“Journalists are not terrorists”

first_img Receive email alerts News RSF condemns NYT reporter’s unprecedented expulsion from Ethiopia RSF_en May 18, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders has just visited Ethiopia, where two Swedish journalists, Kontinent news agency reporter Martin Schibbye and photographer Johan Persson, were sentenced to 11 years in prison on 29 December on charges of entering the country illegally and supporting terrorism.During the visit, from 9 to 12 January, the two Swedish journalists decided to request a presidential pardon instead of appealing against their conviction. “In Ethiopia, there is a long tradition of pardons and we have chosen to leave it to this tradition,” they said, announcing their decision on 10 January in Addis Ababa’s Kality prison.“Persson and Schibbye were arrested with members of the Ogaden National Liberation Front but they never supported terrorism,” Reporters Without Borders said. “They went to the Ogaden as journalists. We are now in a new phase, one of political negotiation, and we hope that the Ethiopian authorities, the National Pardon Board and everyone else involved can reach an agreement under which they are released quickly.”During the visit, Reporters Without Borders also assessed the current state of media freedom in Ethiopia and the constraints on its journalists, two of whom were convicted on terrorism charges on 19 January in Addis Ababa.A repressive legislative arsenal and dwindling room for expressionEven if recent years have been marked by tension between the government and privately-owned media and surveillance of the most outspoken journalists, Reporters Without Borders recognizes that there is space for freedom of expression in Ethiopia. As well as two state-owned dailies, the Amharic-language Addis Zemen and the English-language Ethiopian Herald, there are also privately-owned newspapers such as the Amharic-language Reporter, Addis Admas, Sendek, Mesenazeria and Fitih, along with the English-language The Reporter and The Daily Monitor. The privately-owned newspapers are routinely critical of government policies and at times provocative.But, in the course of its observations and the interviews it conducted during this visit, Reporters Without Borders confirmed that freedom of expression has been on the wane for some time. This has been seen, for example, in the fact that two Amharic-language weeklies, Addis Neger and Awramba Times, ceased to publish when their journalists fled the country, in December 2009 in the case of the first, and November 2011 in the case of the second.In the course of the past three years, Ethiopia has adopted laws targeting civil society and combating terrorism that have arguably rode roughshod over rights guaranteed by Ethiopia’s constitution. It is partly this legislative arsenal that has had the direct effect of reducing the democratic space and freedom of expression.Taboo subjects and working as a journalistSpeaking on condition of anonymity, an Ethiopian journalist who works for one of the weeklies told Reporters Without Borders: “There are red lines we cannot trespass while covering news stories. For example, the Oromo Liberation Front, which has long been a separatist movement, announced a few days ago on a website based abroad that it was abandoning its demand for autonomy. This is big news for Ethiopia but we cannot cover it in the local press because the authorities regard the OLF as a terrorist organization and referring to it might get you arrested.”The journalist added: “We cannot publish the views of certain people, either. The journalist Mesfin Negash of Addis Neger, for example, is wanted on a terrorism charge. As he is living in exile, he can still write articles and offer them to newspapers in Ethiopia. But who is going to take the risk of publishing them? You could possibly be picked up at once and face charges. The law forbids it, so it is indirect censorship.”Reporters Without Borders is concerned that when journalists with the privately-owned media dare to persist with their fierce criticisms of the state, it happens that they become the targets of criticism or smear campaigns in the state-owned or pro-government media.Widespread self-censorship and fear of arrest have also at times led journalists to flee the country. After those who fled in December 2009, at least another three left in November 2011. They were Abebe Tola, also known as “Abe Tokichaw,” a well-known columnist for the Fitih and Awramba Times weeklies, his colleague Tesfaye Degu of Netsanet and Awramba Times editor Dawit Kebede.Journalists facing a possible death sentence on terrorism chargesReporters Without Borders wrote to Prime Minister Meles Zenawi in August 2011 requesting an investigation into the condition in which two journalists were being held – Awramba Times deputy editor Woubeshet Taye, who was arrested on 19 June, and Fitih columnist Reyot Alemu, who was arrested on 21 June. The letter did not get a reply.In Addis Ababa, Reporters Without Borders asked the NGO “Justice for all, Prison Fellowship Ethiopia” to make enquiries about their situation and work with the government to assure that they are held in acceptable conditions while in detention.On 19 January, an Addis Ababa court found these two journalists, along with a number of opposition figures, guilty of participating in a terrorist organization and preparing a terrorist attack. The charges carry a possible death penalty or life imprisonment. The court is due to issue sentences on a later date.“Was there any irrefutable evidence of their involvement in terrorist activity produced in court?” Reporters Without Borders asked. “As showed by the prosecutor, both may have been in contact with opposition figures, which was risky, but the court should have considered the possibility that it could have been done in the exercise of freedom of expression. We are very disturbed by the idea that these two journalists may well receive harsh sentences just for expressing opinions. “The Ethiopian government says the court just followed the law, but this law could violate journalists’ freedom to practice their profession, a freedom guaranteed by the constitution. A journalist carries a tough duty to proving information to the public. He needs special protection in order to fulfill this duty. This law in Ethiopia no longer allows journalists to do their job in that sense.” Follow the news on Ethiopia News February 10, 2021 Find out more Journalist attacked, threatened in her Addis Ababa home Newscenter_img Help by sharing this information Ethiopia arbitrarily suspends New York Times reporter’s accreditation May 21, 2021 Find out more News Organisation EthiopiaAfrica to go further EthiopiaAfrica January 24, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 “Journalists are not terrorists”last_img read more

