Belmont Racetrack’s Triple Crown Chef

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The June 9 Belmont Stakes will be Chef Drew Revella’s fifteenth at Centerplate Inc., which coordinates the racetrack’s restaurants and catering. But this year he is racing to prepare for a bigger crowd than usual.Even with that cushion of experience and his yearlong preparations now coming to a close, there’s no telling what challenges 90,000 hungry guests might bring on the day of the event.“There’s a love of that chaos,” Revella says. “It’s not like every other job.”The third and final leg of the American Triple Crown, the Belmont Stakes is the longest of them all at 1 1⁄2 miles. That, coupled with the fact that front-runner Justify, the horse that won both the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness in May, has the potential to become the thirteenth-ever Triple Crown winner, makes it likely that the crowd at Belmont Park’s Elmont arena will be full.Triple Crown years have a markedly different feel, Revella says, adding that he is not generally a horse racing fan. He said it was incredible when, in 2015, he saw American Pharoah cross the finish line and win the Triple Crown.“I had one manager who worked with me over 10 years, she was literally crying in my arms because it was such an emotional experience to be part of something that exciting,” Revella recalls. “When you’re down on the track and you feel the horses run by, there’s a feeling you get that — it’s very hard to put words to it — but people know it who watch it.”Such moments are rare, though. Catering executives and employees rarely catch a glimpse of the events they work.“I’ve been [at the Belmont Stakes] for two years — haven’t seen it,” says Robert DiChiaro, regional vice president of Centerplate Inc., the event’s caterer. “I’ve worked Super Bowls, World Series, Stanley Cups, Final Fours — very rare that I’ve seen anything.”He shrugs it off and catches the highlights the next day.Revella describes working the event as a “near-death experience.” In a similar fashion to the horses’ circuit, Revella moves in circles around more than a dozen satellite kitchen stations, making sure everything is going according to plan. Food preparation begins about nine days before the event, but the bulk of the work can be done only in the hours before race day to preserve freshness.Revella, 47, of Staten Island, might clock in as early as 2 a.m. during those last few days of preparations, coordinating with hired vendors to execute the menu he crafted specially for this year’s 150th anniversary. His primary focus will be catering to a VIP echelon of guests (nearly 6,000) who have paid as much as $1,200 for a premium experience.“We have a very New York-centric theme this year,” Revella says. “We’re taking some old subway signs and displaying food on that, and there’s pictures of Old World New York.”Some of the new menu items this year include Brooklyn-cured GMO-free pastrami, hot dogs, sausages and an array of other charcuterie. Revella aimed to source food as locally as possible, tapping Brooklyn-based Gotham Greens, which produces urban rooftop-grown lettuces that Revella will hand pick ahead of the event.Revella, who attended culinary school at Johnson & Wales University in Providence, R.I., says he started cooking at age 6, helping out with the family business — a catering hall. He says he was “bouncing around in the kitchen throwing ingredients in soup kettles.”Now, as a regional executive chef for Centerplate, he says he channels that fun-loving creativity into how he leads his kitchen staff. In a high-stress role such as preparing for the Belmont Stakes, he urges his staff to stay calm.“Never panic,” he tells them. “There’s always a solution. And don’t be afraid to ask for help.”After thousands flood Belmont Park for the big day, Revella says he will likely “fall down,” but come 8 p.m. he’ll start tweaking his ideas for next year’s event. And June 10 is a regular racing day at Belmont Park, which means the Centerplate team has to be ready to go the next day.“We still gotta open for another normal day on Sunday,” DiChiaro says. “It’s organized chaos.”last_img read more

