9 days agoLiverpool legend Kuyt: Klopp’s squad better than 2008/09

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Liverpool legend Kuyt: Klopp’s squad better than 2008/09by Freddie Taylor9 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool legend Dirk Kuyt says the current team is better than the 2008-09 squad.Managed by Rafa Benitez, the Reds finished second behind Manchester United that year with a squad featuring Fernando Torres, Steven Gerrard and Javier Mascherano.And Kuyt thinks Jurgen Klopp’s side will go one better this season.”We were very close to success,” Kuyt told Liverpool’s official website of the 2008-09 squad, “we just missed a small detail to go one step further.”With the likes of Stevie [Gerrard] and Jamie Carragher, Mascherano, Torres and other very good players, we just missed a little something.”If you see the build-up of the team of Klopp, you see it progressing every time and it looks like it’s now coming to success also in the Premier League. We were a particular team like that, only we couldn’t go one step further at that time.”Hopefully this team will do it because, in my opinion, this team now on the pitch is even better than ours.” last_img read more

Israeli firm says it can turn garbage into biobased plastic

first_imgKIBBUTZ ZEELIM, Israel – Hawks, vultures and storks circle overhead as Christopher Sveen points at the heap of refuse rotting in the desert heat. “This is the mine of the future,” he beams.Sveen is chief sustainability officer at UBQ, an Israeli company that has patented a process to convert household trash, diverting waste from landfills into reusable bio-based plastic.After five years of development, the company is bringing its operations online, with hopes of revolutionizing waste management and being a driver to make landfills obsolete. It remains to be seen, however, if the technology really works and is commercially viable.UBQ operates a pilot plant and research facility on the edge of southern Israel’s Negev Desert, where it has developed its production line.“We take something that is not only not useful, but that creates a lot of damage to our planet, and we’re able to turn it into the things we use every day,” said Albert Douer, UBQ’s executive chairman. He said UBQ’s material can be used as a substitute for conventional petrochemical plastics and wood, reducing oil consumption and deforestation.UBQ has raised $30 million from private investors, including Douer, who is also chief executive of Ajover Darnel Group, an international plastics conglomerate.Leading experts and scientists serve on its advisory board, including Nobel Prize chemist Roger Kornberg, Hebrew University biochemist Oded Shoseyov, author and entrepreneur John Elkington and Connie Hedegaard, a former European Commissioner for Climate Action.The small plant can process one ton of municipal waste per hour, a relatively small amount that would not meet the needs of even a midsize city. But UBQ says that given the modularity, it can be quickly expanded.On a recent day, UBQ Chief Executive Tato Bigio stood alongside bales of sorted trash hauled in from a local landfill.He said recyclable items like glass, metals and minerals are extracted and sent for further recycling, while the remaining garbage — “banana peels, the chicken bones and the hamburger, the dirty plastics, the dirty cartons, the dirty papers” — is dried and milled into a powder.The steely grey powder then enters a reaction chamber, where it is broken down and reconstituted as a bio-based plastic-like composite material. UBQ says its closely-guarded patented process produces no greenhouse gas emissions or residual waste byproducts, and uses little energy and no water.According to the United Nations Environment Program, 5 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions are produced by decomposing organic material in landfills. Roughly half is methane, which over two decades is 86 times as potent for global warming as carbon dioxide, according to the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.For every ton of material produced, UBQ says it prevents between three and 30 tons of CO2 from being created by keeping waste out of landfills and decomposing.UBQ says its material can be used as an additive to conventional plastics. It says 10-15 per cent is enough to make a plastic carbon-neutral by offsetting the generation of methane and carbon dioxide in landfills. It can be moulded into bricks, beams, planters, cans, and construction materials. Unlike most plastics, UBQ says its material doesn’t degrade when it’s recycled.The company says converting waste into marketable products is profitable, and likely to succeed in the long run without government subsidies.“What we do is we try to position ourselves at the end of the value chain, or at the end of the waste management hierarchy,” Sveen said. “So rather than that waste going to a landfill or being incinerated, that’s kind of our waste feedstock.”The wonder plastic isn’t without its skeptics, however. Duane Priddy, chief executive of the Plastic Expert Group, said UBQ’s claims were “too good to be true” and likened it to alchemy.“Chemists have been trying to convert lead to gold for centuries, without success,” Priddy, a former principal scientist at Dow Chemical, said in an email to The Associated Press. “Likewise, chemists have been trying to convert garbage to plastic for several decades.”UBQ said it is confident its technology will prove the skeptics wrong. “We understand that’s people’s perceptions. We hope to convince them in a professional and scientific manner,” Sveen said.Even if its technology is ultimately successful, UBQ faces questions about its long-term viability. Building additional plants could be expensive and time-consuming. It also needs to prove there is a market for its plastic products. The company said it is negotiating deals with major customers, but declined to identify them or say when the contracts would go into effect.The U.N. Environment Program has made solid waste disposal a central issue to combatting pollution worldwide. Landfills contaminate air, water and soil, and take up limited land and resources. A December 2017 report by the international body devoted five of its 50 anti-pollution measures to reducing and processing solid waste.“Every year, an estimated 11.2 billion tons of solid waste are collected worldwide,” the organization says. “The solution, in the first place, is the minimization of waste. Where waste cannot be avoided, recovery of materials and energy from waste as well as remanufacturing and recycling waste into usable products should be the second option.”Israel lags behind other developed countries in waste disposal. The country of roughly 8 million people generated 5.3 million metric tons of garbage in 2016, according to the Environment Ministry. Over 80 per cent of that trash ended up in increasingly crowded landfills. A third of Israel’s landfill garbage is food scraps, which decompose and produce greenhouse gases like methane and carbon dioxide.To UBQ, that means a nearly limitless supply of raw material.“The fact is that the majority of waste goes to a landfill or is leaked into our natural environments because there simply aren’t holistic and economically viable technologies out there,” said Sveen.last_img read more

