Freddie Mac: What’s Influencing Housing Affordability Now?

first_img Freddie Mac HOUSING mortgage 2017-10-03 Nicole Casperson Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Freddie Mac: What’s Influencing Housing Affordability Now?  Print This Post Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Nicole Casperson is the Associate Editor of DS News and MReport. She graduated from Texas Tech University where she received her M.A. in Mass Communications and her B.A. in Journalism. Casperson previously worked as a graduate teaching instructor at Texas Tech’s College of Media and Communications. Her thesis will be published by the International Communication Association this fall. To contact Casperson, e-mail: [email protected] Share Save Tagged with: Freddie Mac HOUSING mortgage The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Freddie Mac: What’s Influencing Housing Affordability Now? Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Related Articles in Daily Dose, Featured, Headlinescenter_img In a recent report by Freddie Mac, the relative influence of regulatory and geographic constraints on housing affordability was examined, discovering that the restrictive land use of cities and metropolitan areas have reduced affordability.According to the GSE’s September Insights report, many cities geographic constraints have had a greater impact on housing costs. And while regulatory reform can help moderate housing costs, “geographic constraints are permanent and limit the impact of regulatory relief.”The insights also discovered that house prices are 2.4 times higher than in the non-geographically constrained group, and the house price to income ratio is twice as high. Meanwhile, increases in demand cannot produce more housing, “thus prices must adjust by a larger amount.”In addition, the homeownership rate in the geographically constrained group, which includes cities like San Francisco, New York, and Chicago, “is only 56 percent compared to 64 percent in both moderately constrained and non-geographically constrained areas.”Sean Becketti, Chief Economist, Freddie Mac said a thought experiment can illustrate the impact of regulatory relief and the limits on that relief in a city that also is constrained by geography.“Imagine that San Francisco’s land use regulations were relaxed significantly,” Becketti said. “The ensuing reduction in house values would encourage migration to San Francisco, but the city’s geographic constraints guarantee that housing would still be expensive despite the reduction in regulation.”“And, over time, existing homeowners would find it more and more in their economic interest to lobby for the restoration of stricter regulations,” Becketti added. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago About Author: Nicole Casperson Previous: Unraveling the Equifax Data Breach Next: Capitalizing on Housing Market Growth Sign up for DS News Daily Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago October 3, 2017 1,488 Views Subscribelast_img read more

Coronavirus live updates: Fauci calls vaccine rollout ‘bittersweet’

first_imgOvidiu Dugulan/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, IVAN PEREIRA and ERIN SCHUMAKER, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now infected more than 72.8 million people and killed over 1.6 million worldwide, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University.Here’s how the news is developing Tuesday. All times Eastern:Dec 15, 9:59 amKentucky doctor who was among 1st to be vaccinated warns against ‘false sense of security’A Kentucky doctor who was among the first Americans to receive a COVID-19 vaccine outside a clinical trial this week encouraged others to get immunized as soon as possible but also warned against any “false sense of security.”Dr. Valerie Briones-Pryor, who primarily works with hospitalized COVID-19 patients at University of Louisville Health in Kentucky’s largest city, said she was elated to find out that she would be one of the first five Americans to receive the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, which was authorized for emergency use in the United States last week.“I tear up just thinking about it because I finally felt like we had something, that we had one leg up on this nasty virus that doesn’t care, that wants to hurt everybody, hurt my loved ones,” Briones-Pryor told “Start Here,” ABC News’ daily news podcast.Briones-Pryor said she feels fine and immediately returned to work after receiving the shot on Monday but is continuing to practice public health measures.“Because I know that the rest of the community and my colleagues still haven’t received the vaccine yet, my patients haven’t received the vaccine yet, the more important it is that I stay vigilant about masking, social distancing, washing my hands and not being cavalier with what I do,” she said. “Just because we have the vaccine, we still have to do the right thing.”“You still want to set an example for others, because there’s a false sense of security that I’m vaccinated,” she added. “But I can still carry things around.”Dec 15, 8:55 amNurse and single mom becomes first in New Jersey to get vaccineMaritza Beniquez celebrated her birthday Tuesday by becoming the first person in New Jersey to receive a COVID-19 vaccine outside of a clinical trial.Beniquez, a nurse at University Hospital in Newark who is a single mother and first-generation Puerto Rican, clasped her hands in prayer as she was administered the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine on live television.“Thank you, God!” she said. “I’m very excited. This moment means everything.”Dec 15, 8:19 amFauci calls vaccine rollout ‘bittersweet,’ saying, ‘we still have a struggle ahead’Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, said the rollout of COVID-19 vaccine doses across the country is “bittersweet” because “we still have a struggle ahead of us.”“We are still in a terrible situation with the numbers … the deaths, the hospitalizations, the number of cases,” Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos in an interview Tuesday on Good Morning America.