Collaboration power

first_imgIn 2017, during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, $3 billion asset Credit Human Federal Credit Union in San Antonio needed to provide members with pre-approved, short-term emergency funds. It found the answer in a credit union service organization (CUSO).The CUSO, QCash, offers a cloud-based payday loan alternative, says CEO Ben Morales. The credit union wasn’t looking to generate loans or fee income. It simply wanted to give members instant access to funds.“They wanted to automate and make their preapproved loan process more efficient,” he says. “Our engine does that well. So we made some adjustments to our system and built in some new capabilities, and we were able to help them.”The takeaway: Technology and collaboration make credit unions stronger, individually and collectively, Morales says. “If you’re part of a CUSO, the tide raises all boats.” continue reading » 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Police respond to report of shots fired on Doubleday Street in Binghamton

first_imgThis is a developing story. Stay with 12 News for more updates. A 12 News crew arrived to the scene around 2:30 a.m. and saw police canines being used and part of the street was blocked off. Officials say they received the call at 1:01 a.m. They also say the scene is now cleared. —– 5:32 a.m. UPDATE: As of 3:50 a.m., Binghamton Police said the road is still blocked off, but they could not confirm any details with 12 News. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — The Binghamton Police Department tells 12 News it responded to a report of shots fired. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — The Binghamton Police Department responded to an incident on Doubleday Street in Binghamton early Friday morning. This is a developing story. Stay with 12 News for more updates.last_img

