Price increase forecast for California raisins

first_imgThe price of California raisins is set to rise, following a drop in production and exports. With the crop yet to be harvested, there is currently less than a month’s supply on hand, and the squeeze on availability was compounded by wet weather last week.”We’re into a new era of prices,” Kalem Barserian, president of American Dried Fruit Co told BB. He predicted the price per (short) ton would rise from $1,323 to $1,500, based on a smaller crop this year, down from 298,532 tons last year to 287,000 tons. The tonnage available to export was predicted to plummet from 160,218 to 100,000. Last year the UK imported 32,000 tons from California.”We estimate 20% or 60,000 tons is still exposed, with losses amounting to about 20%,” he added last week.Gary Shulz, president of the California Raisin Administrative Committee, revealed that, for the first time in seven years, supply and demand were finely balanced. “This will affect price,” he said. Prices of Turkish raisins were expected to follow suit.last_img read more

Leon Bridges Performs “If It Feels Good” On ‘The Late Late Show’ [Watch]

first_imgLeon Bridges was the featured musical guest on Wednesday night’s episode of The Late Late Show with James Corden. The performance of the lively song “If It Feels Good” acted as Bridges’ latest promotional appearance behind his 2018 sophomore album, Good Thing.Related: Pilgrimage Festival Announces 2019 Lineup: Foo Fighters, Leon Bridges, Nathaniel Rateliff, MoreBridges wore a stylish mix of bellbottoms with a white cowboy-style hat (he is from Texas) for his performance on the popular late-night talk show. The 29-year-old singer kept himself almost intimately close to his microphone throughout the majority of the performance, but like the showman he is, found a way to sprinkle in a few subtle but fun dance moves here and there. Check out the televised performance below:Leon Bridges – “If It Feels Good” [Video: The Late Late Show with James Corden]Leon Bridges was on tour for much of 2018 alongside artists like Khruangbin and Jon Batiste in the promotion of his latest studio album. He’ll remain on the road with more performances scheduled for the 2019 spring months with support from Jess Glynne. Some of the material featured on Bridges’ 2018 album was even strong enough to find its way onto former President Barack Obama‘s “Best of 2018” compilation list.Bridges’ next show is scheduled for April 11th at Charlotte, NC’s Charlotte Metro Credit Union Amphitheatre. Fans can head to Bridges’ website for tickets and tour info.last_img read more