Existing fuel allowance season extended by 4 weeks

first_imgFacebook Linkedin Covid antibody testing opens to public at Shannon Airport RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR ‘Everything tells us we are moving forward’ Twitter WhatsApp Government announces phased easing of public health restrictions NewsCommunityPoliticsExisting fuel allowance season extended by 4 weeksBy Cian Reinhardt – April 7, 2020 1491 Mass COVID testing to take place at University of Limerick following fresh outbreak of virus among student population center_img Print TAGSCommunityCoronavirusCovid 19Fuel AllowanceLimerick City and CountyNewspolitics Institute of Public Health addresses loneliness as a challenge to national health in light of Covid-19 restrictions Email Limerick health chiefs urge public not to withhold information on virus contacts, as they investigate “complex and serious outbreaks” across midwest region Advertisement Previous articleRadiographers in UHL making everyone smileNext articleThe Easter Bunny given the green light for this weekend Cian Reinhardthttp://www.limerickpost.ieJournalist & Digital Media Coordinator. Covering human interest and social issues as well as creating digital content to accompany news stories. [email protected] Winter photo created by Dragana_Gordic – www.freepik.comFINE Gael Minister, Patrick O’Donovan has confirmed the fuel allowance season is to be extended by four weeks for eligible customers.The Limerick County TD has said the extension is in response to the COVID-19 emergency and says his government colleagues have “committed to extending the fuel allowance season by four weeks” which will see the current season run to Friday, May 8 from April 10.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The Minister of State said, “At a time where we wish people to stay at home to stay safe, it makes perfect sense to extend the Fuel Season for existing eligible customers on a once-off basis, in order to ensure the most vulnerable groups are provided with additional targeted financial supports in a timely and efficient manner.”O’Donovan noted that the extension will “ensure those in receipt of this payment have one less thing to worry about” and will allow people to stay “safe and warm” at home for the coming period.The Fuel Allowance payment is made to over 370,000 of the most disadvantaged households in the country including pensioners and those with disabilities, who are most at risk of fuel poverty.The current fuel allowance season is paid at a rate of €24.50 per week for 28 weeks, with the current season due to finish on April 10, and will now be extended to Friday, May 8.last_img read more