Enbridge TransCanada shares flat after steep dive due to US tax ruling

first_imgCALGARY, A.B. – Shares in Canadian pipeline companies Enbridge Inc. and TransCanada Corp. failed to recover fully Friday from a steep sell-off on Thursday after the U.S. said it would eliminate a tax break for owners of certain interstate pipelines.Both Calgary-based companies hold such pipelines in the United States through master limited partnerships or MLPs.The decision by the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to no longer allow MLPs to recover an income tax allowance from the cost of service tariffs came in response to a 2016 court ruling that found its long-standing tax policy could result in double recovery of costs. Enbridge shares fell by 4.2 percent to $41.06 on Thursday but recovered to close at $41.28 on Friday, up 22 cents, after it issued a statement that says it is not expecting a “material change” to its financial guidance over the next three years because of the FERC ruling.TransCanada shares dropped 2.1 per cent to $55.89 on Thursday. On Friday, they rebounded to reach an interday high of $56.45 but closed two cents lower.The company had no immediate comment.FirstEnergy Capital said in a report TransCanada will be less affected than Enbridge because its main exposure is through its interest in TC PipeLines.Enbridge has two MLPs, Enbridge Energy Partners, and Spectra Energy Partners.It said in its statement the former is expected to experience an $80-million decrease in annual distributable cash flow because of the FERC decision, but that will be somewhat offset by a revenue increase on the Canadian Mainline system held by Enbridge IncomeFund Holdings Inc. About 60 percent of Spectra’s gas pipeline revenue comes from negotiated or market-based tariffs and are not directly affected by the FERC policy revisions but the remainder is from a cost of service-based tariffs which “could be subject to tax recovery disallowance,” it said. Spectra pipelines that move oil and other petroleum liquids are not expected to be affected.CIBC estimated the FERC ruling would knock about $3 per share from of its valuation of Enbridge and $1 per share for TransCanada.“We cannot help but wonder about the long-term viability of MLPs,” it said in a report.“Our expectations are that many of the MLPs held by corporations will need to consider converting to corporations if no consideration is given to the fact that they are held by taxable U.S. entities.”center_img The report says the implications of the FERC decision are difficult to quantify given the strategies companies may employ to deal with it and the mix of existing rate structures and rate settlement terms, but the impact should decline over time as newer pipelines tend to employ negotiated rates, not cost of service tariffs.(THE CANADIAN PRESS)last_img read more