Walk this way

first_img Researchers seek clues among an exceptional group: The injury-free HMS’s Sinclair discusses new nonprofit academy for work on extending the human lifespan Longevity and anti-aging research: ‘Prime time for an impact on the globe’ In the world of step goals and activity trackers, the number 10,000 can sound like a magic one. A large body of evidence shows that physical activity is good for health and longevity, and many wearable devices that track the steps a person takes each day come preprogrammed with a daily goal of 10,000. But few studies have examined how many steps a day are associated with long-term health outcomes.A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women’s Hospital sought to address this knowledge gap by examining outcomes over an average of more than four years for older women in the Women’s Health Study who had measured their steps for a full week. The team reports that, among this cohort, as few as 4,400 steps a day was significantly associated with lower risk of death compared with taking 2,700 steps a day. Risk of death continued to decrease with more steps taken but leveled off at around 7,500 steps a day — less than the default goal in many wearables. The team’s results were presented Tuesday at the American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting and published in JAMA Internal Medicine.“Taking 10,000 steps a day can sound daunting. But we find that even a modest increase in steps taken is tied to significantly lower mortality in older women,” said I-Min Lee, an epidemiologist in the Division of Preventive Medicine at the Brigham. “Our study adds to a growing understanding of the importance of physical activity for health, clarifies the number of steps related to lower mortality, and amplifies the message ‘step more.’ Even a little more is helpful.”According to previous studies, the average American takes between 4,000 and 5,000 steps a day. The origin of the 10,000-step goal is unclear but may trace back to 1965, when a Japanese company began marketing a pedometer called amanpo-kei, which translates to “10,000 steps meter” in Japanese.To conduct their study, Lee and her colleagues included participants from the Women’s Health Study, a randomized trial originally conducted to evaluate risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer among women taking low-dose aspirin and vitamin E. When the original trial ended, participants were invited to take part in a long-term observational study. For the present study of steps and health, almost 18,000 women were asked to wear an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer device — a research-grade wearable — on their hips for seven consecutive days during all waking hours. The team analyzed 16,741 of the women who were compliant with wearing the device; their average age was 72.The women were followed for an average of more than four years, during which time 504 of them died. Participants in the bottom 25 percent of steps walked (averaging 2,700 steps a day) were at the greatest risk of death, with 275 women dying. Those who walked a little more (an average of 4,400 a day) were at 41 percent lower risk of death. Risk of death continued to decrease with more steps walked, up to 7,500 steps per day, after which risk leveled off. The team also found that for women who walked the same number of steps a day, the intensity — how fast or slow they walked — was not associated with risk of death.Due to the observational nature of the study, the authors cannot definitively separate causation from correlation (that is, determine whether more steps lower mortality or women in better health step more). However, the team did take several measures to try to ensure that the association was more likely causal than not, such as excluding women with heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and less than excellent or good self-rated health. The findings also are supported by previous experiments showing that physical activity causes beneficial changes in short-term markers of health such as blood pressure, insulin and glucose levels, lipid profile, inflammation, and more. Related The Women’s Health Study included primarily older, white women, and further research will be needed in younger and more diverse populations to determine if the findings apply to other groups, especially those who, on average, take more steps. Other outcomes, such as quality of life and risk of specific diseases, were not assessed, but will be addressed in future studies.“Of course, no single study stands alone,” said Lee. “But our work continues to make the case for the importance of physical activity. Clearly, even a modest number of steps was related to lower mortality rate among these older women. We hope these findings provide encouragement for individuals for whom 10,000 steps a day may seem unattainable.”Funding for this work was provided by the National Institutes of Health.A co-author of the paper received personal and travel fees from ActiGraph outside of the submitted work and is a member of its scientific advisory board; the device used in this study was selected in 2009, prior to his involvement in the study. Where runners go wronglast_img read more

4-H Food Product

first_imgBusy lives and busy schedules often mean that families put convenience ahead of nutrition when it comes to eating on the go, but Georgia 4-H’ers have developed new food products that add a nutritional punch to the ready-to-eat food market.Four teams of Georgia 4-H’ers traveled to the University of Georgia’s Athens campus last weekend to showcase their new food product prototypes as part of the Georgia 4-H’s Food Product Development Contest.This year’s product proposals included a shelf-stable yogurt snack, a honey-tinged oatmeal breakfast bar, an antioxidant-packed berry juice drink and a cheese cracker developed for people with dairy allergies.In their third year in the contest, the Cheez Beez team from Walker County walked away with first prize for their dairy-free cheese crackers. They have participated in the contest since 2016. Each year, they refined their crackers and their presentation.They developed their concept for a vegan cheese cracker after learning that one of their fellow Walker County 4-H’ers was diagnosed with a dairy intolerance that prevented her from eating cheese. After talking to the mothers of other children who could not eat dairy foods, they thought a dairy-free alternative to those ubiquitous, fish-shaped cheese crackers might find a foothold on crowded grocery store shelves.The LaFayette, Georgia-based team included LaFayette High School juniors Rylie Chamlee and Jenna Sweatmon and seniors Lauren Pike and Tori Lowrance. Walker County 4-H’s Casey Hobbs coached the team.As part of the contest, the 4-H’ers must develop a recipe for a new food product, research the market for the product, create a marketing plan, and design a food safety and manufacturing plan for the product. They pitch their product to a panel of judges from the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) Department of Food Science and Technology.In addition to recognizing the Walker County team, the judges awarded a second-place plaque to Floyd County 4-H’ers for their Clover Cups, a breakfast bar produced by Mason Daniel, Natalie Daniel, Karmen Holbert and Veeka Malenchuk and coached by Floyd County Cooperative Extension Agent Abbie Salmon.Terrell County 4-H’ers Alyssa Dunbar, Larry Hall, Wanya Hall, DarVarous Jones, Janya Scott and Sebastian Shattles took third place with Burri-licious, an antioxidant-packed berry juice tonic. Terrell County 4-H’s Margaret Halbrook coached the team.An honorable mention went to the Haralson County 4-H team for YAP, a shelf-stable yogurt snack developed by team members Ayshanna Frazier, Rachel Ibbetson, Rebekah Ibbetson and Jozie Mize. Haralson County 4-H’s Jenelle Hanyon coached the team.“Every year these students blow us away with their creativity, dedication and attention to detail,” said Cheryl Varnadoe. “Each one of these products deserves a spot on the shelf at the local grocery store, and we’re proud that Georgia 4-H gives these students the ability to develop their entrepreneurial skills while learning about nutrition and food safety.”For more information about the wide range of programs offered by Georgia 4-H, visit www.georgia4H.org.last_img read more

