Happy Birthday to Meabh and Saoirse

first_imgAdvertisement There is a big birthday celebration taking place at Bunratty Castle and Folk Park on Sunday 23rd February as Meabh and Saoirse – Bunratty’s resident Irish wolfhounds – turn two years old!To celebrate the occasion Shannon Heritage, part of the Shannon Group, is holding a big birthday bash at Bunratty Castle from 1pm – 4pm.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up There will be a variety of activities and entertainment for all the family taking place during the afternoon including face-painting, a kiddies disco, a LEGO play and performances from the very popular Konor the Clown.Pictured with Irish Wolfhound Meabh at Bunratty Castle and Folk Park are Breesha Shinners (age 8) and her brother Eoinín (age 4) from Limerick.Don’t miss the opportunity to sing Happy Birthday to Meabh and Saoirse as the wolfhounds are presented with a very special birthday present of a neckerchief at 2pm. Both Meabh and Saoirse are looking forward to having all their fans and friends there for the special occasion! Speaking about the birthday celebration, Niall O’Callaghan, Managing Director of, Shannon Heritage said: “Since coming to Bunratty Castle and Folk Park, Meabh and Saoirse have really made themselves at home and are proving to be really popular with our visitors. We are proud of our great team here that takes excellent care of Meabh and Saoirse ensuring that they are very happy at Bunratty Castle.“This will be a great celebration with a fantastic afternoon of entertainment. It’s not every day you get to have a birthday party for two Irish wolfhounds.”The two Irish wolfhounds were named after Shannon Heritage ran a competition on its Facebook page where it invited members of the public to suggest potential names.Entries were received from all over Ireland, UK, India, US and as far afield as New Zealand. In the end, Tipperary Lady, Charlotte Bond was chosen as the winner. Her suggestion of Meabh and Saoirse was chosen from over 1000 names. WhatsApp NewsHappy Birthday to Meabh and SaoirseBy Meghann Scully – February 12, 2020 565 Facebook Previous articleFarrell and O’Donoghue released from Irish camp ahead of Munster’s Pro14 returnNext articleWATCH: Larkham full of praise for Ireland’s Munster contingent Meghann Scullycenter_img Linkedin Email Print Twitterlast_img read more

Mayor leads National Day of Commemoration in Limerick

first_imgLimerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Facebook Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Advertisement The Fianna Fáil leader of Limerick City and County Council Cllr Michael Collins celebrates with his mother Peggy after being elected as the seventh Mayor of the City and County of Limerick, held at LImerick Racecourse.Pic. Brian ArthurMAYOR of the City and County of Limerick, Cllr Michael Collins has led a ceremony of remembrance in Merchant’s Quay as part of the National Day Commemoration.A much-reduced ceremony, due to Covid-19 took place this morning [Sunday 12 July] in the courtyard of the headquarters of Limerick City and County Council, attended by representatives from the Council, Defence Forces, and members of Various Veteran associations, remembering those who have lost their lives while serving abroad or who have served their country overseas.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Previous articleMuireann O’Connell in Limerick with Virgin Media after lockdownNext articleFAI Announce Return Dates for Airtricity Underage League Meghann Scully WhatsApp Linkedin WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Twittercenter_img Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live NewsMayor leads National Day of Commemoration in LimerickBy Meghann Scully – July 13, 2020 127 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Print Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League openerlast_img read more

