Vuk’uzenzele: How to start a business in South Africa

first_imgYou have a great business idea, but how do you make it a reality? As part of our Vuk’uzenzele series, we will look at how ordinary South Africans can play their part and use their entrepreneurial skills to not only better their lives, but also the lives of people around them. In this infographic, we guide you through the process of starting your own business.Click to view larger imagelast_img

VFD and markets were top of mind at 2016 Beef Expo

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In the barns, under the viaduct and on the trade show floor of the 2016 Ohio Beef Expo, two topics were dominating conversations between cattle producers. One of those topics was the new Veterinary Feed Directive, which goes into effect on January 1st of next year, the other was the declining market prices. The Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins has more.last_img

How Recent Changes to Twitter’s Terms of Service Might Hurt Academic Research

first_imgTags:#NYT#twitter#web The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos audrey watters There is a lot to be learned from our tweets. Laugh if you will. Go ahead. But Twitter has become an important historical and cultural record. It’s a site for real-time news and information, to be sure. The stuff of history with a capital H. Politics. Natural disasters. Revolution. It’s a site that records our cultural history as well (is that history with a lower case H?). Ashton Kutcher. Charlie Sheen. The Oscars. Lower case or capital H – these 140 character exchanges have created an invaluable record for researchers looking at history, politics, literature, sociology. Such was the argument that Twitter made when the startup donated its archives to the Library of Congress. Tweets are important. They should be preserved, archived and accessible to scholars.But Twitter’s recent announcement that it was no longer granting whitelisting requests and that it would no longer allow redistribution of content will have huge consequences on scholars’ ability to conduct their research, as they will no longer have the ability to collect or export datasets for analysis. No Exceptions, Even for ScholarsThat’s the news that 140kit just had to break to its users. 140kit is an extension of the Web Ecology Project, a project that grew out of work at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School and one of the very first research efforts into the cultural and political influence as expressed via Twitter. The group’s research into Twitter’s role in the 2009 elections in Iran was, in fact, one of the very first looks into how Twitter may both shape and reflect social and political upheaval.140kit offered its Twitter datasets to other scholars for their own research. By no means a full or complete scraping of Twitter data, this information that the project had collected was still made available for download (for free) to researchers. But no longer.As part of the new Twitter terms of service, 140kit like other organizations can no longer offer exports of Twitter data for any purposes – whether that’s for profit or non-profit, whether that’s for developers or scholars. You could be writing the next killer app. Or you could be working on the final chapter of your PhD dissertation. (And let me interject right here and say that having your access to research data shut down as a PhD student is beyond devastating.) It doesn’t matter. Exporting Tweets now violates the TOS.Shutting Off Researchers’ Access to DataThese changes to Twitter’s TOS mean that 140kit, as a service, can no longer provide its datasets wholesale, even for academic purposes. “For many of our users,” the group says, “this effectively shuts them out of the ability to research the platform.”140kit has come to an agreement with Twitter, which according to Managing Director of the Web Ecology Project Devin Gaffney, means that some data will still be accessible to scholars. But not all the data. Rather than giving scholars the ability to download a particular dataset, 140kit will be able to offer researchers access to 140kit’s analytics. That’s not the same as having complete access, but as an academic group, it does sound as though 140kit will be as amenable as possible to scholars’ needs and be willing to consider what sorts of analyses people need in order to complete their projects.Nonetheless, Twitter’s changing Terms of Service, without exception to scholars, creates an obstacle to research. “This decision is almost certainly going to shut some researchers out,” says Gaffney. “Its a shame because Twitter’s clearly thinking about money and operational stability, which are necessary, but they aren’t considering the myriad number of PhD students that basically just lost their work, or the researchers that were close to saying something meaningful and now have no way to do it.” Gaffney says he sees a “rocky future” ahead for scholarship based on Twitter and says he hopes that the agreement he’s made with Twitter “will last enough time for people to actually continue doing work until whatever comes next.” Related Posts center_img Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