PAHO helps Latin American nations prepare to fight Ebola

first_imgUruguay is requiring that all passengers arriving in the country must complete a questionnaire about their health status, the Uruguayan Ministry of Health told El Observador on October 9. If a case of Ebola is detected in a Latin American or Caribbean country, PAHO/WHO medical experts and representatives from the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) will be deployed to that nation, to assist national health authorities in carrying out their response plans. Creating an Ebola emergency fund, to pay for the high costs of treating patients infected with the virus. With the exception of a handful of cases in Europe and the United States, almost all Ebola patients have been stricken in Libera, Sierra Leone, and Guinea. In addition to participating in such meetings, PAHO/WHO is working closely with the health ministries of its member countries to ensure they have the necessary policies, procedures and human resource capacity in place to treat and contain Ebola. In Guatemala the government has installed thermal cameras at La Aurora International Airport, in the capital of the country, to detect the body temperature of passengers. A team of agents will work with the equipment 24 hours a day; if they identify someone with a fever, they’ll check the person’s passport to see whether the person had been in Africa, and then send them for a clinical exam. Depending on the case, the traveler may be quarantined, according to Guatemala’s Ministry of Health. For example, with technical support from PAHO, Honduran health officials have set up an International Health Surveillance Office (OSVI) at the Toncontín International Airport in Tegucigalpa. Similar offices will also be installed at airports in the cities of San Pedro Sula, La Ceiba and Roatán. In addition to participating in such meetings, PAHO/WHO is working closely with the health ministries of its member countries to ensure they have the necessary policies, procedures and human resource capacity in place to treat and contain Ebola. Monitoring suspected cases of Ebola among international travelers and in health centers. PAHO has created a special Ebola task force and operational working group to advise and support member nations in carrying out these recommendations: PAHO/WHO missions will visit member countries in November and December to assess how prepared those nations are to detect, treat, and contain any imported cases of the deadly virus. PAHO/WHO missions will visit member countries in November and December to assess how prepared those nations are to detect, treat, and contain any imported cases of the deadly virus. “There is a real risk that Ebola could be introduced into Latin America and the Caribbean,” Dr. Carissa F. Etienne, director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), told representatives of several South American nations at a conference in Havana October 20. “The region has to be properly prepared.” The Ebola epidemic has infected approximately 10,000 people and killed almost 5,000, almost all of them in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Symptoms include a high fever, headaches, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and general weakness – and may appear as late as 21 days after exposure. Those exposed to the virus are only infectious while they are suffering symptoms of the disease. Ebola is transmitted between humans via direct contact with bodily fluids and secretions. It can also be transmitted by contact with infected human corpses or infected animals, in addition to contaminated clothes, needles and other objects. With the exception of a handful of cases in Europe and the United States, almost all Ebola patients have been stricken in Libera, Sierra Leone, and Guinea. Chilean health officials recently convened a committee of doctors, including epidemiologists, to support the oversight and control efforts against Ebola, according to the Health Ministry. While PAHO plans for coordinated action against an Ebola outbreak, individual Latin American nations have prepared local response plans and procedures. Chilean health officials recently convened a committee of doctors, including epidemiologists, to support the oversight and control efforts against Ebola, according to the Health Ministry. For more information on PAHO guidelines, visit the website www.paho.org/ebola. Creating an Ebola emergency fund, to pay for the high costs of treating patients infected with the virus. In Guatemala the government has installed thermal cameras at La Aurora International Airport, in the capital of the country, to detect the body temperature of passengers. A team of agents will work with the equipment 24 hours a day; if they identify someone with a fever, they’ll check the person’s passport to see whether the person had been in Africa, and then send them for a clinical exam. Depending on the case, the traveler may be quarantined, according to Guatemala’s Ministry of Health. In Guatemala the government has installed thermal cameras at La Aurora International Airport, in the capital of the country, to detect the body temperature of passengers. A team of agents will work with the equipment 24 hours a day; if they identify someone with a fever, they’ll check the person’s passport to see whether the person had been in Africa, and then send them for a clinical exam. Depending on the case, the traveler may be quarantined, according to Guatemala’s Ministry of Health. If a case of Ebola is detected in a Latin American or Caribbean country, PAHO/WHO medical experts and representatives from the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) will be deployed to that nation, to assist national health authorities in carrying out their response plans. For more information on PAHO guidelines, visit the website www.paho.org/ebola. Conduct all laboratory tests in accordance with the best biosafety protocols. Communicate with the public by providing accurate information about the disease. By Dialogo November 05, 2014center_img For example, with technical support from PAHO, Honduran health officials have set up an International Health Surveillance Office (OSVI) at the Toncontín International Airport in Tegucigalpa. Similar offices will also be installed at airports in the cities of San Pedro Sula, La Ceiba and Roatán. PAHO/WHO officials are participating in a series of training sessions – both virtual and face-to-face – on such issues as logistics, preparedness, and communicating risks to the population. The training also involves the