“And yet, we’re really now starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel that is going to ultimately get us through this. We know we’re going to be able to put this behind us,” he added. “But in the meantime, we still have a struggle ahead of us. So we’ve got to get people vaccinated as quickly and as expeditiously as we possibly can.”Fauci said he believes 75% to 80% of the U.S. population will need to be vaccinated in order to achieve a “herd immunity” against the novel coronavirus. Until then, he said, “we have to adhere to the public health measures in order to blunt the acceleration of these terrible numbers that we hear everyday.”Fauci, who is a key member of the current White House coronavirus task force, said the speed with which the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine was developed and authorized “was not at all at the sacrifice of safety,” but rather is “the reflection of extraordinary advances in the science of vaccine platform technology.”“People are understandably skeptical about the speed,” he added, “but we have to keep emphasizing, speed means the science was extraordinary that got us here.”Fauci, who will stay on in his role and be a chief medical adviser on the coronavirus pandemic in President-elect Joe Biden’s incoming administration, said he believes both Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris should get vaccinated as soon as possible.“For security reasons, I really feel strongly that we should get them vaccinated as soon as we possibly can,” he said. “You want him fully protected as he enters into the presidency in January, so that would be my strong recommendation.”When asked about whether he thinks President Donald Trump should be vaccinated, Fauci said he would recommend that Trump as well as Vice President Mike Pence get the shot.“You still want to protect people who are, you know, very important to our country right now,” he said. “Even though the president himself was infected and he has likely antibodies that likely would be protective, we’re not sure how long that protection lasts. So to be doubly sure, I would recommend that he get vaccinated as well as the Vice President.”Dec 15, 7:39 am‘No side effects for me,’ says nurse who was among first Americans to get vaccineThe New York nurse who was among the first in the nation to receive a COVID-19 vaccine outside of a clinical trial said she feels “great” so far and has “no side effects.”“I feel great,” Sandra Lindsay told ABC News’ Robin Roberts in an interview Tuesday on Good Morning America.“No pain, no feeling of tiredness, no malaise,” she added. “No muscle aches. No side effects for me.”Lindsay, a critical care nurse at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New York City, was administered the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine on live television Monday. She was the first person in the state of New York to get the shot outside of a clinical trial.“I volunteered,” she said. “I am a leader in the organization, and so I think it as incredibly important for me to lead by example like I do everyday.”Lindsay said she wanted “to send a message to people who might be on the fence that they should trust the science.” She said people who were initially hesitant about getting the vaccine, including some coworkers, have since reached out to tell her how much she inspired them.“The vaccine is safe. What is not safe is contracting COVID-19,” she said. “So that was my reason, and I hope that just continues to resonate with people.”Dec 15, 6:45 amSouth Africa tightens restrictions furtherSweeping new restrictions came into force across South Africa on Tuesday morning, as the country looks to curb a sharp rise in COVID-19 infections ahead of the holidays.All post-funeral gatherings are now prohibited nationwide. All other gatherings, including for religious purposes, are limited to a maximum of 100 people for indoor events and 250 people for outdoor events. The total number of people in a venue must not exceed 50% capacity.A national curfew has been extended and will now be from 11 p.m. to 4 a.m. The curfew will remain in full effect over the holidays. Bars and restaurants across the country must close by 10 p.m. so their employees can return home before curfew.Beaches along the country’s eastern coast and public parks in areas with the highest number of infections have been shuttered. Live music and performances have also been banned. Meanwhile, alcohol sales are now permitted only between Monday and Thursday at retail stores.South Africa, which has so far confirmed more than 866,000 total cases of COVID-19, has seen a spike in infections since the beginning of December. The number of reported cases has been recently hovering around 8,000 per day, up from from around 3,000 per day in November.“Given the rate at which new cases have grown over the last two weeks, there is every possibility that if we do not act urgently … the second wave will be more severe than the first wave,” South African President Cyril Ramaphosa said in a televised address Monday, while announcing the new rules.Dec 15, 5:51 amLondon to move to tightest COVID-19 restrictionsLondon and other parts of England will move into the country’s highest tier of COVID-19 restrictions amid rising infections, U.K. Health Secretary Matt Hancock announced Monday.The British capital, along with most of Essex and parts of Hertfordshire, will be moved from England’s “high alert” Tier 2 to the “very high” Tier 3 on Wednesday morning at 12 a.m.