Men’s volleyball sweeps UCSB Gauchos

first_imgThe No. 1 USC Trojans continued their five-match road trip with a 25-20, 25-22, 25-22 sweep at No. 6 UC Santa Barbara on Wednesday.The Trojans (5-0, 5-0) continued to show their outstanding attacking efficiency, finishing the first set with a blazing hot .625 hitting percentage and finishing the match with a .493 hitting percentage in comparison to the Gauchos’ (4-3, 2-2) .337.Win streak · Senior setter Riley McKibbin has played a vital role in leading the Trojans to a 5-0 start — the program’s best since 1994. – Brandon Hui | Daily Trojan Senior opposite and co-captain Murphy Troy led the charge with 12 kills, finishing with a remarkable .632 hitting percentage and no hitting errors.Junior outside hitter Tony Ciarelli finished with nine kills and six digs.“They had some good point runs in the second and third sets,” said USC coach Bill Ferguson. “They came off some quick spurts at the service line for them. It’s not much to worry about.”Passing was deft, leading to a high number of opportunities to attack for the Trojans’ two talented middle blockers. Senior middle blocker Austin Zahn finished with seven kills on 11 attempts and junior middle blocker Steven Shandrick finished with seven kills on 10 attempts.“I really liked that we ran them, and the both did really well,” Ferguson said. “Especially since Austin had a guy committed to him all night.”Sophomore outside hitter Maddison McKibbin provided a huge block in the third set on Irons. He also had a key dig at the 22-20 mark in transition that gave the Trojans a three-point cushion.“Maddy came in and did very well, and had a huge effect on two crucial points,” Ferguson said. “Our two-headed monster with [McKibbin] and [Senior outside hitter] Tri Bourne is huge.”The Trojans also targeted Gauchos senior outside hitter Jeff Menzel in an effort to neutralize his offensive talents.Senior setter and co-captain Riley McKibbin set the tone for the defense with a stiff block on Menzel on his first attempt.“Although he’s not that tall, he had a huge block on Menzel,” Ferguson said. “And with Riley being the shorter guy, it really got in his head.”The Trojans continued the effort with strong serving from Troy.“Murphy did a great job serving him,” Ferguson said. “He made it tough for him to pass and that made it difficult for him to attack.”The Trojans outdug the Gauchos 29-21 and outblocked them 11-6. Freshman libero Henry Cassiday continued his impressive inaugural season, tallying nine digs.Ferguson, however, was not impressed by his team’s defensive execution.“We didn’t dig as well as we could have,” Ferguson said. “We missed about seven opportunities that I thought were easy plays, but we were a little bit out of position or made a wrong move. Just something to keep an eye on.”last_img read more

Arnett Gardens oppose W Connection in CFU Champs

first_imgArnett Gardens FC will face Trinidad and Tobago’s W Connection FC in a Caribbean Football Union (CFU) Club Championship semi-final stage match at the Stade Sylvio Cator in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, today, starting at 4:30 p.m. Having won Group Four with a maximum nine points last month, the Jerome Waite-coached Arnett will face a stern test against W Connection. Michaelous Martin scored four times in the group stage in the Dominican Republic while Kemal Malcolm found the back of the net three times. When the teams last met in the CFU tournament in 2002, W Connection defeated Arnett in the final. Today’s second semi-final will be between Haiti’s Don Bosco FC and Trinidad and Tobago’s Central FC. The final will be played on Sunday, with the winners advancing to the 2016-17 CONCACAF Champions League.last_img read more