dissemination of protocols and guidelines for infection control and the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) to health officials and physicians in each country. PAHO/WHO is also providing guidance on how to safely collect and analyze samples with highly pathogenic agents, the best ways to conduct disease surveillance and laboratory procedures. Provide isolation rooms to treat patients infected with the virus, in specially designated health centers. PAHO/WHO officials are participating in a series of training sessions – both virtual and face-to-face – on such issues as logistics, preparedness, and communicating risks to the population. The training also involves the dissemination of protocols and guidelines for infection control and the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) to health officials and physicians in each country. PAHO/WHO is also providing guidance on how to safely collect and analyze samples with highly pathogenic agents, the best ways to conduct disease surveillance and laboratory procedures. In Guatemala the government has installed thermal cameras at La Aurora International Airport, in the capital of the country, to detect the body temperature of passengers. A team of agents will work with the equipment 24 hours a day; if they identify someone with a fever, they’ll check the person’s passport to see whether the person had been in Africa, and then send them for a clinical exam. Depending on the case, the traveler may be quarantined, according to Guatemala’s Ministry of Health. Conduct all laboratory tests in accordance with the best biosafety protocols. Almost all Ebola cases have been in West Africa International cooperation is crucial in containing Ebola, should a case appear in Latin America or the Caribbean. At the same time, invididual countries ust “take steps within their jurdiction, with the resources available” to prepare for the virus, Etienne said during a meeting of health care professionals in El Salvador on October 17. In Argentina, the Ministry of Health is enacting health protocols at international points of entry to identify people with infections. Before an airplane lands in Argentina, the plane’s crew must report to Argentinian health officials whether any passengers are displaying symptoms similar to Ebola, such as a high fever, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Argentina is also using a special diagnostic method for rapid confirmation of suspected cases of Ebola. PAHO, which serves as the regional Office of the Americas for the World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) is mobilizing teams of physicians and epidemiologists who are experienced in responding to outbreaks of disease to help member states in Central and South America and the Caribbean to respond to any cases of Ebola. Provide isolation rooms to treat patients infected with the virus, in specially designated health centers. Almost all Ebola cases have been in West Africa Communicate with the public by providing accurate information about the disease. While PAHO plans for coordinated action against an Ebola outbreak, individual Latin American nations have prepared local response plans and procedures. International cooperation is crucial in containing Ebola, should a case appear in Latin America or the Caribbean. At the same time, invididual countries ust “take steps within their jurdiction, with the resources available” to prepare for the virus, Etienne said during a meeting of health care professionals in El Salvador on October 17. Although there have as yet been no confirmed cases of the deadly Ebola virus in Latin America, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) is preparing to help health authorities to battle the disease if it appears in the region. “There is a real risk that Ebola could be introduced into Latin America and the Caribbean,” Dr. Carissa F. Etienne, director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), told representatives of several South American nations at a conference in Havana October 20. “The region has to be properly prepared.” PAHO, which serves as the regional Office of the Americas for the World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) is mobilizing teams of physicians and epidemiologists who are experienced in responding to outbreaks of disease to help member states in Central and South America and the Caribbean to respond to any cases of Ebola. In Argentina, the Ministry of Health is enacting health protocols at international points of entry to identify people with infections. Before an airplane lands in Argentina, the plane’s crew must report to Argentinian health officials whether any passengers are displaying symptoms similar to Ebola, such as a high fever, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Argentina is also using a special diagnostic method for rapid confirmation of suspected cases of Ebola. Monitoring suspected cases of Ebola among international travelers and in health centers. Uruguay is requiring that all passengers arriving in the country must complete a questionnaire about their health status, the Uruguayan Ministry of Health told El Observador on October 9. PAHO has created a special Ebola task force and operational working group to advise and support member nations in carrying out these recommendations: The Ebola epidemic has infected approximately 10,000 people and killed almost 5,000, almost all of them in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Symptoms include a high fever, headaches, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and general weakness – and may appear as late as 21 days after exposure. Those exposed to the virus are only infectious while they are suffering symptoms of the disease. Ebola is transmitted between humans via direct contact with bodily fluids and secretions. It can also be transmitted by contact with infected human corpses or infected animals, in addition to contaminated clothes, needles and other objects. Although there have as yet been no confirmed cases of the deadly Ebola virus in Latin America, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) is preparing to help health authorities to battle the disease if it appears in the region. International organizations such as Rotary, for example, if they are not already participating in the anti-Ebola crusade, they should be contacted to get involved due to their financial and human capacity as well as their huge networks of contacts in various countries on other continents, not only in Latin America. Wow, so sad.last_img read more

