we’ll do now is we’ll take these inside key frames here of the camera’s movement and we’ll just turn them into auto beziers, which means that these key frames here in the middle are going to be the result of a tween between the two on the edge, just so it has continuous motion and isn’t so boring.Now, the last thing to do is to just take these layers and style them a little bit. So we’ll make a new solid that will serve as the background;set it to whatever color of gray you think is important. But we’re going to use a ramp on that, and what I like to do is use a radial ramp, move the inside to be close to the middle, and move the outside to be beyond the corner; set the end color to be something dark, like 5, and set the inside color to be something a little bit lighter, like 25.Now we can apply a drop shadow to this layer here, and we will set it to be at a distance of 25 and a softness of 25. And we’ll just put the motion blur below that, and you might have to amp up opacity, so you can see it a little better; but there it is. And now what we’ll also be doing is we’ll be adding an alpha bevel, so bevel alpha; again, put that above the drop shadow and set it to a value of 4.Now what this does is it appears that the shadow is being cast on the background, so instead of it looking like we’re pushing a camera through something it’s more like these are coming from behind the camera or materializing in some way. So that shadow just helps to ground the image. And that’s about it. You can do this for example on this text placeholder, and then if someone comes around with a logo they would prefer you to use you can just go in and place it in the comp.Now what you can do is also change it, and just to show you what it looks like when you change things I will put in a star here that has rather ridiculous colors, just scale that down and remove the logo we originally made. And so now you can see that it works for just about anything that you put in there. So this has been Evan Abrams for Premium B.com, your source for royalty free sound effects and music. If you want to learn more go to After Effects or other applications; stop by the blog. There are plenty of other tutorials and tips and tricks from industry experts there. And as always, I’m Evan Abrams, thank you so much for watching, and I’ll see you next time.[/color-box] Create a 3D style mosaic animation in After Effects – perfect for making logos and titles more dynamic!In this After Effects tutorial, you’ll learn how to break apart text or a logo into a mosaic pattern and then quickly reassemble it for an impressive reveal. All of the AE tools used in this tutorial come default with the app, so there’s no need to purchase any fancy (read: expensive) third party plugins or filters.Although some AE experience is suggested before taking on this mosaic animation tutorial, it doesn’t require any advanced scripting or expressions. The fundamentals of the tutorial include:Applying the Fractal Noise plugin to text or logoUsing the Card Dance plugin to break the text or logo into a mosaic patternSimulating movement of the mosaic tiles with the AE virtual cameraApplying Force Motion Blur effect to the animation for a smoother effectAlthough the effect seems like a likely fit for text or a logo, it can actually be applied to any video or graphic element in your AE project. Best of all, the affected element sits in it’s own comp, so you can quickly swap it out for something else with the same animation applied.  For example, if a client decides they want to update their logo you won’t need to go through all of the steps of reanimating it, simply swap out the logo in the comp.This AE mosaic effect is quite simple and will add pizazz to a video editing or motion design project.Tutorial best viewed in full screen:last_img read more

Dhoni in Forbes list of world’s highest paid athletes

first_imgIndian cricket team captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni is the lone Indian sportsman to figure on Forbes’ list of world’s 100 highest paid athletes.The is being been topped by American boxer Floyd Mayweather and includes golfer Tiger Woods and tennis stars Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal.Dhoni is ranked 22nd on the list with total earnings of $30 million and endorsements worth $26 million.His salary and winnings total $four million as of June 2014, Forbes said.”Dhoni cemented his legacy as one of India’s best captains of all time when he led the Indian national team to victory in the 2013 ICC Champions Trophy and became the first national captain to ever win all three ICC trophies,” the publication said.Dhoni signed bat sponsorship deals with leading brands like Spartan Sports and Amity University in late 2013 reportedly worth a combined USD four million annually, up from the USD one million Reebok was paying previously, it added.The earning figures include salaries, bonuses, prize money, appearance fees, as well as licensing and endorsement income paid out during the last 12 months between June 2013 and June 2014.Mayweather earned USD 105 million during the past year for 72 minutes of work in the ring for fights against Canelo Alvarez and Marcos Maidana.The payday puts Mayweather at the top of Forbes’ annual list of the world’s highest-paid athletes for the second time in three years. .Mayweather is the first athlete, besides Woods, to crack the USD 100 million earnings threshold.Real Madrid and star Portugal footballer Cristiano Ronaldo leads a group of 15 soccer players in the top 100.advertisementRonaldo ranks second overall with total earnings of USD 80 million.American basketball player LeBron James ranks third with earnings of USD 72.3 million, followed by Argentine footballer Lionel Messi who ranks fourth at USD 64.7 million. Woods is ranked sixth on the list with earnings of USD 61.2 million.Forbes said Woods’ golf course-design business has picked up after multiple blowups.Developers plan to open a new course in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico this year which will be the first completed Woods-designed course.Federer, who holds the record for most singles Grand Slam wins (17) and career prize money (USD 81 million) is ranked seventh on the list with earnings of USD 56.2 million.”Federer continues to be among the world’s best players 16 years after he turned pro. His sponsors collectively pay him more than USD 40 million annually,” Forbes said.Nadal is ranked ninth on the list with earnings of USD 44.5 million.The list also includes tennis player Novak Djokovic on the 17th rank with earnings of USD 33.1 million, tennis star Maria Sharapova (34), Jamaican runner Usain Bolt (45), tennis player Serena Williams (55) and German Formula One racing driver Sebastian Vettel (83).last_img read more