Weekend round-up: Hazard on Spurs, QPR boss defends Polter and hails Ingram

first_imgA recap of the action during a weekend when Chelsea and Brentford both won by convincing margins, QPR were held at home, while Fulham suffered defeat to Nottingham Forest…Chelsea enjoyed a resounding win on the south coastBournemouth 1 Chelsea 4 Match report  Hiddink reaction  Player ratings Action: Eden Hazard’s first Premier League goals in almost a year and three assists from Cesc Fabregas inspired Chelsea to victory.Reaction: Afterwards, Blues boss Guus Hiddink said he sensed Hazard was getting his sharpness back prior to the win at Bournemouth.Chelsea could have a big say in the title race, with both Tottenham and Leicester having to come to Stamford Bridge – and Hazard admitted the Blues players knew who they would prefer to see lift the Premier League trophy.Blues man of the match: Fabregas’ outstanding performance caught the eye in a strong attacking team display – click here to see how we rated the players.Matt Smith scored only his second goal of the season.Fulham 1 Nottingham Forest 3Match report  Jokanovic reaction  Action: Matt Smith’s first goal since August was not enough to spark a Fulham comeback as they paid for a poor first half at Craven Cottage.Reaction: After this latest defeat, Whites head coach Slavisa Jokanovic promised a summer rebuilding programme to end the glut of goals his Fulham side are conceding.Meanwhile, Forest’s interim boss Paul Williams said his side were finally getting their reward for their hard work – and explained what changes he had made to the side since taking over.Lasse Vibe scored in the Bees’ win at MK Dons.MK Dons 1 Brentford 4 Match report   Action: Brentford romped to a fifth win in six games as they came from behind to confirm MK Dons’ relegation.Grant Hall has been excellent for QPR this season.QPR 1 Reading 1Match report  Hasselbaink reaction  Player ratings  Action: Grant Hall scored his first goal for QPR but it was not enough to give them victory at Loftus Road.Reaction: Afterwards, Rangers manager Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink defended Sebastian Polter after the striker’s late miss and spoke about the kind of players QPR need to sign for next season.The Dutchman also singled out three of his players for praise, predicting goalkeeper Matt Ingram would go on to be a Premier League player.Rangers man of the match: Ingram looked confident on his home debut – click here to see how we think the other R’s players fared.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

This parking lot is weird. — Cadillac Ranch Cars (GC4K7Y3) — Geocache of the Week

first_imgContinue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog.If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, just fill out this form. Thanks!Share with your Friends:More The Cadillacs look even cooler in infra-red. Photo by geocacher hzoiGeocache Name:Cadillac Ranch Cars (GC4K7Y3)Difficulty/Terrain Rating:3/1.5Why this is the Geocache of the Week:When you set out on a geocaching adventure, you never know what you’re going to find. Of course we always hope it’s the geocache, but you could end up finding a place you never knew existed, another geocacher, a wild animal, or even—in this case—a few Cadillacs sticking up out of the ground. This art installation near Amarillo, Texas was created in 1974 and has been a must-see stop along Route 66 ever since. If you’re ever in the area, finding this geocache is a must. One thing to keep in mind: this piece of art is in danger of being removed due to visitors leaving their empty spray-paint cans behind. Do your part as a geocacher and CITO around the area. We all appreciate it!What the geocache owner, Scubafrogger, has to say:“I was inspired to place this Geocache from many visits on the way from Denton, TX to Sipapu New Mexico to compete in the State Double Disc Golf Tournament. We have been visiting this site since 2002 and nearly every year since. The first time we drove by on the way to New Mexico I spotted something odd in a farmers field. The drive down I-40 can get pretty boring so we made a quick U turn and had a great picture festival! We pulled up and had the place all to ourselves. I wondered who put this hear and why all covered in graffiti? VERY COOL though!”“I get tons of great pics and stories from the many distant travelers making the trek to world famous Cadillac Ranch! I love reading every one and pics are a huge bonus for me. Keep em coming!”What geocachers are saying:“Continuing our Route 66 journey through Texas – thank you so much for making our trip so enjoyable and for helping to make such lovely memories.” – The Platonas Two“Took a break from our travels west to look for this one. We had logged the virtual cache that was here a couple of years ago and we’re happy for a reason to stop again. Took a few minutes, but Mr CGof4 made the find. Thanks for the cache!” – crazygangof4“Really good location for a cache. Not many muggles out today so we was able to look some. This one was tricky. Took some looking. Sun was getting in eyes made it hard. Glad this cache was in a dry area and not the muddy part like some of the cars. Thanks for placing this cool cache.” – wastedspacePhotos:The Platonas Two hanging out with the cars.Geocacher Lookin’Good doing her part to CITO and keep the area clean. Good job!This valet is definitely not getting a tip. Photo by geocacher nukeworker What’s your favorite piece of art you’ve seen while geocaching? Tell us and post photos in the comments.center_img SharePrint RelatedMother of Father’s Day: Investigating The 3 Parts of Every GeocacheJune 21, 2015In “Community”Padlocks, RFID chips, and secret briefcases: an interview with a geocaching maniacMarch 12, 2019In “Geocaching Weekly Newsletter”Sometimes Geocaching Makes You Go… — Nuts (GC41D4C) — Geocache of the WeekOctober 10, 2013In “Community”last_img read more