Health Officials Warn of Hamptons Hepatitis Scare

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County health department officials are urging anyone who ate or drank at the Driver’s Seat Restaurant in Southampton this month to get vaccinated this weekend for possible exposure to Hepatitis A.The Suffolk County Department of Health Services is also investigating the case in which an infected individual who worked at the eatery on Jobs Lane between Aug. 6-20, meaning that some patrons can lessen the potential severity of the illness by seeking treatment within two weeks of exposure.“Preventive treatment is not recommended for individuals potentially exposed before August 16,” the health department said in a news release.Treatment is offered at Southampton Hospital, 240 Meeting House Lane, in the 3rd Floor Teaching Center 3-6 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, Sunday and Monday as well as 3-6 p.m. Tuesday.Treatment will also be offered at the Suffolk health department’s Great River office, 3500 Sunrise Hwy, Suite 124, form 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday.Anyone potentially exposed to the virus that causes inflammation of the liver can also receive preventive treatment from their health care provider, officials said.Symptoms that often appear within 28 days include fever, fatigue, poor appetite, nausea, stomach pain, dark-colored urine and jaundice, or a yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes. There is no specific treatment for Hepatitis A besides supportive care. Exposed pregnant women are urged to consult their doctor.For additional information or questions about possible exposure, call the Suffolk County Department of Health Services hotline at 631-787-2200 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m.last_img read more