Coaching carousel connects Ohio State Michigan State

Left: Michigan State coach Mark Dantonio appears on the sidelines during a game against OSU on Sept. 29, 2012 in East Lansing, Mich. OSU won, 17-16. Credit: TNS Right: OSU co-defensive coordinator and linebackers coach Luke Fickell talks to players on the sideline during a game against Penn State on Oct. 25 in State College, Pa. OSU won in double-overtime, 31-24. Credit: Ritika Shah / Lantern TV News directorWhen Ohio State football fans, players and coaches look across the field Saturday night, there will be more than one familiar face staring back at them.With four straight years of matchups, there was bound to be some familiarity between the two teams as the co-leaders of the Big Ten East Division are scheduled to square off again.Michigan State coach Mark Dantonio spent three seasons in Columbus as the Buckeyes’ defense coordinator (2001-03), helping OSU win a national championship in 2002, before taking his first head coaching job less than two hours from OSU at Cincinnati.During his time with the Bearcats, Dantonio coached with current OSU tight ends and fullbacks coach Tim Hinton.When Dantonio accepted the head coaching job at Michigan State in 2007, Hinton said he was on his way to join him, but changed his mind on the way to East Lansing, Mich.“In reality, I was in a car with suitcases in a car driving towards an airport, and I called Mark and I said ‘I can’t go, I’m going to stay at Cincinnati,’” Hinton said Monday. “I was supposed to have gone with him.”Hinton stayed at Cincinnati for two more seasons before following Brian Kelly to Notre Dame for another two years.Now in his third year at OSU, Hinton said he expects Dantonio to use anything he can to motivate the Spartans for Saturday’s matchup.“I do know Mark very well. The thing that’s really interesting about Mark and that group, they are they have a unique way of saying, ‘OK, I’m going to put the chip on my shoulder somewhat,’” Hinton said. “There’s going to be something that comes out of this press conference, I’m going to guarantee you they’re going to put on a bulletin board somehow, some way, the world’s against them.”Dantonio acknowledged his relationship with Hinton during his weekly press conference Tuesday and said he believes a motivated team is key to winning a big game.“Sometimes I do think you have to play with an edge,” Dantonio said. “I think this is a physical type — I’m talking football in general is a very physical game and it’s a very emotional game and you have to have your tank full, emotionally full to be able to play through the ups and downs of a football game.”Dantonio isn’t the only former Buckeye assistant wearing green and white nowadays as longtime OSU offensive coordinator and offensive line coach Jim Bollman (2001-11) is in his second season as the Spartans co-offensive coordinator and tight ends coach.Current OSU co-defensive coordinator and linebackers coach Luke Fickell, who has been a Buckeye assistant since 2002, said Monday that he considers his peers in East Lansing more of acquaintances than friends.“Friends would probably be someone you talk to on a weekly basis or maybe monthly basis. If that’s the case, I don’t think I have a whole lot of friends,” Fickell said. “The reality is there is a lot of people over there (Michigan State) that I have known, I have worked with and have some long-standing relationships with.”From a game plan standpoint, OSU coach Urban Meyer said he doesn’t expect a big change from the Spartan staff.“The one thing about their coach and coaching staff, they’re pretty set in what they do. They’re really good at it,” Meyer said Monday. “But they’ll have a little wrinkle here and there that we have to be ready for. That’s why we’re watching what we did against them last year. And how do you prepare for it? We anticipate and you give them that rep in practice. That’s the only way to do it.”Friends or not, the Buckeyes and Spartans are scheduled to kick off from Spartan Stadium at 8 p.m. Saturday. read more

Ohio State fencers takes its talent overseas for Junior World Championships

Sophomore Eleanor Harvey (left) competes at the 2015 NCAA National Championships in Columbus.Credit: Courtesy of OSU athleticsCollegiate athletes are rarely given the opportunity to travel to a foreign country to compete.But four members of the Ohio State’s co-ed fencing team are set to get that chance. Freshman epee Marc-Antoine Blais Belanger, freshman sabre Hector Florencia, freshman foil Maximilian Chastanet and sophomore foil Eleanor Harvey are scheduled to travel to Uzbekistan and compete from Wednesday through April 9 in the Junior World Championships.OSU’s fencing coach of 15 years, Vladimir Nazlymov, said while the game has changed through the years, the objective stays the same.“Fencing today has undergone a lot of change over time and has become more aggressive,” Nazlymov said. “Our goal is to recruit guys who can earn medals in the world championships. We always fight for first.”Harvey, a native of Hamilton, Ontario, has fenced for 10 years and is set to take part in her sixth junior world championships. Harvey said she has some added pressure this time around after a high finish in 2014.“Last year, I came in second at the Junior World Championships, so this year I feel pretty compelled to do well,” Harvey said. “My goal is definitely to medal. I’ve done one Junior World Cup this year and I came in second, so that showed me I have the ability to compete.”Harvey said the most challenging aspect of fencing is the planning and preparation involved.“There has to be so many things that are working for you in one day in order for you to fence well,” she said. “You have to feel really good physically, you have to be mentally focused and sharp and not distracted and you have to be thinking about the right things. It’s definitely challenging considering how many things have to be working for you to have a good day.”Harvey added that collegiate fencing in the United States is much different than fencing in her home country of Canada.“There are a lot more people to fence here,” she said. “University fencing in Canada is very similar to recreational fencing. If I would’ve stayed in Canada, I couldn’t have fenced at the collegiate level that I would have liked to, as I am here at Ohio State.”The World Championships are set to be held in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, for the first time. The competition is expected to feature more than 1,000 athletes from countries around the world, according to the International Fencing Federation. read more