Mike Myers on his new book Canada and his relationship with his

first_imgAt his home in New York, Canadian comedy star Mike Myers has a map of North America on the wall so his three young children can learn about his roots.“Each state is its own colour and Canada is just this pink blob,” he says. “I’ve taken to, as best I can, draw the provinces on with a magic marker and go, ‘This is where dad is from.’”Despite having lived outside of Canada for 33 years, the 53-year-old Toronto native says he thinks about the country “every day,” has referenced it in his work, and often travels here to visit his mother and brothers. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Advertisement So when Penguin Random House asked if he’d like to write a book on his relationship with his home and native land to commemorate its 150th birthday, he thought: “I guess in a weird way, I’ve sort of been writing a book for 53 years, collecting thoughts and whatnot.”“Canada,” on shelves now, is a treasure trove of all things Canuck as Myers documents his life and offers humorous and thoughtful reflections on the country — from its history to its pop culture and unique brands.Growing up in the Toronto suburbs of North York and Scarborough, as the youngest of three boys with English parents, Myers writes that he loved soccer, the Toronto Maple Leafs, heavy metal and punk music.Myers went on to act in commercials and a couple of Canadian TV series, including “The Littlest Hobo,” before getting his start in standup and improv comedy.It was while at Second City Toronto that he got a call from fellow Canadian Lorne Michaels to be a featured performer and writer on “Saturday Night Live.” There, he introduced viewers to his “Wayne’s World” character Wayne Campbell, a rock lover with a distinctly Canadian accent that Myers couldn’t shake.“Kevin Nealon used to make fun of me all the time,” says Myers. “Every sentence started with ‘In Canada?’ and always ended with ‘Sorry.’ He had an impression of me for two years. I didn’t know he had it and I busted him on it. I was like, ‘God, have I been reduced to, ‘In Canada? Sorry.’“People accuse me of, ‘You really enjoy being Canadian?’ I said, ‘Why not? Why shouldn’t I enjoy being Canadian? What’s not to enjoy?’”Myers has gone on to inject Canadian-isms into several of his projects over the years, including the “Wayne’s World” movies as well as his “Austin Powers” characters.“I did on ‘Saturday Night Live’ as well,” he says. “It was just something that you can’t help.“Canada has shaped me and, as I say in the book, I’d be nowhere without it.”Living outside of Canada, Myers says he’s come to realize the country has a sense of morbidity that’s reflected in films like the bus-crash drama “The Sweet Hereafter” and in names of organizations like the War Amps, the Grey Cup and the Hospital for Sick Children.“I was like, ‘Yeah, War Amps,’” he says, recalling a conversation with an American, “and it was like, ‘You mean amputees?’ ‘Oh wow, yeah, I never really thought about it.’”Myers also writes how Canada has struggled with its identity and self-image over the years.“I think Canadians really know who they are. They may not know why we are,” he says.But he’s hopeful that will change under the government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.“This election to me was very heartening that I think we may have found why we are, which is we’re a collection of progressive ideals,” says Myers, who can next be seen in the film “Terminal.”“That’s why I’m so hopeful with Prime Minister Trudeau, the junior, as I was a fan of Pierre Trudeau during that period of time from ’67 to ’76.”Myers met Trudeau in March at the White House state dinner and says he feels he can “continue the eloquence, continue to elevate the conversation” in the tradition of his father.“We are poised to be the future,” says Myers, “a high literacy rate, low crime rate, just a collective understanding of inclusion.“Hopefully he’ll continue to level the playing field so that the strivers in Canada, the people that need to make and innovate — should you be a working person or whatever, your situation is made less relevant and your acumen, talent, innovation more relevant.”Myers says he would “love” to do a documentary based on the book. And he’d “happily” move back to Canada some day, but not while his children are still young and in school.For now, he has his map — and his accent — to inform little Spike, Sunday and Paulina about his Canadian heritage.“Spike will make fun of my accent, which is hilarious because he has a little bit of a New York accent,” says Myers. “He’ll talk about, ‘Yeah, I love the Mutant Ninja Turtles, they live in the soo-wah.’”“It is funny, though, because all the kids shows, like ‘PAW Patrol,’ were all voiced in Canada. So it’s like, ‘We got to get to the lookout,’” adds Myers, putting on a thick Canadian accent.“I said, ‘That’s how dada talks.’”WRITTEN BY Victoria Ahearn Twitter Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisementlast_img read more