Teaching children to love themselves

first_imgMany of the children come from disadvantaged backgrounds so Lovy encourages them to develop their self-love and to use this strength in their environment. Work with the mirror, using exercises from the Lovy book, promotes self-awareness and can help a child to deal with a negative self-image. Lovy is aimed at all children aged five to ten years.(Images: Lovy – Loves You)MEDIA CONTACTS • Dee Boehner Kidz2Kidz Trust+27 83 460 4449RELATED ARTICLES• Giving children a sense of pride• The right to dignity• Let’s learn and honour Children’s Act• Pupils get a lesson on dignity• Putting children’s rights firstCadine PillayAccording to life coach Annett Burmester, without knowing it, we often live what is expected of us and not what we truly want. We focus too much on others when it is important to understand our needs, fears and feelings, to recognise our beliefs and behaviour patterns.“What about your attitude towards yourself and your life?” This is the message Burmester wishes to convey to children with backgrounds that often demoralise them.Giving children a chanceOriginally from Germany, Burmester met Dee Boehner, founder of the Cape Town-based Kidz2Kidz Trust, in February 2010 while volunteering with the Santa Shoebox Project in the city.“I fell in love with Cape Town and the city gave me so much which I felt compelled to give back,” Burmester says.As a life coach, the main focus of Burmester’s work is teaching self-love, which is the most important inner strength for more happiness in life. She is also an illustrator, designer and author working on a book about self-love – a perfect mix to create a new project for the children in need.Boehner then proposed the creation of a short book to illustrate the idea of self-love. So Burmester wrote a story book with the character called Lovy, designed the Lovy toy and came up with the name which derives from “Loves You”.Born in South Africa, Lovy is the character portrayed as the hero in the books, and the figure is aimed at all children aged five to ten years to show them how loveable they are.The Lovy books contain a moral lesson, which will help the kids to become more aware of themselves.“It is a good way to allow them to start realising ‘that’s me’ and ‘I am important’,” Burmester says.The story has been written in three languages English, Afrikaans, Sesotho and isiXhosa. More Lovy books in different languages will be available in the future.In 2011 Lovy was run as a pilot project in the Western Cape and in 2012 launched successfully in Gauteng. The intention is to expand the Lovy project around the country.Burmester also holds follow-up sessions, where social workers sit in, with any child who needs additional coaching.Increasing self-esteem Burmester went on to develop Lovy as a special coaching project for children living in children’s homes and orphanages to help them to build their self-esteem and realise their potential. The project carries out group workshops using the Lovy Kit which comprises a Lovy book, a mirror and the cuddly toy called Lovy.“The Lovy toy is important because children need something to cuddle,” Burmester adds. “Having Lovy will give them a feeling of security and warmth. Lovy is like a friend who is always with them and listening to their feelings. They often own nothing, not even a toy.”The Lovy toys are made by seamstresses in the townships which provide opportunities for employment and empowerment.During the workshops Lovy shows children that they are loveable, unique and special. Work with the mirror, using exercises from the Lovy book, promotes self-awareness and can help a child to deal with a negative self-image.“Mirrors are often absent in children’s homes and orphanages. We use the mirror so that the children can say ‘I love me’ – using their very own name, looking into the mirror,” explains Burmester.“Nobody can take away their pain, but they will learn to love themselves and thus gain more and more self-confidence every day.”The mirrors are made from recycled materials by the children as part of the Art2Kidz Project to involve them creatively in the Lovy intiative.The right to be loved and respected“We all have the right to be loved and respected,” says Burmester. “We need to give these children a chance for a better and peaceful world. They are our future too.”Many of the children come from disadvantaged backgrounds so Lovy encourages them to develop their self-love and to use this strength in their environment.“These children have experienced more violence than luck or love in their young lives,” she says. “We show them how they can develop their love of self and use this strength in their environment.”Lovy is orange which is the colour for children as it symbolises joy and confidence. In colour therapy, the colour orange is used to help overcome psychological and mental exhaustion.“Its purpose is to bring more love and happiness into their lives as they are abandoned, afraid, unloved and hurt,” says Burmester. “They will learn to believe in themselves and live again. It will also teach them that we all have a great deal of love in ourselves and that there is nothing wrong with being an orphan.“It touches me again and again when I see how these children soak up Lovy’s message and how they integrate this into their lives.”The Lovy days coincide with 14 February, Valentine’s Day. They are celebrated in children’s homes and orphanages with workshops that share the message: “You are loveable, unique and special”.last_img read more