How Recent Changes to Twitter’s Terms of Service Might Hurt Academic Research

first_imgTags:#NYT#twitter#web The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos audrey watters There is a lot to be learned from our tweets. Laugh if you will. Go ahead. But Twitter has become an important historical and cultural record. It’s a site for real-time news and information, to be sure. The stuff of history with a capital H. Politics. Natural disasters. Revolution. It’s a site that records our cultural history as well (is that history with a lower case H?). Ashton Kutcher. Charlie Sheen. The Oscars. Lower case or capital H – these 140 character exchanges have created an invaluable record for researchers looking at history, politics, literature, sociology. Such was the argument that Twitter made when the startup donated its archives to the Library of Congress. Tweets are important. They should be preserved, archived and accessible to scholars.But Twitter’s recent announcement that it was no longer granting whitelisting requests and that it would no longer allow redistribution of content will have huge consequences on scholars’ ability to conduct their research, as they will no longer have the ability to collect or export datasets for analysis. No Exceptions, Even for ScholarsThat’s the news that 140kit just had to break to its users. 140kit is an extension of the Web Ecology Project, a project that grew out of work at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School and one of the very first research efforts into the cultural and political influence as expressed via Twitter. The group’s research into Twitter’s role in the 2009 elections in Iran was, in fact, one of the very first looks into how Twitter may both shape and reflect social and political upheaval.140kit offered its Twitter datasets to other scholars for their own research. By no means a full or complete scraping of Twitter data, this information that the project had collected was still made available for download (for free) to researchers. But no longer.As part of the new Twitter terms of service, 140kit like other organizations can no longer offer exports of Twitter data for any purposes – whether that’s for profit or non-profit, whether that’s for developers or scholars. You could be writing the next killer app. Or you could be working on the final chapter of your PhD dissertation. (And let me interject right here and say that having your access to research data shut down as a PhD student is beyond devastating.) It doesn’t matter. Exporting Tweets now violates the TOS.Shutting Off Researchers’ Access to DataThese changes to Twitter’s TOS mean that 140kit, as a service, can no longer provide its datasets wholesale, even for academic purposes. “For many of our users,” the group says, “this effectively shuts them out of the ability to research the platform.”140kit has come to an agreement with Twitter, which according to Managing Director of the Web Ecology Project Devin Gaffney, means that some data will still be accessible to scholars. But not all the data. Rather than giving scholars the ability to download a particular dataset, 140kit will be able to offer researchers access to 140kit’s analytics. That’s not the same as having complete access, but as an academic group, it does sound as though 140kit will be as amenable as possible to scholars’ needs and be willing to consider what sorts of analyses people need in order to complete their projects.Nonetheless, Twitter’s changing Terms of Service, without exception to scholars, creates an obstacle to research. “This decision is almost certainly going to shut some researchers out,” says Gaffney. “Its a shame because Twitter’s clearly thinking about money and operational stability, which are necessary, but they aren’t considering the myriad number of PhD students that basically just lost their work, or the researchers that were close to saying something meaningful and now have no way to do it.” Gaffney says he sees a “rocky future” ahead for scholarship based on Twitter and says he hopes that the agreement he’s made with Twitter “will last enough time for people to actually continue doing work until whatever comes next.” Related Posts center_img Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