It’s not crazy for African-American World Cup fans to root for Ghana

first_imgUnited States’ John Brooks, second from left, scores his side’s second goal during the group G World Cup soccer match between Ghana and the United States at the Arena das Dunas in Natal, Brazil, Monday, June 16, 2014. The United States defeated Ghana 2-1.(AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)Dear Race Manners:In Team USA’s World Cup game against Ghana, I found myself cheering for Ghana. On Twitter I was accused of being unpatriotic, including by some people I respect. It’s hard to explain, but what can I say? I wanted the African team – or maybe the brown(est) team – to win (I’m Black). Am I wrong? –If your friends are going to commit to tweeting accusations about patriotism at those who cheer for squads other than Team USA, they’ll be busy. I used the social network to ask, “Raise your hand if you cheer for World Cup teams playing against Team USA because of something to do with your racial/ethnic identity,” and received a chorus of affirmative responses, like this one:Jenée ? @[email protected] Details? Are you *from* somewhere else or is it a #blackthing like with @graceishuman?Grace @[email protected] I’m Nigerian, so it’s definitely that in part. But it’s also just being #TeamBrownPeople @BougieLaSome responses, like “If by ‘racial/ethnic identity’ you mean a hatred of White supremacy, militarism, and hegemony, mine is raised” (the author of that tweet preferred to stay anonymous), had nothing to do with direct family ties.Other fans apparently split the difference between rooting based on citizenship and rooting based on other interests – racially and culturally inspired interests – and cheered for both.Cherae Robinson, writing about “the complicated life of African-American World Cup fans,” observed that in the Brooklyn, N.Y., bar where she watched the Ghana game, “Almost every Bblack person in the bar was up on their feet rooting for the Black Stars with the same fervor as they had cheered team USA an hour before.”Given that we’re in an ethnically diverse country, talking about an international sport, there’s nothing strange or shocking about this choice. Just think of Irish fans in Boston cheering for Ireland, or Italian Americans in South Philadelphia or the North Side of Chicago rooting for Italy, says Gregory Carr, chair of Howard University’s Afro-American-studies department. After all, in his view, “Our experience is also an immigrant experience.”Jenée Desmond-Harris (Courtesy Photo)Lineage, the Diaspora and an Affinity for the UnderdogBut there’s another reason you and other African Americans who don’t think of themselves as immigrants and can’t trace their lineage to any particular place on the continent might have cheered for Ghana.“For many, rooting interest is as wide as not only the African continent but African people, and our passion connects to people of Africa worldwide,” says Carr. Plus, he says, all sports allow people to give expression to greater passions, and for plenty of black people, those passions include concern for the plight of people we perceive as underdogs, or oppressed.So I’m guessing your choice wasn’t just about nonwhite skin color. (It that were the case, you could choose just about any World Cup team, including Team USA, with its large handful of Black players – many of them German – to root for.) Rather, it was born from a lived experience. “We’ve had a hard time in this country,” says Carr, “and in those moments when we can give expression to what’s in our heart, we do it.”Patriotism Is not at issueTo be clear, there’s a difference between having cheering interests in an international competition that don’t line up with American nationalism and actually being unpatriotic. Tell your Twitter trolls to keep in mind that this wasn’t a war, it was a sporting event, otherwise known as a game. It’s a mistake to confuse affinity for a team in such a context to patriotism or loyalty to one’s country, and it’s safe for everyone to settle down in that area.Plus, African Americans have always been plenty patriotic, even if many of them experience that sentiment in a way that’s more complicated—and, yes, even more painful—than some might understand.