Man Found Dead in Ocean Off Lido Beach

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A dead man’s body was found floating in the Atlantic Ocean south of Long Island on Friday morning, Nassau County police said.A group was fishing when found the body floating face down in the water 1.5 miles south of Lido Beach at 11 a.m., police said.The U.S. Coast Guard responded along with the Marine Bureau and Aviation Unit officers to recover the body, which was taken to the Nassau County Medical Examiner’s office, where an autopsy will be conducted to determine the man’s cause of death and identity.Police said the unidentified man was black, about 55 to 60 years old, average build, balding with black and gray hair. He was wearing a blue pattern buttoned shirt, red plaid pajama pants and black slip on shoes was recovered.Fourth Squad detectives request anyone with information regarding this person to contact Nassau County Crime Stoppers at 1-800-244-TIPS. All callers will remain anonymous.last_img read more

Mexico to Long Island Heroin Pipeline Busted, DA Says

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Heroin traffickers disguised as travelers drove an SUV mounted with bicycles and a kayak while smuggling up to $12 million worth of the drug monthly from Mexico to New York, authorities said.Undercover Nassau County detectives who bought a pound of heroin in Manhasset and Great Neck traced it to the source over the course of an 18-month continuing joint investigation with New York City and federal authorities, prosecutors said. When New Jersey State Police stopped the alleged drug ring’s Dodge Durango on Sept. 23, investigators said they found about 5 kilos of vacuum-packed black tar heroin hidden in the engine block—making it undetectable to drug-sniffing dogs at the U.S.-Mexico border.“A border patrol dog would not have picked it up, it was so well secreted,” Rick Whelan, chief of the Nassau district attorney’s organized crime bureau, told reporters Thursday during a news conference announcing the bust. “That car blends in. It traveled up from Mexico through California, across the country… to New York. It just looked like a couple of people on vacation.”Of nine suspects that have been rounded up in what investigators dubbed “Operation Smackdown,” two Queens men were charged in Nassau County court. They include 38-year-old Ajay Carter, aka Jose Zambrano, and 42-year-old Miguel Tormo, who both pleaded not guilty last month to charges of criminal sale of a controlled substance. Their attorneys were not immediately available for comment.Read more: How Long Island is Losing its War on Heroin Authorities released this flow chart showing how they allege the heroin made its way from heroin to New York City and Long Island.The 24-year-old alleged ringleader, Cesar “Menor” Romero-Astudillo of the Bronx, is accused of ordering two unidentified traffickers to drive the heroin-filled SUV from Mexico to what prosecutors described as a network of drug houses. The truck was taken apart at an Astoria auto body shop, the smuggling compartment would be packed with millions in cash and then the truck would drive back to Mexico, authorities said. Romero-Astudillo also allegedly had drug mules swallow balloons filled with heroin and fly to New York.Taylor Koss, the Manhattan-based attorney for Romero-Astudillo, who also pleaded not guilty to drug charges last month, said investigators did not find any heroin in his client’s possession and he is still awaiting copies of the wiretap evidence authorities said they used to make their case. He said it was unusual for his client to be charged with operating as a major trafficker “but not have any narcotics attributed to him.” A Manhattan judge ordered he be held without bail and he faces 25 years to life in prison, if convicted.In the Nassau case, Carter also allegedly sold cocaine, MDMA—aka ecstasy or molly—and anabolic steroids through Craigslist by using code words. Judge Teresa Corrigan set bail for him and Tormo at $5 million bond or $2.5 million cash. Carter faces up to 40 years in prison and Tormo faces up to 20 years in prison, if convicted. They are due back in court on Jan. 8.Authorities noted the rise in fatal heroin overdoses on LI in recent years was an unintended side effect of the crackdown on prescription drug abuse that made addicts turn to heroin when pill supplies dried up. Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice said: “This case proves that the battle lines in our fight to save lives in the midst of a devastating heroin epidemic don’t end at any border.”last_img read more