Early photogenic iceberg raises expectations for Newfoundlands season

first_imgST. JOHN’S, N.L. — This historic port city welcomed an unexpected early guest on Easter weekend: a sizable iceberg, a ridge of white framed between the hills of the Narrows leading into the city’s harbour.Visible from downtown, the photogenic ‘berg drew excited locals and tourists to trails along the city’s iconic Signal Hill on Sunday, and raised expectations for this year’s iceberg season.The ‘berg’s early arrival is a good sign for the lucrative industry that offers tourists a look at the frozen formations, most often seen drifting down the coast of the island from May through the summer months.Barry Rogers, whose Iceberg Quest Ocean Tours operates out of St. John’s and Twillingate off the island’s northeast coast, said there have already been upwards of 20 icebergs sighted in the Twillingate area, suggesting a rewarding few months ahead for iceberg chasers.“I’m very optimistic about this season now,” Rogers said. “It’s a darn good sign to have had this much ice around in our Twillingate area in particular.”The 2018 season brought relatively few ‘bergs close to areas with high tourist traffic, though local Facebook groups and Instagram pages documented sightings across Newfoundland’s coastal communities.Meteorologist Brian Walsh posted on Twitter that 2019 “should be a good tourist season for icebergs,” as wind patterns drive more of them closer to Newfoundland’s coast.Most of the ‘bergs floating down the east coast area known as Iceberg Alley come from Greenland after breaking off of 10,000-year-old glaciers and falling into the sea.Despite last year’s small showing, the island’s iceberg season has captured the word’s attention year after year, with striking images that show off the sheer scale of the icebergs against small boats and buildings.One towering iceberg drew a flood of onlookers to Ferryland, a town of about 500, in April 2017, and made headlines in global media including The New York Times, CNN, BBC, Time, The Guardian and Russia’s state-backed news channel.After being in business for over 10 years, Rogers said he doesn’t get tired showing off the beautiful natural phenomenon to tourists and locals who don’t seem to get weary of seeing the contours, changing light and reflections while out on the water. Some of the wonder comes from what’s left unseen, Rogers said, given that about 90 per cent of an iceberg’s mass is submerged under water.“You have to really let your imagination kick in to be able to think about that full volume,” Rogers said. “That intrigues a lot of people, the beautiful colourations and so on.”While onlookers gathered on land Sunday, St. John’s photographer Alick Tsui was down with Rogers and his team on the water for an up close and personal look at the floating spectacle.“From my estimate, the ‘Easter Berg’ is about 6 metres high and 60 metres in length. It is a beautiful flat tabular small berg,” Tsui wrote in a blog post.Tsui has shot many iceberg photos over the years but said he doesn’t tire of the chase — he was considering driving to Bonavista, about three hours up the coast, to shoot photos this weekend but was lucky enough to catch the St. John’s ‘berg by staying close to home.His iceberg chases have taken him up and down the island, and he said he recommends friends come to visit during iceberg season to catch the special sights known to arrive at many Newfoundlanders’ doorsteps.“In Twillingate two years ago, I sat down on a hill and watched an iceberg for three hours watching the boats pass by and seeing the waves cutting on the iceberg,” Tsui said.“If you are lucky enough you can see one of the icebergs that splits into little pieces and that will be amazing. The sound it made was so loud, I mean, you could never, never forget it.”Holly McKenzie-Sutter, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

New Programs And Partnerships Announced At Fifth Annual Health Matters Activation Summit