Football 5 plays that mattered in Ohio States 4921 win over Indiana

Sophomore safety Jordan Fuller (4) runs the ball in the opposite direction after intercepting a pass intended for an Indiana wide receiver. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorEach game, the momentum can shift from one team to the other on one play. Every week, we will list five plays, elements of plays or series of plays that made the most significant impact in Ohio State’s games. Here’s the five plays that mattered most in No. 2 Ohio State’s 49-21 victory at Indiana.Sheffield, Fuller save a scoreOhio State was trailing 7-3 early in the second quarter when Indiana had possession. Following an Indiana fourth-down conversion that extended the drive into the Buckeyes’ red zone, safety Jordan Fuller intercepted Indiana quarterback Richard Lagow’s pass on the goal line to save a would-be touchdown.Cornerback Kendall Sheffield deflected the pass intended for Indiana’s Donovan Hale, and it fell into Fuller’s arms. The sophomore safety, who made his first-career start Thursday, returned it 40 yards, sparking an Ohio State drive that ended in a 19-yard field goal by Sean Nuernberger.Ohio State trailed 7-6 instead of potentially facing a 13- deficit. Terry McLaurin’s block on Campbell touchdownAt the 4:56 mark in the third quarter, H-back Parris Campbell electrified the Buckeyes’ sideline with his 74-yard, breakaway touchdown reception to retake the lead, 27-21, just 18 seconds after Indiana reclaimed the advantage. However, one might have missed McLaurin sealing the edge, allowing Campbell to display his world-class speed.McLaurin was arguably Ohio State’s best blocking receiver in 2016, and he showed why in a pivotal moment of the game. Matched up against Indiana defensive back Rashard Fant, McLaurin steered Fant to the ground as Campbell raced past the rest of the [email protected] hauls it in……aaand he’s gone. @OhioStateFB regains the lead in lightning-quick fashion! https://t.co/2WR83hQQuM— Big Ten Network (@BigTenNetwork) September 1, 2017Ohio State never relinquished the lead after that.Cornell forced fumble puts game on iceOhio State’s defensive line is deep, there’s no questioning that. However, it’s doubtful many foresaw defensive tackle Jashon Cornell making a profound impact this early in the season.The third-year player from St. Paul, Minnesota, rushed Indiana’s left guard on third down with 12:42 to play, sacked Lagow and forced him to fumble on the Indiana 11. The next play, quarterback J.T. Barrett found wide receiver Binjimen Victor for a score, widening the lead to 42-21.Dobbins converts on fourth down before go-ahead scoreTrailing 14-13 with 7:47 on the clock in the third quarter, coach Urban Meyer put his trust in the offensive line and freshman running back J.K. Dobbins on fourth-and-1 at the Indiana 12. Dobbins followed center Billy Price up the middle for three yards and a first down.Dobbins was the workhorse for the Buckeyes in his first career game, but what made this play particularly important was that two plays later: Barrett punched in the go-ahead score, which came on the heels of Campbell’s dropped would-be touchdown reception.The Buckeyes hadn’t had many opportunities in the red zone before this moment, so Meyer rolled the dice and Dobbins seized the moment.Worley makes pivotal third-down stopOhio State had finally built a two-possession lead following Johnnie Dixon’s 59-yard touchdown run-and-catch towards the end of the third quarter. One more score could have put the game out of reach, but first, the defense needed to get the ball back in it’s offense’s hands.On third-and-1 around the one-minute mark in the third, linebacker Chris Worley attacked the line and stuffed Indiana running back Mike Majette behind the line. The tackle forced an Indiana punt from its 20-yard line and put a tired Hoosier defense back on the field. read more