“I love this country not because it’s perfect but because we’ve always been able to move it closer to perfection,” President Barack Obama once put it. In Carr’s words, African-American patriotism has largely been pragmatic. (“We have sacrificed blood in every war the U.S. has fought, but remember that in the Revolutionary War, more people fought against the Colonies than for them,” he says. “We didn’t care about the Colonies. We cared about being free!”)This distinction may be unnerving to those who are shocked to learn that some African Americans see the country, as Carr puts it, as “less of a common project and more of a common context.”“We have a Black president; when will you be satisfied?” your Twitter friends will ask at this point. Answer: Given the way White supremacy and racism and their accompanying policies are playing out in this country right now and affecting people’s lives up until this very moment, with little sign of improvement, probably not for a while.That’s heavy, but really, let’s keep your expression of support for the Ghana team in your local sports bar or on your Twitter timeline in perspective. Shouting “Goal!” when a non-American team scores “doesn’t mean we’re gonna set fire to cities; it doesn’t mean we’re gonna quit the military,” says Carr. “It’s just a statement that in this battle that doesn’t cost anybody any blood, I’m gonna root for the cats who represents what I identify with. ’Cause I feel like it.”African-American rooting interests are often tied up with larger issuesAnyone surprised by your choice of teams should take a trip down memory lane to see how African Americans’ sense of connectivity to Black people worldwide and of social justice without regard for borders has informed whom many of us have rooted for.Carr can tick off examples: Teófilo Stevenson, the Black Cuban boxer (“African Americans cheered for him! They loved him”); Olympic ice-skater Surya Bonaly (“We didn’t care that she was from France!); and even Serena Williams when she wore a uniform styled after Cameroon’s flag in a show of support for that country’s 2002 World Cup team (“Black Americans loved it! South Africans loved it. Remember, this is a young woman who goes to Florida and [racist] people curse at her”).That rooting patterns are informed by larger issues was even evident in the 1974 battle between boxers Muhammad Ali, who had a “pan-African, anti-colonial approach,” and George Foreman, who was far less sensitive to race politics, says Carr. Both were Black and from the U.S., but at the time of their fight, it was fresh in the collective African-American memory that in 1968, Foreman had “trotted around the ring with an American flag while [African-American Olympic track athletes] Tommie Smith and John Carlos had put everything on the line for Black power … so we looked at him like, ‘This man is a clown,’ and many favored Ali,” says Carr.Carr’s message to anyone who still can’t understand how you could shout anything but “Team USA!” is, “You don’t understand how Blackness works.” My suggestion is, if you’re going to do the work of explaining that to your friends, you’ll have to start with the basics: It’s more than just fun and games.(Jenée Desmond-Harris, The Root’s associate editor of features, covers the intersection of race with news, politics and culture. She wants to talk about the complicated ways in which ethnicity, color and identity arise in your personal life – and provide perspective on the ethics and etiquette surrounding race in a changing America. Follow her on Twitter. Need race-related advice? Send your questions to [email protected])last_img read more

Takeaways: Sharks fix issues, head into Arizona with momentum

first_imgSAN JOSE — The best teams that Pete DeBoer has had in his time with the Sharks have been able to quickly recognize what’s gone wrong after a loss and fix it in time for the next game.This year’s Sharks team is starting to share some of those same attributes, as they were able to distance themselves from an ugly loss earlier this week to beat the Los Angeles Kings on Friday.Patrick Marleau scored his 557th career NHL goal, Noah Gregor scored his first and Martin Jones made 32 saves to help …last_img