“Over the last three weeks we’ve seen very sharp exponential rises in the virus across London, Kent, parts of Essex and Hertfordshire,” Hancock said while announcing the decision in Parliament.Under the Tier 3 level of local restrictions, all hospitality venues including bars, cafes, pubs and restaurants must close except for takeout and delivery services. Sports fans also can’t attend events in stadiums. Indoor entertainment venues, such as bowling alleys, cinemas and theaters, must also remain shut. However, retail shops, gyms and hair salons can stay open.Londoners, who are already unable to mix indoors with people from other households under Tier 2, will now not be able to meet in private gardens or at most outdoor venues except with those within their household or bubble. They may meet up to six people in other outdoor spaces such as beaches, parks, public gardens and sports facilities.Hancock said a new variant of the novel coronavirus has been identified and “may be associated” with the rapid spread in southern England. London’s weekly case rate at 225 cases of COVID-19 per 100,000 people is currently the highest regional rate in the country.“We do not know the extent to which this is because of the new variant, but no matter its cause, we have to take swift and decisive action, which unfortunately is absolutely essential to control this deadly disease while the vaccines roll out,” he said.Although London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the decision was “incredibly disappointing for businesses who have suffered so much already,” he also acknowledged that “the virus is accelerating.”“It would be such a tragedy to lose even more people to this disease when the vaccine is now being rolled out across our city,” Khan said in a statement Monday evening. “We know from bitter experience that when cases start to rise quickly, it’s much better to act early, rather than too late. This is how we can avoid even tougher restrictions, for longer, further down the road.”Dec 15, 4:13 amUS reports over 193,000 new casesThere were 193,454 new cases of COVID-19 confirmed in the United States on Monday, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.It’s the 42nd straight day that the U.S. has reported over 100,000 newly diagnosed infections. Monday’s tally is less than the country’s all-time high of 231,775 new cases confirmed on Dec. 11, according to Johns Hopkins data.An additional 1,441 deaths from the disease were also registered nationwide on Monday, bringing the cumulative count past the 300,000 mark. Monday’s death toll is down from a peak of 3,300 fatalities on Dec. 11, according to Johns Hopkins data.A total of 16,519,628 people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 300,482 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins data. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C., and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.Much of the country was under lockdown by the end of March as the first wave of pandemic hit. By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up over the summer.The numbers lingered around 40,000 to 50,000 from mid-August through early October before surging again to record levels, crossing 100,000 for the first time on Nov. 4 and reaching 200,000 for the first time on Nov. 27.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Indonesia’s family resilience bill says housekeeping wife’s duty

first_imgTopics : “[…] I may violate the family resilience law. [When] the husband is at home and the wife is working in Papua then who will take care of the household, huh?” she tweeted.Hahahahah bisa2 aku melanggar UU Ketahanan Keluarga.Suami di rumah, istri kerja di Papua. Yg ngurus rumah tangga siapa hah??? 🤭 https://t.co/8pVjO1jQlU— Ligwina Hananto (@mrshananto) February 19, 2020Meanwhile, Indonesia Solidarity Party (PSI) executive Tsamara Amany tweeted her criticism through her account @TsamaraDKI on Wednesday, implying that it was not the government’s job to interfere in the private lives of couples.“The state is trying to control the households of its citizens. Now, the role of husbands and wives is intended to be arranged according to certain perspectives in law! There is no definite responsibility of a husband or wife. The duties of the two depend on their own agreement – not the country’s regulation,” she said.Negara mencoba ingin mengatur rumah tangga warga negara. Peran suami-istri kini hendak diatur menurut perspektif tertentu dalam perundangan! Tak ada kewajiban suami atau istri secara pasti. Kewajiban keduanya tergantung kesepakatan. Bukan aturan negara.https://t.co/Qdc8OpOgs9— Tsamara Amany (@TsamaraDKI) February 19, 2020The family resilience bill was initiated by five politicians from several factions in the House. Three of them are women.They are Ledia Hanifa and Netty Prasetiyana, both from the Islam-based Prosperous Justice Party (PKS), Endang Maria Astuti from the Golkar Party, Sodik Mudjahid from the Gerindra Party and Ali Taher from the National Mandate Party (PAN). Many Indonesians would agree that traditional households – which typically assign domestic roles based on gender, with the husband as the breadwinner and the wife in charge of household chores and children – should be a thing of the past.However, a draft bill on so-called family resilience, which has been floated at the House of Representatives, apparently wants to challenge the idea by bringing back the traditional way of managing households.Article 25 of the draft bill, a copy of which was obtained by The Jakarta Post, stipulates that husband and wives “are responsible for performing their individual roles in accordance with religious norms, social ethics and the prevailing laws”.center_img The article stipulates that only the husband has the obligation to be the breadwinner and to fulfill the family’s welfare and household needs, as well as to protect himself and the family from “mistreatment, exploitation and sexual deviation”.Point 3 of the article stipulates that housewives “are responsible for managing household affairs as best as possible” and to maintain the family’s unity, as well as to fulfill the rights and treat their husband and children well based on, among other factors, religious norms.The bill, one of the 50 bills listed as priority bills in the 2020 National Legislation Program (Prolegnas), has received criticism from the public, with many women calling it patriarchal in nature. Financial planner Ligwina Hananto criticized the bill through a post on her Twitter account @mrshananto.last_img read more