Demand for Cooling Is Spiraling Upward

first_imgBetter approaches are possibleRefrigeration has a crucial role to play in the world’s supply of food, a third of which is now wasted after harvest, the article said. Cutting food waste by half would be enough to feed 800 million people, but almost all of the money spent on agriculture research is about increasing yields, not making refrigeration more efficient and more available.More research and applied research would help. Better building designs, for example, would reduce cooling loads and cut the need for air conditioning. Toby Peters, visiting professor of power and the cold economy at the University of Birmingham, suggested cheaper off-peak renewable energy could be used to make ice at night and cool buildings the next day. “We store heat,” he said. “Why aren’t we storing cold?”(That’s exactly the approach adopted experimentally in Boothbay Harbor, Maine, where thermal energy storage units called “Ice Bears” produce ice at night, and release the cold during the day, according to The Boothbay Register.)Other promising ideas include finding a way to capture the cold used to transport liquified natural gas, currently dumped at sea.“We just need to think about cold differently,” Peters told The Guardian. “Because solving cold, really doing it smarter, would actually do more to help the world meet its climate-change targets than almost anything else I can think of.” The planet’s growing appetite for air conditioning and refrigeration is creating a surge in energy consumption that by mid-century will overtake the amount of power used for heating while making global warming worse, a published report says. In a series of news stories, The Guardian reports that the demand for cooling is going up steeply as a result of rising global temperatures and an expanding middle class that can afford to stay comfortable.By the year 2100, power consumption for cooling is expected to be 33 times what it is now. Already, the U.S., with 4.5% of the world’s population, uses more energy for air conditioning that the rest of the world combined, a related report said. The U.S. (population 318 million) uses more energy for cooling than Africa (with a population of more than 1 billion) uses for everything.“Cold has become a hugely significant — yet almost unsung — part of our energy footprint,” said Nick Winser, who heads a technology and innovation center in the UK. “We know the energy landscape is going to be very different in the near future. We need to see cold’s place in it; start thinking of heat and cold as parts of one integrated system.” Staying cool is a hot business, and full or risksCiting Losing Our Cool, a book by Stan Cox, the report notes the demand for air conditioners is surging everywhere, but particularly in Asia. Chinese shoppers took home 50 million air conditioning units in 2010, and the proportion of Chinese homes with refrigerators went from just 7% in 1995 to 95% in 2007.It’s not just AC units and the kitchen fridge: many medicines must be chilled, and a variety of industries, such as steel, chemicals, and plastics, all rely on some type of refrigeration. Huge data centers that handle internet traffic and cloud computing must be kept refrigerated.Those trucks that haul refrigerated food? “According to a report by the energy consultancy E4tech,” The Guardian reported, “the small diesel-powered fridges on food trailers emit nearly 30 times more harmful particulate matter and six times more nitrogen oxides than the engine that powers the trucks.Mechanical refrigeration needs both electricity and chemical refrigerants with a high global warming potential. Three-quarters of the electricity used for air conditioning and refrigeration is generated by fossil fuels, the report says, and the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants that are commonly used are 4,000 times more potent as greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. Refrigerant leaks and energy use for cooling already account for about 10% of global CO2 emissions already.Rising temperatures globally are making the problem worse. Parts of the Persian Gulf will be too hot for human habitation by the end of the century if carbon dioxide emissions continue at their current rate, the Associated Press says. The Greenland ice sheet is now one of the biggest chunks of melting ice on the planet, The New York Times says in an article.last_img read more

Joshua Pacio-Hayato Suzuki rematch ‘a 50-50 bout,’ says Filipino veteran Rene Catalan

first_imgSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion LATEST STORIES MOST READ Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Photo from ONE ChampionshipVeteran Filipino fighter Rene Catalan thinks the ONE strawweight world title is up for grabs when his compatriot Joshua Pacio defends his crown for the first time in a rematch with Japanese challenger Hayato Suzuki next month.Pacio and Suzuki will headline the ONE: Eternal Glory event at Istora Senayan in Jakarta, Indonesia on January 19.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments Lacson: 2019 budget delay due to P75-B House ‘insertion’center_img “This is a 50-50 bout. As long as Pacio can keep the match off the ground, he has a big chance to win. We all know Suzuki is experienced on the mat, and he already beat Pacio by doing just that in their first bout,” Catalan said.Suzuki got the better of Pacio in their first bout, submitting the Team Lakay standout with a rear-naked choke in the first round back in August 2017.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefCatalan though, said Pacio is a different fighter since that loss.“But Pacio has improved a lot, and he has more experience in grappling now. I think he can already cope up with Suzuki if it goes to the ground. Suzuki has to persevere on taking the fight to the canvas if he wants to win,” Catalan said. LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue Edward Kelly promoted to Brazilian jiu-jitsu blue belt “Hayato Suzuki has the experience, and he knows the art of war. But Pacio is consistently growing. He has the talent and the skill set to prove that he is the more versatile fighter between them,” he added. “The challenger has already beaten Pacio in the past, but he has to work twice as hard because Pacio has evolved so much since his loss to Suzuki.”The 22-year-old Pacio, who beat Yoshitaka Naito in their second encounter three months ago to win the belt, is also putting his four-fight winning streak on the line.“Suzuki could be the most difficult opponent for Pacio in the strawweight division, but Pacio is a different fighter every single time he steps into the cage,” Catalan said.“If Suzuki wants to win, he shouldn’t blink an eye because Pacio will make him pay for every mistake he commits in the fight.”ADVERTISEMENT Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionlast_img read more