Zuma calls for nuclear terror vigilance

first_img27 March 2012South African President Jacob Zuma, speaking at the Nuclear Security Summit in Seoul, South Korea on Monday, stressed the importance of remaining alert to the risks posed by nuclear terrorism.“We should remain vigilant of the continued risks posed by nuclear terrorism, the illicit nuclear network and criminal acts, and the use of nuclear or other radioactive material for malicious acts,” Zuma said during a Leaders’ Working Dinner at the summit.“We can, through a cooperative approach in the relevant multilateral organisations, effectively deal with these risks.”‘Elimination ultimately the only prevention’Zuma noted that the leaders were meeting at the summit with the common aim of achieving a world free of weapons of mass destruction, in particular nuclear weapons.“In our desire to create a forum to raise awareness on nuclear security, we cannot ignore the reality that only the verifiable and irreversible elimination of nuclear weapons will ultimately prevent the use of such weapons.”Zuma also noted the need to fully implement the relevant international legally binding obligations on nuclear security and nuclear safety.Such an approach had proved invaluable when South Africa hosted the 2010 Fifa World Cup, Zuma said, thanking the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the US government for their assistance with nuclear security measures at the different World Cup venues.Highly enriched uranium ‘for peaceful uses only’On the issue of highly enriched uranium (HEU), Zuma acknowledged that HEU and separated plutonium required special precautions, adding that South Africa had taken such precautions.“Our international legally binding obligations on nuclear disarmament and nuclear non-proliferation allow for the enrichment of uranium for peaceful purposes only, irrespective of the enrichment level,” Zuma said. “In this connection, South Africa has adopted a policy on the beneficiation of our mineral resources, including uranium.”South Africa believed the focus on minimising the use of HEU to peaceful applications – which represented a tiny fraction of the HEU used for military purposes – should come to fruition in the long-outstanding negotiations on a fissile material treaty, Zuma added.These negotiations should commence in the Conference on Disarmament without further delay.“Going forward, we believe that the best approach would be to address the issues of nuclear safety and nuclear security in a coherent manner,” Zuma said. “Therefore, our future emphasis should be on supporting the work on nuclear safety and security undertaken by existing multilateral organizations such as the IAEA.”Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Energy-Saving Clothes Dryers Hit U.S. Markets

first_imgSeveral advantages over conventional modelsConventional dryers heat air inside a drum to drive moisture out of clothes. With most models, the moist, humid air is vented to the outside, which also takes some conditioned air from inside the house with it. So there’s a double energy penalty — high power consumption to run the dryer, and additional power to heat or cool inside air to replace what’s been lost.In Whirlpool’s heat pump clothes dryer, a refrigeration loop condenses the moisture picked up from the clothes and routes it to the same drain used by the clothes washer. Heat from the process is recirculated back to the drum. While the dryer has to be connected to a drain, it is not vented to the outside, so it can be installed in more places than a conventional dryer can.The design has won the EPA’s Emerging Technology Award, and earlier this month picked up an Innovation Award at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.According to Whirlpool, the dryer uses up to 73% less energy in its “Eco” mode when compared to a pre-2004 conventional dryer. The Super Efficient Dryer Initiative estimates that heat-pump clothes dryers are 50 percent to 60 percent more efficient than conventional models.The HybridCare has three speed settings — Eco, Balanced and Speed — with average drying times of about 60 minutes, according to the company. A 1,300-watt heating element kicks in when the Speed cycle is selected. The company also says the dryer operates at lower temperatures than a conventional dryer, so it’s not as tough on delicate fabrics.It’s not clear whether the LG dryer is vented to the outside or taps into the washer drain like the Whirlpool model does. Those details aren’t posted at the company’s web site, and the company didn’t respond to queries. Clothes dryers are the energy hogs of home appliances, accounting for 6 percent of total residential energy use and costing U.S. consumers $9 billion a year in power bills. Dryers use more electricity — an estimated 900 kilowatt hours a year — than either a refrigerator or a clothes washer.Homeowners in Europe have long had access to dryers that use heat-pump technology instead of electrical resistance elements or gas burners to dry clothes. And now two manufacturers, Whirlpool and LG, are rolling out heat-pump clothes dryers for U.S. buyers.Whirlpool’s 7.3-cubic-foot HybridCare clothes dryer is similar in size to conventional dryers on the U.S. market (although larger than most European models). The HybridCare comes with a suggested retail price of $1,799 in white, more than four times the cost of a base model Whirlpool available at Lowe’s.LG Electronics says that its Eco Hybrid heat-pump dryer, also with a 7.3-cubic foot capacity, was the first dryer in the U.S. to combine conventional vented drying with heat pump technology and uses about 50 percent less electricity than a conventional electric dryer. It sells for about $1,700.last_img read more