first_imgThe Clinton Health Matters Initiative (CHMI), an initiative of the Clinton Foundation, held its Fifth Annual Health Matters Activation Summit this week.The Summit brought together 450 leaders in healthcare, public policy, business, technology, education, and professional sports in an action-oriented dialogue on what’s working and what more can be done to improve the health and well-being of communities across the United States.The Summit, sponsored by Tenet Healthcare Corporation, included plenary discussions led by President Bill Clinton and Clinton Foundation President Donna Shalala on the quest for longevity and our rising death rates, addressing health disparities through technology and innovation, the inclusion of girls and women in sports to improve their health, and how communities and local organizations are driving and developing scalable solutions that are also best suited to meet local needs.“If we have community-based solutions that involve all stakeholders, we can make a lot of difference,” said President Bill Clinton. “We can’t forget that the shape these challenges take are different from community to community. That is what makes Health Matters’ work to make communities the centers of health innovation so important.”“The Health Matters Summit provides an opportunity for experts and key stakeholders across sectors to see the progress that is being made in the health community, to learn from one another, and to be inspired by one another,” said Clinton Foundation President Donna E. Shalala.“There is tremendous work being done in communities around the country to improve our collective health and well-being,” said Rain Henderson, CEO of the Clinton Health Matters Initiative. “Innovation is possible. Technology can power innovation and empower people. But, at the end of the day, nothing is possible without giving people a real sense of purpose and a real sense of community.”Also this week, the Clinton Foundation hosted a Day of Action at La Quinta High School where more than 75 students, teachers, and parents came together to cultivate a community garden and prepare 150 healthy meals that were donated to the Joslyn Center’s Meals on Wheels program. La Quinta High School offers a culinary arts program that is dedicated to teaching students the culinary arts and preparing them to major in the field in their post-secondary education. The culinary students prepared a healthy lunch for the Day of Action volunteers. La Quinta High School, along with the rest of the Desert Sands Unified School District, is part of the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools program.Key announcements from this year’s Summit included:Adapt Pharma, Limited announced their collaboration with CHMI to offer a free carton of NARCAN (naloxone hydrochloride) Nasal Spray to all high schools in the United States through the state departments of education. This announcement builds off of a 2015 announcement with Adapt Pharma to provide school districts, college campuses, public safety agencies, and community-based organizations access to discounted pricing to Naloxone.Harvard Health Publications announced a partnership with CHMI to develop an educational platform that builds the capacity of employers and employees to improve health and wellness within the workplace. Goals of the partnership include educating employees about behavioral health risk factors, prevention, impacts on physical health, evidence-based treatment options and outcomes, self-care and methods to overcome barriers to getting care.Mayor John Pritchard of Galesburg, Illinois announced Knox County, Illinois as CHMI’s sixth focus community under its Community Health Transformationportfolio. CHMI and its partners will engage key thought leaders and community stakeholders to develop a framework for improved health to decrease preventable disease and address health inequities and disparities.U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy presented the winners of the “Fight the Ladykiller” codeathon in October 2015, organized and run by CHMI in partnership with Cal State LA and The Women’s Heart Alliance. Over three days, 40 Cal State LA students came together in six teams to learn about women’s heart health and develop educational apps geared toward increasing awareness of cardiovascular disease, the leading killer of women. The diverse collection of creative ideas and applications that were presented included mobile games, quizzes, social media integration and fitness tracking apps.Kathy Douquet, CEO of Blue Star Families, announced a new partnership with CHMI to support spousal employment for military families by offering workforce development training and career building opportunities to military spouses. The pilot program consists of 8 initial cohorts of 14 participants, with each participant given group and individual training, as well as coaching on CRM database administration.Participants at this year’s Summit included President Bill Clinton, Founder, Clinton Foundation; Abby Wambach, World Cup and Olympic Champion; Donna E. Shalala, President, Clinton Foundation; Rain Henderson, CEO, Clinton Health Matters Initiative; Dr. Vivek Murthy, U.S. Surgeon General; Dr. J. Craig Venter, Founder, Chairman and CEO, J. Craig Venter Institute; Dan Buettner, Author and National Geographic Fellow; Dr. Reginald J. Eadie, Chief Executive Officer, Detroit Medical Center; Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, Executive Director, Minority Health for Cleveland Clinic; Linda Evans, Mayor, La Quinta, CA;Trevor Fetter, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Tenet Healthcare; Tim Finchem, Commissioner, PGA TOUR; Dr. Nate Gross, Co-founder, Rock Health; Dr. Ellen Meara, National Bureau of Economic Research Faculty Research Fellow and Adjunct Associate Professor in Economics & Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy, Dartmouth College; Dr. Charles Modlin, Founder and Director, Minority Men’s Health Center of Cleveland Clinic’s Glickman Urological Institute; Anya Pogharian, Inventor; Dr. Kyu Rhee, Chief Health Officer and Vice President of Integrated Health Services, IBM; Jeffrey D. Selberg, MHA, Executive Director, Peterson Center on Healthcare; and Dr. Donald K. Warne, Director of the Master of Public Health Program, North Dakota State University.last_img read more