COVID-19 spreads among Indonesian government officials

first_imgAmir died the following day at around 8:15 a.m. He was 60.The State Palace announced on March 14 that Transportation Minister Budi Karya Sumadi had tested positive for COVID-19. He was the first Indonesian official to be diagnosed with the contagious respiratory disease.Budi, who has long struggled with asthma, was directly involved in the evacuation process of 238 Indonesians from the epicenter of the virus outbreak in Wuhan, China, as well as 257 Indonesians from the virus-stricken World Dream and Diamond Princess cruise ships.The minister’s health is reportedly improving as he undergoes medical treatment at the Gatot Subroto Army Hospital (RSPAD) in Jakarta.  “He’s getting better every day,” Transportation Ministry spokesperson Adita Irawati said recently, confirming that Budi was in stable condition.Before being hospitalized, Budi attended a cabinet meeting led by President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo on March 11. After the announcement that Budi had tested positive, President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo and his Cabinet were also tested for the disease. Jokowi announced earlier this week that he and his wife, First Lady Iriana, had tested negative. The test results of the other ministers have yet to be announced.Adita announced on Tuesday that another high-ranking official at the Transportation Ministry had also been diagnosed with the new coronavirus.”The Transportation Ministry’s railway director general, Zulfikri, has been tested positive for COVID-19. He’s now in good condition and undergoing self-quarantine [at home].”Zulfikri and other officials at the ministry were given swab tests on March 18.The director general separately confirmed that he was self-isolating at home. Before taking the test, he had undergone treatment at Eka Hospital in South Tangerang, Banten, from March 9 to 13. He was initially diagnosed with pneumonia. “I encourage those who had physical contact with me recently [and] show symptoms of COVID-19 to immediately undergo a medical checkup to break the transmission chain,” Zulfikri said Tuesday. Also on Tuesday, West Java Governor Ridwan Kamil announced that Karawang Regent Cellica Nurrachadiana had COVID-19. Three top officials from the province have now tested positive. The other two are Bogor Mayor Bima Arya and Bandung Deputy Mayor Yana Mulyana. Read also: Greater Jakarta failing as floodgate to nationwide COVID-19 epidemicBima took a swab test on March 17 after returning from a work-related trip to Turkey the previous day. Prior to the trip, he reportedly attended a seminar in Bogor, which has been scrutinized following reports that four participants had tested positive for COVID-19. Two have died at Moewardi Regional Hospital in Surakarta, Central Java. Yana, meanwhile, attended an event held by the Indonesian Young Entrepreneurs Association in Karawang on March 9-10 prior to showing symptoms, including fever, dry cough and shortness of breath.West Java was among the worst-hit areas in Indonesia. It reported 60 confirmed cases on Tuesday, with 10 deaths. Jakarta topped the list with 424 positive cases and 31 deaths, followed by Banten with 65 cases and 4 deathsAs of Tuesday, Indonesia has reported 686 confirmed cases of COVID-19, with 55 deaths. Topics : At least five high-ranking central and regional government officials have tested positive for COVID-19 as of Tuesday.Meanwhile, two others who had yet to be tested died on Monday after reportedly showing symptoms of the disease: the Industry Ministry’s metal, machinery, transportation equipment and electronic industry (ILMATE) director general, Harjanto, and the ministry’s expert staff member, Amir Sambodo. Harjanto died at Medistra Hospital in Jakarta on Monday at around 9:30 p.m. The 58-year old suffered from shortness of breath prior to the death,  Industry Ministry spokesperson Krisna Sulistyani said Tuesday as reported by kompas.com. last_img read more

UPDATE: No one injured in morning blaze in Napoleon

first_imgCrews on the scene of the fire on W. Main St. in Napoleon Tuesday. (Image: Delbert Felix)Update (11:22 a.m.)Nobody was injured in a residential fire in Napoleon early Tuesday. Fire crews were paged out shortly before 1 a.m. and remained on the scene for several hours.Napoleon Assistant Fire Chief Ron Reynolds Jr. said the electrical fire was sparked by overloaded space heaters.There is some damage to the home but it is not considered a total loss.Fire crews were assisted on the scene by Rescue 69 and the local chapter of the Red Cross.   First Report (6:50 a.m.)NAPOLEON, Ind. – Firefighters were on the scene of a house fire in the 3700 block of W. Main Street in Napoleon early Tuesday morning.Napoleon, Osgood, Batesville, and Versailles crews were reportedly on the scene along with Rescue 69 shortly after 1 a.m.No word on any injuries.We will release additional details if or when we receive them.last_img read more