Police: California woman impersonated social worker to try and kidnap newborn

first_imgKABC-TV(SANTA ANA, Calif.) — Police have arrested a woman who allegedly impersonated a social worker in an apparent effort to kidnap a California woman’s newborn child.Officers arrested the woman on suspicion of kidnapping after a mom said she showed up to her home in Santa Ana, California, on Friday morning and claimed she was there to take her 1-week-old child into protective custody, authorities said. She allegedly identified herself as a social worker named Mayella Ortega, but she refused to offer any credentials to confirm her identity, according to police. She allegedly threatened to call the sheriff’s department if the victim did not surrender the baby.“I told her if the sheriff comes and he has to arrest me, then he can arrest me. But I am not going to give you my child,” the mother, who wishes to remain anonymous, told ABC’s Los Angeles station KABC-TV.The mom said she offered to go with the woman to the police department, but the woman said there wasn’t room in the vehicle for the mother and quickly left the scene, a spokesperson for the Santa Ana Police Department said.Social workers are typically required to show credentials identifying themselves as government employees.Investigators with the Santa Ana Police Department said a 38-year-old Hispanic female had been arrested in connection with the case, but it declined to release her name or booking photo.The suspect turned herself in following the release of video that identified her as a person of interest, police said.Local detectives are now working in conjunction with the Los Angeles and San Bernardino County sheriff’s departments on “possibly related investigations,” according to police.Police announced the suspect’s arrest on Saturday morning, saying she’d been booked as part of an investigation by homicide detectives and the Orange County District Attorney’s Office.She reportedly told police that the situation was a misunderstanding.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Asia stocks sink, Dow confirms bear market after US bans Europe travel on virus

first_imgTokyo’s benchmark Nikkei was down 5.42 percent or 1,051.88 points to 18,364.18, while the broader Topix was down 5.06 percent or 70.15 points to 1,314.97 in the hour after Trump’s address.Australia’s ASX was down 5.4 percent, while Hong Kong tumbled three percent at the open. Read also: To buy it or not: Retail investors are torn amid volatile stock marketThe news also sent the yen higher, with the safe haven currency gaining as uncertainty continues. The dollar fetched 103.63 yen by 0130 GMT, from 104.57 yen in early Asian trade. Stock markets tumbled Thursday after US President Donald Trump announced a 30-day ban on travel to the United States from Europe over the coronavirus.Asian markets were already a sea of red at the open, with traders taking their lead from a global rout as the World Health Organization declared the spread of the new virus was officially a pandemic.But Trump’s announcement of the 30-day ban, which excludes Britain, caused further selling, despite a series of measures intended to ease the financial pain of the outbreak, which has paralysed travel and hit businesses around the world. “Trump travel ban: sell, sell, sell is being heard across dealing rooms in Asia,” wrote Stephen Innes, global chief markets strategist at AxiCorp.”Travel restrictions equal slower global economic activity, so if you need any more coaxing to sell… after a massively negative signal from overnight trading in US markets, it just fell in your lap,” he added.The losses followed another brutal session on the US markets, with wave after wave of bad news, including Hilton withdrawing its earnings forecast and Boeing saying it would suspend most hiring and overtime pay.The coronavirus outbreak has left virtually no sector untouched, though travel and tourism have been particularly hard-hit as countries institute travel bans and quarantine requirements.’Markets crying out’The Dow Jones Industrial Index plunged around 1,465 points, or 5.9 percent, to 23,553.22 on Wednesday, in a bruising session that left the index more than 20 percent below its peak, making it a bear market.Leading stock markets in Europe also retreated, including the FTSE 100 which dropped 1.4 percent despite the Bank of England slashing its key interest rate to a record low and the government pledging $39 billion of fiscal stimulus.Analysts said markets were struggling under the weight of twin crises: the burgeoning coronavirus outbreak and an oil price war.Read also: Disappearing act: Market braces for volatile March after $2.4b vanishes in a weekOil prices also fell sharply after Trump’s comments, plunging more than five percent.The oil market was already under pressure after Saudi Arabia and Gulf partner UAE stepped up a price war with plans to flood the global markets.The move is the latest escalation of a fight among oil producers after Russia balked at an OPEC-backed plan to cut production in response to lost demand from the coronavirus.”The virus itself continues to spread in Europe and the US, meaning more extensive containment measures are likely, which will weigh further on global growth,” said Tapas Strickland, senior analyst at National Australia Bank.”Markets are crying out for a co-ordinated response to COVID-19 headwinds and a lack of concrete US policy action is rattling markets,” he said.Trump’s address included several measures intended to ease the financial burden particularly for small business, including payroll tax relief and deferred tax payments.But the measures did not appear to be enough to convince investors, though Innes said the stepped up US action could herald “an avalanche of global fiscal action across the board” that might cheer markets eventually.Topics :last_img read more

South Africa denies Fifa was paid World Cup bribe

first_imgSouth African officials have dismissed allegations by US investigators that a $10m (£6.5m) bribe was organised for Fifa officials to host the 2010 World Cup.There had been a “clean audit report” at the end of the World Cup, a government minister said.A football official added that the bid was run by “men of integrity”, including the late Nelson Mandela.South Africa was the first African nation to host the World Cup.Fifa, the world football governing body, chose it ahead of Morocco.’Don’t panic’The South African government promised to pay $10m to former Fifa vice-president Jack Warner and his co-conspirators in exchange for winning the right to host the tournament, an FBI indictment alleges. The indictment later states that the South Africans “were unable to arrange for the payment to be made directly from government funds” so instead the $10m was sent through Fifa using funds that would otherwise have gone to South Africa to support the World Cup.In the South African government’s first response to the allegation, Jeff Radebe, a minister in the president’s office, said that leading accounting firm Ernest & Young had given South Africa a “clean audit report” at the end of the World Cup.Sports Minister Fikile Mbalula said South Africa would ask the US for the indictment through diplomatic channels in order “to establish the basis on which the allegations are being made as this has a potential of tarnishing the name and people of our country globally and put into question the competence of our nation in organising mega events”.The South Africa Football Association (Safa) said the allegation was “baseless” and “untested”.”No need to press any panic button regarding the Fifa 2010 World Cup. Terrible thumb-sucking from individual making those wild allegations,” its spokesman Dominic Chimhavi said in a tweet. Mr Warner said on Wednesday that he was innocent of any charges.He handed himself over to police in his home nation of Trinidad and Tobago and spent the night in prison after delays in processing his $395,000 bail.Fifa announced a provisional ban from football-related activity on 11 of the 14 people who were charged by the US authorities of racketeering, fraud and money laundering.But it said the election on Friday – in which Fifa president Sepp Blatter is seeking a fifth term – would go ahead.Mr Blatter, who has not been named in the investigations, issued a statement on the US case, saying: “Such misconduct has no place in football and we will ensure that those who engage in it are put out of the game.” Swiss prosecutors have also opened a separate investigation into the bidding process for the World Cup tournaments in 2018 in Russia and 2022 in Qatar.Swiss police said they would question 10 Fifa executive committee members who participated in the votes that selected Russia and Qatar in December 2010.last_img read more