Majority support small charities but less than half can name one

first_img Tagged with: Research / statistics small charities  407 total views,  2 views today Melanie May | 20 June 2019 | News Majority support small charities but less than half can name one Two thirds (67%) of people in the UK think small charities have a positive impact on their local community according to CAF research released during this year’s Small Charity Week.However, less people think this is the case both nationally and internationally, Charities Aid Foundation’s findings show, and less than half – 41% – of people could name at least one small charity when asked.According to the research, 71% of people in the UK say they have helped a small charity at some point, whether through donating money, sponsoring, fundraising, volunteering or giving goods away, such as to a charity shop.It also shows that 64% of people are likely donate money to a small charity in the future, whilst 66% are likely to give goods, and that older generations are likelier to give goods to small charities, whilst 16-24 year olds are more likely than average to volunteer their time.Tessa Tyler Todd, Policy and Public Affairs Manager at Small Charities Coalition commented:“It’s great that a majority of the public is likely to support small charities in the future and view their impact as positive. Having said that, it’s clear that we need to raise more awareness.”“Raising awareness of small charities will ensure that more can have an impact on people’s lives. The time to do that is now; Small Charity Week is the ideal time to support these relationships.”The research was conducted by YouGov, which surveyed 1,096 adults from 20-26 May online. Advertisementcenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis13  408 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis13 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

Donegal born nurse is new INMO president

first_img Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Homepage BannerNews Twitter Facebook Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Google+ A Donegal native has been elected President of the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation.Karen McGowan was born and raised on Arranmore Island, and is a native irish speaker.She trained at DCU, she has spent her career to date at Beaumont Hospital in Dublin, now working as an advanced nurse practitioner in the hospital’s emergency department.Karen takes over from outgoing INMO President, Martina Harkin-Kelly, also from Donegal. WhatsApp Community Enhancement Programme open for applications INMO statement in full -Karen McGowan, an advanced nurse practitioner in Beaumont Hospital, has been elected President of the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation. McGowan was born and raised on Arranmore – an island off the west coast of Donegal. She was inspired to become a nurse at the age of six, after seeing the care provided to her father when he was hospitalised. Trained at DCU, she has stayed at Beaumont throughout her career, now working as an advanced nurse practitioner in the hospital’s emergency department. She has been an INMO rep in the workplace and has been on the union’s Executive Council for four years. She is also a native Irish speaker. Karen takes over from outgoing INMO President, Martina Harkin-Kelly, also from Donegal. She will be supported in her work by Eilish Fitzgerald (1st Vice President) and Kathryn Courtney (2nd Vice President). Incoming INMO President, Karen McGowan, said: “I want to thank my predecessor, Martina Harkin-Kelly, for her incredible work over the past years. “I am truly honoured to become the INMO’s President – especially during this unprecedented time in the health service.“I always wanted to be a nurse. When I was young, my father was very sick and spent a long period in hospital in Galway. As a six year old, I saw the expert care provided by the nurses. It left a lifelong impression on me. “Working as a frontline emergency nurse, I’ve seen the incredible work my colleagues do. I’ve also seen how the health system lets them down, which is why I have always been an active, determined INMO member. “I am so proud of the role that nurses and midwives have played during the pandemic and will work to the best of my abilities to represent them.” INMO General Secretary, Phil Ní Sheaghdha, said: “Our professions are lucky to have Karen at the helm of our Executive Council. She is an experienced nurse and a dedicated trade unionist. She will be ably supported by Eilish and Kathryn. I look forward to working with them over the coming years. “I would also like to thank outgoing president, Martina Harkin-Kelly, for her dedicated work over the past four years. Martina was president when I took over as General Secretary, and I am personally grateful to her support, guidance and work over an exceptionally busy period, which included the second strike in our history and an unprecedented pandemic.”  Google+ Pinterest Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Twitter Donegal born nurse is new INMO president WhatsApp Previous articleCovid-19 test centre needed in Inishowen – DohertyNext articleFishermen need a fairer Penalty Points regime – Jordan News Highland Pinterest Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme By News Highland – October 12, 2020 Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens furtherlast_img read more