Urban Rustic: Ventilation Baffles

first_imgMaking ventilation chutes on siteWhen I realized the AccuVent wasn’t right for our project, it was a moment of, “Uh-oh, now what the hell do I do?”I assumed there must be a sturdier plastic baffle, but I never found one. Instead, I came across this article by Martin Holladay. As usual, old reliable — GBA — had already addressed the issue.It was nice to have a solution, but I also knew it would be time-consuming and back-breaking (also neck-straining) — the only thing worse than working with sheet goods is working with sheet goods above your head on a ladder. Nevertheless, I would sleep better knowing it was panels of OSB rubbing up against two feet of blown-in cellulose insulation rather than sheets of flimsy plastic. Long-term solutions do wonders for peace of mind.I used 2×4 blocks as a base for each ventilation chute — first, screwing the blocks to the roof trusses, then after putting the OSB into place, screwing through the OSB and into the bottom of each block. The image at the top of this post shows the first chute after I had put it into place and sealed the perimeter with OSI Quad Max sealant.There weren’t always sizable gaps where the OSB chute met the top of the Zip wall sheathing, but they did occur. When there was a gap, caused by a bend in the OSB chute or unevenness in the top of the wall sheathing, it looked like Image #3, below. These gaps could be fixed with narrow strips of OSB and OSI sealant, in the end looking like Image #4.I showed up on one rainy morning to continue installing the chutes. Image #5 shows the dramatic difference in before and after — light spilling into the interior through the soffits without chutes, and with chutes installed and sealed on the right. Image #6 shows the top of the wall from the outside with an air gap that will allow air to flow from the soffit into the attic, and then out at the ridge vents.Once the chutes were installed, I was finally ready to put the Intello membrane on the ceiling, which thankfully I didn’t have to install by myself (Image #7). I’ll describe that process in my next post here at GBA. Our structure was designed with a “cold roof,” or ventilated roof assembly. By having continuous ventilation in our north and south soffits, with a ridge vent on the top of our roof, outdoor air can freely enter the soffits and exit out the ridge vent. The benefits of this set-up are explained in this article by the Building Science Corporation, plus the first two articles you see listed in the “Related Articles” sidebar below.We plan on using Cor-A-Vent in the soffits.In order to make this kind of roof assembly work, ventilation baffles (also called ventilation chutes) are necessary, especially if the attic is going to have a significant amount of insulation, in particular blown-in insulation, that could potentially move around and block off the soffit ventilation from the attic, thereby short circuiting air flow from the soffits through the roof’s ridge vent.When it was time to install the ventilation baffles, I assumed I could just go to one of the big box stores and (thankfully for a change) just buy something off the shelf. It didn’t work out that way. Home Depot had Durovent (a foam-based ventilation baffle) and an AccuVent baffle (black plastic). Both were a disappointment.I didn’t buy the Durovent — when I saw it on the shelf and handled it in the store it looked cheap and unimpressive. It was hard to imagine it holding up under the pressure of any significant amount of blown-in insulation pressing against it. RELATED ARTICLES All About Attic Venting A Crash Course in Roof VentingSite-Built Ventilation Baffles for RoofsFans in the Attic: Do They Help or Do They Hurt?Q&A: Is Soffit Venting Necessary With a Vented Rainscreen? BLOGS BY ERIC WHETZEL Up on the RoofA Light Down BelowKneewalls, Subfloor, and Exterior WallsLet the Framing BeginDetails for an Insulated FoundationThe Cedar Siding Is Here — Let’s Burn ItAn Introduction to a New Passive House Project The AccuVent product that Home Depot carried only worked in a straight line (no curve to wrap over the back of the Zip sheathing at the top of our wall assembly), which would be ideal for a cathedral ceiling application. After looking around online, I found another AccuVent product described in a company video that looked like it would work (see Image #2, below.)Seeing the video made me think it would be an easy installation, but once I had the product and tried to install one, the realization hit that they would be a pain to air seal properly, and again, I had concerns about how it would do over the long term with blown-in insulation pressing up against it. Editor’s note: This post is one of a series by Eric Whetzel about the design and construction of his house in Palatine, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. The first blog in his series was called An Introduction to a New Passive House Project; a list of Eric’s previous posts appears below. For more details, see Eric’s blog, Kimchi & Kraut.last_img read more