Teaching children to love themselves

first_imgMany of the children come from disadvantaged backgrounds so Lovy encourages them to develop their self-love and to use this strength in their environment. Work with the mirror, using exercises from the Lovy book, promotes self-awareness and can help a child to deal with a negative self-image. Lovy is aimed at all children aged five to ten years.(Images: Lovy – Loves You)MEDIA CONTACTS • Dee Boehner Kidz2Kidz Trust+27 83 460 4449RELATED ARTICLES• Giving children a sense of pride• The right to dignity• Let’s learn and honour Children’s Act• Pupils get a lesson on dignity• Putting children’s rights firstCadine PillayAccording to life coach Annett Burmester, without knowing it, we often live what is expected of us and not what we truly want. We focus too much on others when it is important to understand our needs, fears and feelings, to recognise our beliefs and behaviour patterns.“What about your attitude towards yourself and your life?” This is the message Burmester wishes to convey to children with backgrounds that often demoralise them.Giving children a chanceOriginally from Germany, Burmester met Dee Boehner, founder of the Cape Town-based Kidz2Kidz Trust, in February 2010 while volunteering with the Santa Shoebox Project in the city.“I fell in love with Cape Town and the city gave me so much which I felt compelled to give back,” Burmester says.As a life coach, the main focus of Burmester’s work is teaching self-love, which is the most important inner strength for more happiness in life. She is also an illustrator, designer and author working on a book about self-love – a perfect mix to create a new project for the children in need.Boehner then proposed the creation of a short book to illustrate the idea of self-love. So Burmester wrote a story book with the character called Lovy, designed the Lovy toy and came up with the name which derives from “Loves You”.Born in South Africa, Lovy is the character portrayed as the hero in the books, and the figure is aimed at all children aged five to ten years to show them how loveable they are.The Lovy books contain a moral lesson, which will help the kids to become more aware of themselves.“It is a good way to allow them to start realising ‘that’s me’ and ‘I am important’,” Burmester says.The story has been written in three languages English, Afrikaans, Sesotho and isiXhosa. More Lovy books in different languages will be available in the future.In 2011 Lovy was run as a pilot project in the Western Cape and in 2012 launched successfully in Gauteng. The intention is to expand the Lovy project around the country.Burmester also holds follow-up sessions, where social workers sit in, with any child who needs additional coaching.Increasing self-esteem Burmester went on to develop Lovy as a special coaching project for children living in children’s homes and orphanages to help them to build their self-esteem and realise their potential. The project carries out group workshops using the Lovy Kit which comprises a Lovy book, a mirror and the cuddly toy called Lovy.“The Lovy toy is important because children need something to cuddle,” Burmester adds. “Having Lovy will give them a feeling of security and warmth. Lovy is like a friend who is always with them and listening to their feelings. They often own nothing, not even a toy.”The Lovy toys are made by seamstresses in the townships which provide opportunities for employment and empowerment.During the workshops Lovy shows children that they are loveable, unique and special. Work with the mirror, using exercises from the Lovy book, promotes self-awareness and can help a child to deal with a negative self-image.“Mirrors are often absent in children’s homes and orphanages. We use the mirror so that the children can say ‘I love me’ – using their very own name, looking into the mirror,” explains Burmester.“Nobody can take away their pain, but they will learn to love themselves and thus gain more and more self-confidence every day.”The mirrors are made from recycled materials by the children as part of the Art2Kidz Project to involve them creatively in the Lovy intiative.The right to be loved and respected“We all have the right to be loved and respected,” says Burmester. “We need to give these children a chance for a better and peaceful world. They are our future too.”Many of the children come from disadvantaged backgrounds so Lovy encourages them to develop their self-love and to use this strength in their environment.“These children have experienced more violence than luck or love in their young lives,” she says. “We show them how they can develop their love of self and use this strength in their environment.”Lovy is orange which is the colour for children as it symbolises joy and confidence. In colour therapy, the colour orange is used to help overcome psychological and mental exhaustion.“Its purpose is to bring more love and happiness into their lives as they are abandoned, afraid, unloved and hurt,” says Burmester. “They will learn to believe in themselves and live again. It will also teach them that we all have a great deal of love in ourselves and that there is nothing wrong with being an orphan.“It touches me again and again when I see how these children soak up Lovy’s message and how they integrate this into their lives.”The Lovy days coincide with 14 February, Valentine’s Day. They are celebrated in children’s homes and orphanages with workshops that share the message: “You are loveable, unique and special”.last_img read more