The Pretty Good House, Part 2

first_imgMore suggestions for a PGHDan Kolbert, builder and moderator, kicked it off by briefly recapping the results of the first discussion and the comments to Part 1 of this blog series. He clarified that, in his mind at least, the PGH is not meant to be a prescriptive measure for all climate zones (and that in fact he’s not really sure what it’s supposed to be at all), but that we should try to focus our discussion on our zone (Climate Zone 6) and to consider how other climates might relate. RELATED ARTICLES The Pretty Good HouseMartin’s Pretty Good House ManifestoThe Pretty Good House: A Better Building Standard?Regional Variations on the ‘Pretty Good House’Is the Pretty Good House the Next Big Thing?Is the Pretty Good House the Next Big Thing? Part 2Green Building for BeginnersWith many sharp minds in the room and no strong agenda, the discussion wandered around, and as usual there was no consensus on what the PGH metrics should be or even what the PGH concept really means. Good things came out of the discussion though, including the following ideas of what should be included in a Pretty Good House:Near net zero. Jason Peacock suggested this, and he practices what he preaches. He propsed that a PGH should have utility bills of no more than $500 to $700 a year, and that no house should be built without renewable energy systems as part of the mechanical mix.Zoned heating system to reduce the load. Jim Godbout, one of Maine’s premier plumbing and heating experts, says that one relatively inexpensive way to reduce demand on the heating system is to provide separate zones for different parts of the house. He said that if you are using a boiler, a popular choice in Maine, you can also use the boiler to heat domestic hot water — an approach that usually requires a boiler rated at 80,000 Btu/h or more. He says that in a tight, well-insulated house, the heat load could be reduced to 20,000 Btu per square foot per year or less, at which point electrically supplied heat can make sense — but you will need another heat source to supply domestic hot water.Mechanical ventilation should be a given. An HRV or ERV, or possibly an exhaust-only ventilation system, is required with the airtightness level expected of a PGH.At the previous discussion, Mike Pindell of I&S Insulation had suggested 2 ach50 as a reasonably easy target to hit; informal feedback seems to indicate that tighter levels may be preferred. Mike says, “We’re standing here in rarified air,” arguing about the difference between 1 and 2 ach50, when the vast majority of people out there are nowhere near these numbers. Is this a case of building nerds being nerdy, or are supertight blower door numbers really necessary?No fossil fuels. Phil Kaplan offers this concept, and has achieved it in his firm’s Bright Built Barn, which produces more power than it uses. Using no fossil fuels at all may be more than Pretty Good, so the suggestion was amended to “no fossil fuels burned on site.” Affordably sized grid-tied renewable energy system, here we come.Renovating vs. new construction. Dan states that until we get our heads around the concept of the PHG, let’s stick to new construction. Architect Liz Newman argues that in 50 years, 90% of the housing stock will be stock that exists now, so thinking about retrofits is vitally important. Margo Billings of Horizon Energy Services asks whether retrofits should meet the same standards as PGH specifications for new homes. Clearly this group is focused on retrofits, and further discussion about retrofits, when we get to it, will be interesting.Client concerns. Sam Zuckerman of Solaris says that we should bring the discussion back to the customers. Their concerns about achieving a reasonable return on their investment are something he hears about all the time when talking to people about energy upgrades and installations. Should the PGH specifications be a list of “Do this, don’t do that,” or should it be about giving the client the best house you can for the money they are willing to spend?On one hand, Dan relates a story about a leading green builder in New England, who tells customers: If you already have 500 square feet per person, I will not build you an addition.On the other hand, Bob Earnest of Spring Island Builders says, “If you can help people build a greener house than they would have otherwise, then yes — we should continue to encourage smaller footprints. But don’t run away from a house that’s bigger than you might prefer.  Each case has to stand on its own.  Every time we can make a house greener, or smaller, or better — that’s a win.”A house that uses little fuel will cost less to operate, allowing for a bigger mortgage, and energy incentives also make a difference in what homeowners can afford, so the cost vs. square foot debate is a moving target. Client education is a big part of this too; Dan suggests a Pretty Good House coloring book to help all parties visualize what is important.Energy-efficient assemblies. Wes Riley, an energy rater and consultant, suggests we follow the latest energy code requirements — specifically the 2012 IECC, which has some interesting changes over past iterations. As most of us are not yet aware of the upcoming changes, he says that there is going to be a move from insulation R-value to overall wall assembly U-factor, taking into account thermal bridging and window and door performance. Wes suggests that any house with a HERS performance rating of 40 or less is Pretty Good.Margo agrees that the tipping point is right around HERS 40; that’s where you start to see serious reductions in energy use. Wes says that the easiest thing you can do is to minimize thermal bridging; Sam agrees that it doesn’t cost a lot and makes a big difference in wall U-factors. Wes says that in the 2012 IECC, air leakage is also going to be a major factor.Tom Fullam points out that in any wall assembly you need to be aware of moisture management issues — there’s no sense in building a superinsulated house if it’s not going to be durable.Prescriptive vs. performance. Jim Godbout says that he recently went to a meeting of ten reputable builders — these are guys who are proud of the way they are building — and all ten were insulating in different ways: proof that prescriptive paths don’t work.Mike Pindell and Chris Corson agree that if the PGH is going to require high performance levels, the standard has to be performance-based. Chris, who recently built a house that “killed the Passivhaus standard,” says that PGH could be the beginning of a potential paradigm shift. Sam agrees, and says that there doesn’t need to be one solution with a ribbon around it; simply planting five ideas in someone’s head will make a big difference.Steve Konstantino, owner of Maine Green Building Supply (our gracious host and provider of delicious sausages and other snacks), thinks that including an energy model up front is very important, in addition to testing performance at the end of the project. The best response so far to the second question came from Shepard Bosworth, a builder: you get a Pretty Good Plaque. But I think there may be other good answers to both questions. Let’s hear them. What is truly important when designing and building a green home? Some of the many existing programs don’t go far enough, some are accused of going too far, and some just miss the mark. What should be included in a Pretty Good House?We had a pretty good turnout, 50 people or so, at the most recent building science discussion group, held each month at Maine Green Building Supply in Portland. Plugs were made for the upcoming Maine Indoor Air Quality conference and the NESEA conference in Boston. We did a quick round of self-introductions, and then we got down to business — Part 2 of the Pretty Good House discussion. What’s the point?At the end of the night, there seemed to be a few recurring questions:center_img Should you quantify the PGH, and if so, how? And what is the purpose of the PGH?last_img read more