Minnesota Homestead: Choosing Windows

first_imgEditor’s Note: This is part of a series of posts describing the construction of a net-zero energy house in Rochester, Minnesota, by Tracee Vetting Wolf, Matt Vetting, and their son Max. You can find their complete blog here. A list of their previous posts appears at the bottom of this column. This post was written by Matt. One of the important features of our house are the windows. The house is oriented with one of the long dimensions facing south with large windows on the main floor in order to allow the winter sun to heat the 4-inch-thick concrete slab in the living room and kitchen. In the 3D SketchUp illustration below of our house, on the left is the south-facing facade. The image on the right shows the north-facing facade. RELATED ARTICLESAdvances in WindowsHow to Order WindowsPassivhaus WindowsShedding light on WindowsWhat Windows Should I Buy? The north (right) and south elevations of the house show window placement.With a proper passive house design, solar gains can account for 20%-50% of the yearly heating cost. Ideally, the south facing windows should be an absolute maximum of 12% of the overall floor area. Any more than that and you will end up with overheating during the day and excessive heat loss at night. If you’re not carefully designing the structure to handle the heat load, a maximum of 8% is recommended. Some of the overheating during the day can be mitigated by providing a thermal mass to absorb the heat, evening out the heat gain and allowing heat to be radiated during times of shade or late in the day. Between 70% and 85% of the home’s windows should be south-facing to capture the most winter sun, which would be lost to windows facing north, east, or west. Several design iterations were executed to optimize the number and size of the windows to obtain the right ratio of windows-to-slab size. After factoring out the frames of the window so that glazing is correctly calculated, we have 273 square feet of glazing, with 196 square feet, or 72%, located on the southern face. The value is on the low side of the suggested value as other factors were considered, such as including operable windows upstairs on the north side for cooling. To make a proper calculation of the volume of the house to be conditioned, spaces such as the “open to above” area and the basement is counted in the overall square footage. Our total living space will be 1,732 square feet, but the total area of the house used for calculating conditioned space is 2,151 square feet. This number includes a 280- square-foot below grade basement (below one-third of the house) and the “open to above” area in the dining room. As such, the square footage ratio of south facing windows to overall floor area is 9.1%. Solar gain and U-factor To optimize solar gains and minimize thermal losses, the windows should have the lowest U-factor (the inverse of R-value) possible and highest solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC). We thought that triple-pane windows would be out of our price range so our initial design plans incorporated Marvin Integrity windows. However, after thinking about the form of heating and cooling we were going to utilize in our build (two outdoor minisplit compressors paired two indoor units, centrally located, one upstairs and one downstairs), we thought it essential that we upgrade to triple-pane to minimize heat loss and convection currents that can make a room feel cold. We used the National Fenestration Research Council (NFRC) certified product guide to get some ideas of which companies produce triple-pane windows that at least meet the version 6.0 of the Energy Star Guidelines for northern climates (U<=0.28, SGHC>=0.32). We sent our designs to Marvin, Zola, Wasco, and Accurate Dorwin and had each send us a quote. The specific product lines quoted were: Marvin Clad Ultimate, a wood-clad (pine) window with extruded aluminum exterior, double-pane Low E2 glass with argon fill. Wasco Geneo line, with frames made with a uPVC/fiberglass co-extruded material, argon-filled insulated triple-pane glass. Accurate Dorwins fiberglass triple-pane, argon-filled, Sungate 400 glass. Zola Thermo Clad pine wood triple-pane, argon-filled. The Marvin Clad Ultimate were relatively expensive for the meager U-values obtained (~0.28) and whose cost was mostly dictated by the use of wood for the frames. Aesthetically, on the interior space where the wood would be exposed they would have been amazing, but we couldn’t justify the extra cost and insufficient U-values. Similarly, the Zola Thermo Clad windows were slightly more, again due to the inclusion of wood, but they have the best thermal properties with a U-factor of 0.14, half that of the Marvin Clad Ultimate. In addition, the cost of shipping ($4,000-$5,000) added 20% to the cost of the window budget. While beautiful, Zola windows were out. The Wasco Geneo line and Accurate Dorwin windows were similar in price with Accurate Dorwin being slightly less expensive but with slightly poorer thermal performance, U=0.15 for Wasco and U=0.20 for Accurate Dorwin. Accurate Dorwin had a version of the window with a U=0.14, but this sacrificed the SGHC and would only be appropriate for non-south facing windows. On the negative side, the Wasco Doors were 30%-60% more expensive than the Accurate Dorwin doors. (For a table showing doors and window specifications and prices, take a look at this blog entry). In the end, the thermal properties of the Wasco windows and doors and the 20% final discount on the entire bill led us to choose the Wasco Geneo line. In addition, Wasco is produced in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, my hometown, so we could go and visit the manufacturing facility and showroom. Mike Wilson from Wasco windows gave over an hour of his time showing us how Wasco windows are manufactured. We were able to see and touch the product lines which gave us confidence in our selections. Final numbers The total rough opening square footage was 354.5 square feet, of which doors were 83.4 sq. ft. and the garage windows were 28.7 sq, ft, (double pane). The total cost was about $17,000. Approximately $8,000 of that was for the three doors. The cost overall was about $48 per square foot. If you look at the cost for the triple-pane fixed and operable windows, the cost was about $33.5 per square foot. This is a totally reasonable price for the excellent thermal properties the Wasco windows provide. The costs mentioned here do not reflect shipping. Accurate Dornin came with free shipping, Wasco shipping was about $500 and Zola was going to be as much as $5,000. The 20% Wasco discount is not reflected in the calculations above. Installation We ordered a total of 18 windows and doors. That included 13 triple- pane windows, one each facing east and west, two facing north and nine facing south. There are three full glass doors — two swing doors and one sliding door. The swing doors face east (to patio) and west (main door), while the large slider faces south. The remaining two windows are simple double-pane windows that face north out of the garage, which is an unheated space. The windows are European style tilt-and-turns, which means they open inward rather than outward and depending on the orientation of the handle they can either swing open or tilt inward. They also have several attachment points when locked assuring that the sash seals tightly to the frame when closed. Installation was a difficult process due to the below-freezing temperatures we were having at the time, as well as some timing issues. We had been working with a particular individual at WASCO windows who had indicated he would come up with the windows and help do a couple of installs. Well, on the day of delivery we learned that employee had jumped ship so no installation examples were going to happen that day, which is probably good because our window openings had not been prepped due to subcontractor time constraints and the weather. The owner of the company David Paulus agreed that he would personally come up (a 4-hour drive) and help with the install a week later. Unfortunately, there was a miscommunication and when he arrived our build team was not ready. At least he was able to look at our situation and give some guidance on what to do prior to his next visit a week later. We so appreciated that he agreed to make the drive again and the next time he arrived we had the men and materials to prep the openings and do the install. Other posts about the Minnesota Homestead: Why We Built an Energy-Efficient Home Energy Planning for a Net-Zero Home Nordic Rootslast_img read more