The Pretty Good House, Part 2

first_imgMore suggestions for a PGHDan Kolbert, builder and moderator, kicked it off by briefly recapping the results of the first discussion and the comments to Part 1 of this blog series. He clarified that, in his mind at least, the PGH is not meant to be a prescriptive measure for all climate zones (and that in fact he’s not really sure what it’s supposed to be at all), but that we should try to focus our discussion on our zone (Climate Zone 6) and to consider how other climates might relate. RELATED ARTICLES The Pretty Good HouseMartin’s Pretty Good House ManifestoThe Pretty Good House: A Better Building Standard?Regional Variations on the ‘Pretty Good House’Is the Pretty Good House the Next Big Thing?Is the Pretty Good House the Next Big Thing? Part 2Green Building for BeginnersWith many sharp minds in the room and no strong agenda, the discussion wandered around, and as usual there was no consensus on what the PGH metrics should be or even what the PGH concept really means. Good things came out of the discussion though, including the following ideas of what should be included in a Pretty Good House:Near net zero. Jason Peacock suggested this, and he practices what he preaches. He propsed that a PGH should have utility bills of no more than $500 to $700 a year, and that no house should be built without renewable energy systems as part of the mechanical mix.Zoned heating system to reduce the load. Jim Godbout, one of Maine’s premier plumbing and heating experts, says that one relatively inexpensive way to reduce demand on the heating system is to provide separate zones for different parts of the house. He said that if you are using a boiler, a popular choice in Maine, you can also use the boiler to heat domestic hot water — an approach that usually requires a boiler rated at 80,000 Btu/h or more. He says that in a tight, well-insulated house, the heat load could be reduced to 20,000 Btu per square foot per year or less, at which point electrically supplied heat can make sense — but you will need another heat source to supply domestic hot water.Mechanical ventilation should be a given. An HRV or ERV, or possibly an exhaust-only ventilation system, is required with the airtightness level expected of a PGH.At the previous discussion, Mike Pindell of I&S Insulation had suggested 2 ach50 as a reasonably easy target to hit; informal feedback seems to indicate that tighter levels may be preferred. Mike says, “We’re standing here in rarified air,” arguing about the difference between 1 and 2 ach50, when the vast majority of people out there are nowhere near these numbers. Is this a case of building nerds being nerdy, or are supertight blower door numbers really necessary?No fossil fuels. Phil Kaplan offers this concept, and has achieved it in his firm’s Bright Built Barn, which produces more power than it uses. Using no fossil fuels at all may be more than Pretty Good, so the suggestion was amended to “no fossil fuels burned on site.” Affordably sized grid-tied renewable energy system, here we come.Renovating vs. new construction. Dan states that until we get our heads around the concept of the PHG, let’s stick to new construction. Architect Liz Newman argues that in 50 years, 90% of the housing stock will be stock that exists now, so thinking about retrofits is vitally important. Margo Billings of Horizon Energy Services asks whether retrofits should meet the same standards as PGH specifications for new homes. Clearly this group is focused on retrofits, and further discussion about retrofits, when we get to it, will be interesting.Client concerns. Sam Zuckerman of Solaris says that we should bring the discussion back to the customers. Their concerns about achieving a reasonable return on their investment are something he hears about all the time when talking to people about energy upgrades and installations. Should the PGH specifications be a list of “Do this, don’t do that,” or should it be about giving the client the best house you can for the money they are willing to spend?On one hand, Dan relates a story about a leading green builder in New England, who tells customers: If you already have 500 square feet per person, I will not build you an addition.On the other hand, Bob Earnest of Spring Island Builders says, “If you can help people build a greener house than they would have otherwise, then yes — we should continue to encourage smaller footprints. But don’t run away from a house that’s bigger than you might prefer.  Each case has to stand on its own.  Every time we can make a house greener, or smaller, or better — that’s a win.”A house that uses little fuel will cost less to operate, allowing for a bigger mortgage, and energy incentives also make a difference in what homeowners can afford, so the cost vs. square foot debate is a moving target. Client education is a big part of this too; Dan suggests a Pretty Good House coloring book to help all parties visualize what is important.Energy-efficient assemblies. Wes Riley, an energy rater and consultant, suggests we follow the latest energy code requirements — specifically the 2012 IECC, which has some interesting changes over past iterations. As most of us are not yet aware of the upcoming changes, he says that there is going to be a move from insulation R-value to overall wall assembly U-factor, taking into account thermal bridging and window and door performance. Wes suggests that any house with a HERS performance rating of 40 or less is Pretty Good.Margo agrees that the tipping point is right around HERS 40; that’s where you start to see serious reductions in energy use. Wes says that the easiest thing you can do is to minimize thermal bridging; Sam agrees that it doesn’t cost a lot and makes a big difference in wall U-factors. Wes says that in the 2012 IECC, air leakage is also going to be a major factor.Tom Fullam points out that in any wall assembly you need to be aware of moisture management issues — there’s no sense in building a superinsulated house if it’s not going to be durable.Prescriptive vs. performance. Jim Godbout says that he recently went to a meeting of ten reputable builders — these are guys who are proud of the way they are building — and all ten were insulating in different ways: proof that prescriptive paths don’t work.Mike Pindell and Chris Corson agree that if the PGH is going to require high performance levels, the standard has to be performance-based. Chris, who recently built a house that “killed the Passivhaus standard,” says that PGH could be the beginning of a potential paradigm shift. Sam agrees, and says that there doesn’t need to be one solution with a ribbon around it; simply planting five ideas in someone’s head will make a big difference.Steve Konstantino, owner of Maine Green Building Supply (our gracious host and provider of delicious sausages and other snacks), thinks that including an energy model up front is very important, in addition to testing performance at the end of the project. The best response so far to the second question came from Shepard Bosworth, a builder: you get a Pretty Good Plaque. But I think there may be other good answers to both questions. Let’s hear them. What is truly important when designing and building a green home? Some of the many existing programs don’t go far enough, some are accused of going too far, and some just miss the mark. What should be included in a Pretty Good House?We had a pretty good turnout, 50 people or so, at the most recent building science discussion group, held each month at Maine Green Building Supply in Portland. Plugs were made for the upcoming Maine Indoor Air Quality conference and the NESEA conference in Boston. We did a quick round of self-introductions, and then we got down to business — Part 2 of the Pretty Good House discussion. What’s the point?At the end of the night, there seemed to be a few recurring questions:center_img Should you quantify the PGH, and if so, how? And what is the purpose of the PGH?last_img read more

Inuk woman details her fall into Ottawas sex trade to inquiry –

first_imgTom FennarioAPTN NewsThe hearings for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls heard from an Inuk woman Tuesday who spent ten years in Ottawa’s sex trade.Mealia Sheutipik told the inquiry that she saw a murder when she was a young child and it took years to get over it.Her emotional testimony detailed how she ended up there and what Indigenous women need to do to get [email protected]@tfennariolast_img